Search results

145 items
  1. Keep the Farm TTIP- and CETA-free!

    • Guus Geurts
    19 January 2017
    Report

    In both TTIP and CETA food, agriculture, animal husbandry and horticulture play a major role and the prospects for European farmers and consumers are not good. TTIP negotiators are discussing abolishing or lowering import tariffs for agricultural products and the mutual recognition of each others’ standards relating to environment, animal welfare, food safety and labour rights is on the agenda.

  2. Stateless but rooted: Resistance, land and landscape in the occupied Syrian Golan Heights

    • Maria Kastrinou, Salman Fakher Al-Deen, Steven B. Emery
    15 March 2018
    Paper

    Could the struggle against Israeli occupation within this rural vantage on the Middle East offer new insights into the emancipatory potential of agrarian and land-based political movements?

  3. State of Power 2014 cover

    State of counter-power: How understanding neoliberalism’s cultural underpinnings can equip movements to overthrow it

    • Hilary Wainwright
    06 February 2014
    Report

    There is mounting evidence that neoliberal policies are losing legitimacy. The translation of such disaffection into positive commitment to an alternative, however, requires deeper disengagement from the dominant order and practical participation in creating alternatives. A social order built on escaping the pressures of democracy while at the same time depending on the capacities of many desiring democracy is unlikely to be stable. Thus the opaque and indirect forms of power typical of neoliberal rule are simultaneously sources of vulnerability and dependence, and breeding grounds for the power to subvert and transform.

  4. The agrarian origins of authoritarian rural populism in the United States: what can we learn from 20th century struggles in California and the Midwest?

    • Antonio Roman-Alcalá, Maywa Montenegro, Alex Liebman, Siena Chrisman
    15 March 2018
    Paper

    Interrogating the politics of rural places in generating both support for and struggle against authoritarian populism.

  5. Thumbnail

    Protecting Profits over People

    • Kevin Woods, Daniel Aguirre
    25 November 2014
    Report

    Myanmar is in the process of formulating an investment law and a land use policy that when combined will lay the foundations of development for the country. As it stands, these proposed instruments could have an adverse impact on human rights, and in particular land rights.

  6. Land politics, agrarian movements and scholar-activism

    • Jun Borras
    21 April 2016

    Land politics and the social movements mobilizing around land have changed profoundly, inspiring a new generation of scholar-activists. Professor Saturnino ('Jun') M. Borras explores land politics, agrarian movements and scholar-activism in his inaugural lecture at the International Institute for Social Studies. 

  7. Your Land, My Land, Our Land

    • Nyeleni Europe and Central Asia, Transnational Institute (TNI)
    28 May 2020
    Report

    The handbook is published by the Nyéléni Europe and Central Asia platform for Food Sovereignty to help nourish the food sovereignty movement with ideas that support local struggles for land. It also tries to connect different experiences and is an invitation to build collective intra-European support mechanisms for land struggles.

  8. The twin challenge of agrarian and climate justice

    • Jun Borras, Jennifer Franco, Clara Mi Young Park, Mads Barbesgaard, Yukari Sekine, Ye Lin Myint, Thant Zin
    02 March 2018
    Paper

    Dominant approaches to climate change mitigation are putting new pressures on small farmers and village dwellers, justifying dispossession by powerful actors who cast villagers' traditional ways of life as ecologically destructive or economically inefficient. In order to address the twin challenges of agrarian justice and climate justice, it is critical to understand the way new conflicts and initiatives intersect with old conflicts and the way they are compounded by undemocratic settings, and inequality and division along fault-lines of gender, ethnicity, class, and generation.

  9. Populism from above and below: agriculture and the political ambiguities of the Workers’ Party in Brazil

    • Daniela Andrade
    03 July 2018
    Paper

    Brazil has recently undergone a shift from economic growth to recession, as well as from a left-wing, neo-developmentalist politics to one on the far-right, authoritarian and economically ultraliberal. Such an economic and political U-turn touched upon the countryside in contrasting ways. This paper reflects on the politics of the past. It suggests that the road to regression was paved during the tenure of the Worker’s Party (PT), when politics were considered both popular and progressive. And it was under the PT’s rule when the ‘rural world’ mattered the most for politics.

  10. The Meaning of Land in Myanmar

    • Jennifer Franco, Hannah Twomey, Pietje Vervest, Tom Kramer
    28 January 2016
    Primer

    “Land is like our vein; it is vital for our living. After our land was confiscated, we don’t know what to do for our livelihood,” says a farmer from Kachin State in Myanmar. Today many inhabitants of rural communities in Myanmar live under threat of losing their lands in a battle for resources spurred by ethnic conflict, exploitative land laws, and powerful economic actors. The existence of a legal right to the land does not translate into that right being respected in practice, and people across the country are now working to protect their right to the land.

  11. Democracy Not for Sale

    • Stephan Backes , Jenny Gkiougki, Sylvia Kay, Charalampos Konstantinidis, Emily Mattheisen, Christina Sakali, Eirini Tzekou, Leonidas Vatikiotis, Pietje Vervest
    19 November 2018
    Report

    Austerity measures led to increased rural poverty and food insecurity in Greece and violated her people's human right to food. How did this happen and who is responsible?

  12. The Global Land Grab

    11 October 2012
    Primer

    A concise and indispensable critical guide to the global phenomenon of land grabbing. Find out how the global land grab is justified, what is driving it, why transparency and guidelines won't stop it, and learn about alternatives that could enable people and communities to regain control of their land and territories.

  13. Thumbnail

    Global Tree Plantation Expansion

    • Markus Kröger
    16 October 2012
    Paper

    The expansion of tree plantations and non-food crops is frequently left out of analysis on land grabbing, but is a crucial part of the picture. This paper provides an up-to-date review of tree plantations worldwide and summarises the latest research and data on their impact.

  14. As good as it gets? The new Sandinismo and the co-option of emancipatory rural politics in Nicaragua

    • Santiago Ripoll
    17 March 2018
    Paper

    What has Ortega's victory meant for progressive environmental and social policies in Nicaragua?

  15. Positive Land Investment Alternatives

    • Sylvia Kay
    21 July 2012
    Paper

    Much touted "land investment" involves appropriation or landgrabbing. What positive alternative investments should public policy support which would strengthen the right to food, re-valorise agricultural work, and build up ecological capital?

  16. Just Transition

    11 February 2020
    Report

    This workshop report shares key outcomes and insights from a workshop which took place in Amsterdam in October 2019, where participants from a range of organisations met to discuss the history of their collaborations around Just Transition and the lessons learned so far.

  17. Sacrifice zones in rural and non-metro USA: Fertile soil for authoritarian populism

    • Marc Edelman
    17 March 2018
    Paper

    What is the toll of downward mobility in rural and smalltown America?

  18. Thumbnail

    Rural Democratisation: (Re)Framing rural poor political action

    • Jennifer Franco
    01 February 2008
    Paper

    With two-thirds of the world’s poor rural poor, rural democratisation is clearly relevant and urgent, but at the same time an especially difficult--and underestimated--challenge. If democracy is to be organically rooted in any society, the struggle to “get there” must systematically be opened up to integrate rural poor citizens system-wide, taking stock of their aspirations and, more importantly, their existing efforts to gain control of decision-making affecting their lives.

Pages