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126 items
  1. Deficiencies in financial oversight enable money laundering

    Tom Blickman
    20 June 2013
    Article

    After nearly 25 year of failed efforts, experts still ponder how to implement an anti-money laundering regime that works.

  2. Repressive policies only stoking Asean's drug problem

    Martin Jelsma, Tom Kramer
    10 June 2014
    Article

    The strategy of Asean's 10 member countries to become "drug free" by 2015 is failing dramatically. In the last decade, opium cultivation in the region has doubled, drug use -- especially of methamphetamines, a powerful synthetic stimulant -- has increased significantly, and there remain strong links between drugs, conflict, crime and corruption.

  3. Reforming the global drug-control system: The stakes for Washington

    Martin Jelsma
    11 July 2014
    Article

    Washington's new narrative defends the integrity of the UN drug control conventions, while allowing more flexible interpretations

  4. Drugs and violence in the Northern Triangle

    Pien Metaal, Liza ten Velde
    08 July 2014
    Article

    The upsurge in violence in Central America’s Northern Triangle is often named in one breath with the drugs market. While violence clearly thrives from an illegal trade met with exclusively repressive state responses, assumptions on cause and effect are frequently flawed or blurred.

  5. Fatal Attraction: Brownfield's Flexibility Doctrine and Global Drug Policy Reform

    David Bewley-Taylor, Martin Jelsma, Damon Barrett
    19 November 2014
    Article

    State-level cannabis reforms have exposed the inability of the United States to abide by the terms of the legal bedrock of the global drug control system. It is calls for a conversation the US federal government wishes to avoid. The result is a new official position on the UN drugs treaties that, despite its seductively progressive tone, serves only to sustain the status quo and may cause damage beyond drug policy.

  6. Has the US' War on Drugs Been Lost and what Lessons Should Europe Heed?

    Martin Jelsma
    26 November 2014
    Article

    With a greater number of casualties than the Afghanistan and Iraq campaigns combined, and very meagre results, the US is starting to reconsider the "War on Drugs", waged since the '70s.

  7. Colombia, more than three decades of toxic sprayings. Enough!

    Amira Armenta
    26 September 2014
    Article

    It is unfortunate that 35 years after the first chemical spraying in the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta, we are still writing about aerial sprayings in Colombia, demanding the current government to definitely defer an ecocide and incompetent policy.

  8. Thumbnail

    The Mexican connection

    19 November 2009 - Event
  9. Has the US' War on Drugs Been Lost

    26 November 2014 - Event
  10. Opium cultivation bounces back: TNI report shows dramatic failure of ASEAN’s ‘Drug Free’ strategy

    01 June 2014
    Press release

    Bouncing Back - Relapse in the Golden Triangle, a new in-depth report by the Transnational Institute (TNI) launched in Yangon, Burma/Myanmar, on Monday June 2, highlights the profound changes in the illicit drugs market in the Golden Triangle – Burma, Thailand and Laos – and neighbouring India and China over the past five years.

  11. Drugs and Democracy: Toward a Paradigm Shift

    01 February 2009

    The statement presents the main findings of the Latin American Commission on Drugs and Democracy. Prohibitionist policies based on the eradication of production and on the disruption of drug flows as well as on the criminalization of consumption have not yielded the desired results, concludes . We are further than ever from the announced goal of eradicating drugs. Breaking the taboo, acknowledging the failure of current policies and their consequences is the inescapable prerequisite for the discussion of a new paradigm leading to safer, more efficient and humane drug policies.

     

  12. Police, Harm Reduction, and HIV

    01 April 2008

    Injecting drug users (IDUs) account for the largest share of HIV infections in China, Russia, Ukraine, Central Asia, and much of Southeast Asia. Harm reduction measures such as access to clean needles and drug treatment with methadone or buprenorphine have been proven to reduce HIV risk behaviors. Yet law enforcement officials in many countries harass drug users at drug treatment clinics and needle exchange points, confiscate their medications, or arrest them for possession of clean syringes. These police practices help fuel the HIV epidemic by driving drug users away from lifesaving care while doing little to stem drug use.

