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101 items
  1. Morocco and Cannabis

    • Tom Blickman
    15 March 2017
    Policy briefing

    Is the aim of reducing cannabis cultivation realistic or beneficial for Morocco? What would it actually mean for the major production area the Rif – one of the poorest, most densely populated and environmentally fragile regions in the country? This briefing will give some historical background, discuss developments in the cannabis market, and highlight environmental and social consequences as well as the recent debate about regulation in Morocco and European policies.

  2. Cannabis fields in Bekaa destroyed for second day

    23 July 2012
    Other news

    Authorities continued efforts to eradicate cannabis fields in the Bekaa, east Lebanon, as normal activity in the region remained subdued due to reports of prowling gunmen. Two bulldozers were used in the operation in addition to 17 tractors after 15 tractors were sabotaged by gunmen a day earlier. The operation is proceeding with caution, especially following reports of armed men in the vicinity. (See also: Farmers, government battle over hashish in Lebanon's Bekaa Valley)

  3. The impact of Alternative Development in Burma and Laos

    Ernestien Jensema
    30 October 2012
    Article

    Alternative development and crop substitution programmes seem to be a guise for the Chinese government to support large scale agro businesses in Northern Burma and Laos. 

  4. The Land-Drugs Nexus in Myanmar

    Tom Kramer
    06 August 2015
    Multi-media

    Farmers in Myanmar use opium as a cash crop, “because they cannot grow enough food to feed their families for the whole year”.

  5. Opium meets Development: Exploring the Opium Question in Contemporary Afghanistan

    • Mariam Morid
    04 February 2016
    Paper

    In light of the April 2016 United Nations General Assembly Special Session (UNGASS), a change of the global order on drug policy should be made. Any outcome of UNGASS  will have essential developmental impacts on Afghanistan’s economy and especially on those involved in the agricultural production side of the opium economy that is farmers and farm-workers.

     

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    Downward Spiral

    • Martin Jelsma, Tom Kramer
    17 June 2005
    Policy briefing

    Opium farmers in Afghanistan and Burma are coming under huge pressure as local authorities implement bans on the cultivation of poppy.

  7. ecstacy-pils

    Trees for Ecstasy

    Tom Blickman
    04 February 2009
    Article

    Many people believe that ecstasy is merely a synthetic drug that is manufactured solely with chemicals, so-called precursors. However, the main raw material for ecstasy, safrole, is extracted from various plants and trees in the form of safrole-rich oils—also known as sassafras oil. Preventing ecological damage and unsustainable harvesting of safrole-rich oils is urgently needed to preserve fragile ecosystems.

  8. Global Experiences with Harm Reduction for Stimulants and New Psychoactive Substances

    20 May 2014 - Event

    The objective of this seminar is to compare the findings on innovative tools for the prevention of problematic cocaine use patterns, with experiences with harm reduction measures for stimu­lants in other regions of world.

  9. The problem of glyphosate spraying

    Pedro Arenas
    13 April 2015
    Article

    An article published recently in El Espectador commented on the two issues that underpin the Colombian discourse on the subject of drugs. To be precise, the government’s discourse is far from reflecting what goes on in practice, or the actions that are still being carried out in the country. Colombia is seen as the star pupil in complying with the United Nations drug treaties and it continues to do things that many other countries would avoid.

  10. Alternative development from the perspective of Colombian farmers

    • Susana Ojeda
    15 May 2011
    Policy briefing

    Alternative Development programmes have been widely discussed from the point of view of experts, technocrats, politicians and academics, with advocates and detractors debating whether such programmes contribute to decreasing the cultivation of illegal crops. However, little is known about the opinions of the people targeted by these programmes and the implications that they have for their daily lives.

  11. brief41-bisbis

    Drugs as war economy and the peace process in Colombia: dilemmas and challenges

    • Ricardo Vargas
    28 October 2013

    The fourth item on the agenda of talks “to end the conflict,” on the issue of drugs, seems to reflect rather a flat and simplistic view of the classic circuit of drug production, processing, trafficking and use. The relationship between drugs and armed conflict in Colombia is in fact much more complex. This report analyses the challenges that drug trafficking poses to the development of a sustainable peace.

  12. Between Reality and Abstraction

    • Hugo Cabieses, Pien Metaal, Mirella van Dun
    05 March 2013
    Policy briefing

    At the International Conference on Alter­native Development (ICAD), held 15-16 November 2012 in Lima, the Peruvian Government continued to insist on the relevance of “Alternative Development (AD),” with particular emphasis on the so-called San Martín “miracle” or “model.”

  13. Connecting the dots... Human rights, illicit cultivation and alternative development

    • Martin Jelsma
    22 October 2018
    Report

    How can we resolve the tensions between current drug control policies and states’ human rights obligations? The international human rights framework clearly establishes that, in the event of conflicts between obligations under the UN Charter and other international agreements, human rights obligations take precedence. As legally regulated cannabis markets start to grow, now is the time to secure a legitimate place for small farmers using alternative development, human rights and fair trade principles.

  14. Alternative Development from the perspective of Colombian farmers

    • Susana Ojeda
    11 July 2011
    Policy briefing

    There is considerable debate on whether Alternative Development is successful from the point of view of experts and politicians, but what do Colombian farmers targeted by these programmes think and what are the implications for their daily lives?

  15. Bekaa farmers push against eradicating marijuana growth in Lebanon

    02 June 2014
    Other news

    The growth of cannabis is gradually increasing in the fields in the Bekaa valley. This is mainly due to policies adopted by successive governments that neglected the agricultural sector, while the state has demonstrated a limited capacity to eradicate cannabis crops in the past, and mainly in the last two years. This has encouraged farmers, bearing losses and facing agriculture problems amid a lack of state assistance, protection, support and compensation, to opt for growing marijuana.

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    The security approach to the drugs problem

    • Ricardo Vargas
    21 December 2009
    Policy briefing

    The drugs problem in Colombia is intertwined with structural factors at the social, economic, institutional and cultural levels. Moreover, its relationship to the armed conflict has had serious consequences for the socio-economic conditions of peasant and indigenous communities affected by the production of raw materials used to produce cocaine.

  17. Alternative Developments, Economic Interests and Paramilitaries in Uraba

    • Moritz Tenthoff
    01 September 2008

    The following document analyses how the Forest Warden Families Programme and the Productive Projects of the Presidential Programme Against Illegal Crops in Colombia have been used to legalise paramilitary structures and implement mega agro-industrial projects in the Uraba Region.

     

  18. Drugs on the agenda of Colombian peace talks

    Drugs and Democracy
    10 December 2012
    Article

    Inclusion of the drug issue on the agenda of the peace talks between the Colombian government and the FARC, which are being held in Havana, Cuba, is a smart move.

  19. Myanmar Opium Farmers Forum at the Commission on Narcotic Drugs in October 2018

    Myanmar Opium Farmers Forum (MOFF)
    30 October 2018
    Multi-media

    The voice of communities involved in illicit cultivation had long been excluded from policymaking platforms. However, thanks to growing networks such as the Myanmar Opium Farmers Forum, more and more farmers have gained more space to provide input to drug policy discussions at the UN level.

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