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96 items
  1. Does the EU-Malaysia FTA undermine government policy space to regulate?

    29 November 2011
    Multi-media

    Charles Santiago, MP from Malaysia, discusses the dangers of EU-Malaysia FTA, particularly due to the inclusion of an investment protection chapter. 

  2. Indonesia’s alternative approach to ISDS

    Riza Damanik
    05 November 2015
    Multi-media
  3. ISDS cases in Latin America

    Cecilia Olivet
    05 November 2015
    Multi-media
  4. TTIP: corporate power grab

    John Hilary
    05 November 2015
    Multi-media
  5. No need for ISDS

    Cecilia Olivet
    05 November 2015
    Multi-media
  6. The UNASUR initiative

    Cecilia Olivet
    05 November 2015
    Multi-media
  7. TTIP: the new model for FTAs

    John Hilary
    05 November 2015
    Multi-media
  8. ISDS for ultimate deregulation

    John Hilary
    05 November 2015
    Multi-media
  9. Why workers should reject RCEP

    Benny Kuruvilla, Susana Barria
    16 June 2017
    Article

    What is the RCEP and why should Indian workers be worried about it?

  10. Re-Asserting Control: Voluntary Return, Restitution and the Right to Land for IDPs and Refugees in Myanmar - cover

    Flawed Global Rules in Agriculture: Need for a New Approach

    Benny Kuruvilla
    27 October 2016
    Multi-media

    Current global agriculture rules perpetuate market concentration in the North and dumping in the South

  11. Committing geocide: climate change and corporate capture

    Susan George
    22 September 2016
    Article

    Geocide is the collective action of a single species among millions of other species which is changing planet Earth to the point that it can become unrecognisable and unfit for life. But we still have a chance;  human beings can overcome even threats as terrifying as geocide, says Susan George.

  12. Polluters’ Paradise

    07 December 2015
    Report

    Climate change action demands moving to an energy system based on renewables and leaving fossil fuels in the ground. International investment agreements, and particularly ISDS, stand in the way of energy transition. They limit the ability of governments to set the terms of their energy policy, including the support of renewable energy. Investment agreements such as the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) and the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) will further empower corporations to challenge strong government action on climate change

  13. Peasants mobilized in Colombia: The strike is finished, the struggle continues

    Lyda Fernanda Forero, Danilo Urrea
    16 June 2016
    Article

    The current development model in place across Colombia has brought repression and harassment. The government has not fulfilled the terms of a 2013 agreement. On May 27th, the Cumbre Agraria, Campesina, Etnica y Popular1 called for a national Minga - a period of strikes and mobilizations - across Colombia to put pressure on the government.

  14. Impacts of investment arbitration against Latin America and the Caribbean

    • Cecilia Olivet, Bettina Müller, Luciana Ghiotto
    11 December 2017
    Report

    How fair is the investment arbitration system in Latin American and Caribbean (LAC) countries? Are investor-state disputes balanced between national and corporate interests? LAC countries are among the most affected by the investment arbitration system, representing 28.6% of all known investor-state disputes around the world. In particular, Argentina, Venezuela, Mexico, Ecuador, Bolivia and Peru account for 77.3% of the total number of claims against LAC countries. Analysis shows that the system so far heavily favours corporate interests. Investors have won in 70% of the cases brought against LAC countries. As a result, LAC States have already had to pay foreign companies 20.6 billion USD, which could cover Bolivia’s budget for health and education for four whole years.

  15. As the world meets to discuss ISDS, many fear meaningless reforms

    Alexander Beunder, Jilles Mast
    05 April 2019
    Article

    This week, representatives of around 100 countries are meeting in New York to talk about investor-state dispute settlement (ISDS). ISDS is a legal instrument that multinationals can use to sue governments for billions. External experts and observers fear that the new negotiations will amount to ‘old wine in new bottles’. They believe that those who benefit from this instrument (powerful states and top lawyers from the ISDS sector) are controlling the debate.

  16. Red Carpet Courts

    • Lora Verheecke, Pia Eberhardt, Cecilia Olivet, Sam Cossar-Gilbert
    24 June 2019
    Report

    Multi-billion dollar lawsuits bleeding cash-strapped nations, corporations reversing victories by environmental defenders and dazzling financial rewards for investors who perpetrated human rights abuses. Ten investor-state lawsuits which have been filed, threatened or decided since 2015, from all over the globe (in Europe, Africa, Asia and Latin America), demonstrate that ISDS is again and again used as a corporate weapon against the public interest. This report exposes the true nature of the ISDS regime through 10 recent stories.

    You can find the 10 stories online at 10isdsstories.org.

  17. Signing away sovereignty

    • Cecilia Olivet, Jaybee Garganera, Farah Sevilla, Joseph Purugganan
    24 May 2016
    Report

    Mining firms have been one of the main corporate sectors worldwide to take advantage of investor-state dispute mechanisms to sue states for regulation of mining, having sued governments for a total of USD 53 billion so far. The Philippines, one of five countries worldwide with the highest overall mineral reserves, has a web of investment treaties which severely constrain the government's ability to regulate or close polluting mines. This legal straitjacket will become even tighter if the EU–Philippines Free Trade Agreement and the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership (RCEP) proceed.

  18. Impacts of investment arbitration against African states

    • Bettina Müller, Cecilia Olivet
    08 October 2019

    By the end of August 2019, African States had been hit by a total of 106 known investment treaty arbitration claims.  This represents 11% of all known investor-state disputes worldwide. Between 2013 and 2018, there has been an unprecedented boom of claims against African governments. During these last six years, they received more investor claims than the previous 20 years combined. This paper exposes how the international investment regime affects African countries.

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