     

  13. Towards a harm reduction approach to enforcement

    • Jonathan P Caulkins, Peter Reuter (RAND)
    01 January 2009

    Harm-reduction as a policy goal implies targeting directly drug-related harms rather than drug use itself. So far it has been largely a public health sector movement, focused on harms to users, most notably from heroin overdose, injection drug use and club drugs. Harm-reduction has offered fewer solutions to the problems of drug-related crime, violence, corruption or market externalities. However, harm-reduction has potentially much broader application when applied to the entire suite of harms generated by the production, distribution, consumption and control of drugs, not just drug use.

     

  14. If Supply-Oriented Drug Policy is Broken, Can Harm Reduction Help Fix It?

    • Victoria Greenfield, Letizia Paoli
    01 August 2010

    Critics of the international drug control regime contend that supply-oriented policy interventions are not just ineffective, but they also produce unintended adverse consequences. Research suggests their claims have merit. Lasting local reductions in opium production are possible, albeit rare; but, unless global demand shrinks, production will shift elsewhere, with little or no effect on the aggregate supply of heroin and, potentially, at some expense to exiting and newly emerging suppliers.

     

  15. Effect of Drug Law Enforcement on Drug-Related Violence

    • Dan Werb, Greg Rowell, Gordon Guyatt, Thomas Kerr, Julio Montaner, Evan Wood
    01 April 2010

    This report consists of a scientific review that illustrates the relationship between drug law enforcement and drug-related violence. Violence is among the primary concerns of communities around the world, and research from many settings has demonstrated clear links between violence and the illicit drug trade, particularly in urban settings. While violence has traditionally been framed as resulting from the effects of drugs on individual users (e.g., drug-induced psychosis), violence in drug markets and in drug-producing areas such as Mexico is increasingly understood as a means for drug gangs to gain or maintain a share of the lucrative illicit drug market.

     

  16. Global Commission on Drug Policy Report

    02 June 2011

    The global war on drugs has failed, with devastating consequences for individuals and societies around the world. Fifty years after the initiation of the UN Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs, and 40 years after President Nixon launched the US government’s war on drugs, fundamental reforms in national and global drug control policies are urgently needed.

     

  17. Drug Control Policy: What the United States Can Learn from Latin America

    • Coletta Youngers
    21 June 2011

    Since the 1912 signing of the Hague Opium Convention—the agreement that formally established narcotics control within international law—the United States has established itself as the dominant actor in determining drug control policies around the world. A chief architect of the international drug control regime, Washington has done its best to ensure that all subsequent international conventions obligate countries to adapt their domestic legislation to criminalize virtually all acts related to the illicit market in controlled substances, with the important exception of drug consumption. The predominant focus on prohibition and criminalization has been exported to Latin America, where the vast majority of the cocaine and heroin consumed in the United States originates.

     

  18. Drug Policy in the Andes

    • Coletta Youngers, Socorro Ramírez
    15 December 2011

    Fifty years after signing the United Nations Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs and 40 years after the U.S. government declared a "war on drugs," many obstacles remain despite the partial successes of efforts to counter the problem. The Andean-United States Dialogue Forum, noted with concern how drug policy has monopolized the diplomatic and economic agenda between the Andean countries, contributing to tensions among the governments and impeding cooperation on other crucial priorities, such as safeguarding democratic processes from criminal networks.

     

  19. Considering New Strategies for Confronting Organized Crime in Mexico

    • Eric Olson
    29 March 2012

    Mexico has experienced an unprecedented rise in crime and violence over the past five years with over 47,000 people killed in crime related violence during this period. For some, the increase in violence is a tragic by-product of President Calderón’s full frontal assault on criminal organizations. For others, the government’s actions, while well intended, have only marginally impacted trafficking while exacerbating the violence.

     

     

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