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93 items
  1. TNI bindt de strijd aan met multinationals

    Tijmen Lucie
    01 August 2014
    Article

    Wereldwijd steunt het Trans­national Institute (TNI), gevestigd in Amsterdam, sociale bewegin­gen die strijden tegen de macht van multinationals en voor duurzaamheid, vrede, en recht­vaardigheid. Directeur Fiona Dove: ‘Wij zijn de ideale schakel tussen sociale bewegingen, betrokken wetenschappers en beleidsmakers.’

         
  2. Storify: TNI at #WSF2016

    15 August 2016
    Infograph

    TNI and the Global Campaign to Reclaim Peoples Sovereignty, Dismantle Corporate Power and Stop Impunity were present at the World Social Forum to meet with partners and allies and develop analyses and strategies of mobilisation on Corporate Impunity, Public Alternatives, and Free Trade and Investment Agreements.

  3. State of Power 2014 cover

    State of Power 2014

    21 January 2014
    Report

    In its third annual ‘State of Power’ report, TNI uses vibrant infographics and penetrating essays to expose and analyse the principal power-brokers that have caused financial, economic, social and ecological crises worldwide.

  4. Dismantle Corporate Power

    15 June 2012
    Article

    Call to International Action for the economic, political, cultural and environmental sovereignty of our peoples.
    End the impunity of transnational corporations Now!

  5. State of Power 2012

    24 January 2012
    Report

    Who are the global 1%? What companies do they run? How do they escape accountability? Check out TNI's powerful infographic displays that expose the social and environmental costs of global corporate power.

  6. Susan George on UK tour

    04 December 2013
    Multi-media

    From 4-7 December, renowned political scientist Susan George presented her book How to Win the Class War: The Lugano Report II to packed houses in the UK, starting with the official launch in London.

  7. The Dark Side of Investment Agreements

    Cecilia Olivet
    16 December 2011
    Article

    Signing international investment treaties, in the hope of attracting foreign investments, has been a central strategy for governments looking to improve economic development. The less known side of this story is that by signing investment treaties, governments are giving away the sovereign right to regulate in the interest of people and the environment. They also expose themselves to the risk of spending millions in law suits that could have been used to serve public needs. It’s time that the dark side of investment is put under the spotlight.

  8. Susan George

    Profile
    President

    To contact Susan George : susangeorge(at)free.fr    ...

  9. The State of Corporate Power

    Brid Brennan
    22 January 2014
    Article

    Transnational corporations, particularly gas & oil industry, and banking have continued to benefit extraordinarily from the ongoing economic and financial crisis, says Brid Brennan, who presents TNI's State of Power Report 2014 at the Public Eye Awards in Davos.

  10. State of Power 2015

    13 January 2015
    Report

    The fourth edition of our annual State of Power report, coinciding with the international meeting in Switzerland of what Susan George calls “the Davos class”. This series seeks to examine different dimensions of power, unmask the key holders of power in our globalised world, and identify sources of transformative counter-power.

  11. Thumbnail

    Transnational Corporations on Trial

    • Wolfgang Kaleck, Miriam Saage-Maaß
    08 October 2008
    Report

    This study analyses existing legal means of holding European transnational companies liable for extraterritorial human rights violations. The authors examine four representative legal cases against European companies in Latin America that revolve around problems typical in the region.

  12. Reclaiming People’s Sovereignty in an era of Corporate Power

    Brid Brennan
    26 November 2014
    Article

    Despite the track record of systemic and systematic violations of the range of human rights, the efforts to establish legally binding obligations and an instrument of enforcement within the UN system have been defeated by determined corporate opposition. The current Guiding Principles developed by the former Special Representative of the UN Secretary General, John Ruggie, do not create "any new international legal obligations" and are therefore non-binding.

  13. Susan George: How to win the Class War

    • Susan George
    25 November 2013
    Book

    The Transnational Institute is proud to present Susan George's compelling satirical 'guide for corporate leaders': How to win the Class War – The Lugano Report II

  14. UN meeting provides historic opportunity to stop corporate impunity

    Brid Brennan
    13 June 2014
    Article

    Popular demands for a binding treaty on corporate human right violations will get an unprecedented hearing this month at the UN Human Rights Council (UNHRC).

  15. COP19 Guide to Corporate Lobbying

    05 November 2013
    Report

    At a time when genuine progress towards real climate action is more vital than ever, this guide exposes how the corporations most responsible for climate change have taken over this year’s UN climate talks.

  16. The EU and the corporate impunity nexus

    • Mónica Vargas, Olivier Petitjean, Brid Brennan, Raffaele Morgantini, Juliette Renaud
    15 November 2018
    Report

    For decades, affected communities around the globe have been resisting the modus operandi of transnational corporations (TNCs) in their territories and workplaces and documenting systemic human rights violations and the track record of corporate impunity with their lives and their deaths. Corporate impunity is embedded in and protected by an ‘architecture of impunity’ that legitimises and legalises the operations of TNCs. This architecture has been established through free trade and investment agreements, the World Trade Organisation (WTO), the structural adjustment policies of the International Monetary Fund (IMF), World Bank and other financial instruments and the aggressive push for public-private partnerships (PPPs). At the core of this architecture is the infamous investor-state dispute settlement (ISDS) system, a private arbitration system that allows TNCs to sue states whenever they consider that their future profits are threatened by new measures or policies aiming at improving social and environmental protection. Thus, it neutralises the function of the state, whose primary responsibility is to defend public  interest and protect the well-being of its citizens and the planet from corporate interests.

  17. Historic Permanent Peoples Tribunal (PPT) Hearing on TNCs in Southern Africa

    Brid Brennan
    29 August 2016
    Article

    The historical first Permanent Peoples Tribunal Hearing in Southern Africa exposed the crimes of Transnational Corporations in the region and the growing peoples resistance.

  18. Big Corporations, the Bali Package and Beyond

    • Mary Louise F. Malig
    11 November 2014
    Report

    This sequel to the “Tailored for Sharks” report delves deeper into the role the World Trade Organization (WTO) and its legal system play in the corporate architecture that benefits and protects interests of Transnational Corporations (TNCs); details concrete examples of TNCs behind trade disputes; and presents the post-Bali corporate roadmap. 

  19. Peoples Sovereignty vs. Impunity Inc.

    Peoples Sovereignty vs Impunity Inc.

    • Diana Aguiar, Joanna Cabello, Manuel Pérez-Rocha, Tamra Gilbertson, Erin Callary, Godwin Uyi Ojo, Martin Mantxo, Mónica Vargas, Marcela Vechionne, Pablo Fajardo, Richard Girard
    07 July 2015
    Report

    In eight articles various cases are presened that aim to serve as tools of action for activists to use in their fight for justice against the systematic violation of human rights and other crimes committed by transnational corporations.

  20. 8 Proposals for the Binding Treaty on Transnational Corporations and Human Rights

    20 July 2015
    Report

    An international legally binding instrument on transnational corporations (TNCs) has the potential to substantially promote the protection and fulfilment of human rights in the long-term and on a global scale. It can contribute to ending the impunity that TNCs routinely enjoy for their human rights violations, especially in countries of the Global South, and to ensuring access to justice for the victims of their activities.

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