Search results

25 items
  1. Majority of Spaniards oppose new "gag law"

    06 July 2015
    Other news

    Three quarters of Spaniards oppose the country's new "gag law", which has brought in a series of measures opponents say hark back to the dark days of dictator Francisco Franco.

  2. The new drug warriors

    01 May 2015
    Other news

    The war on drugs is edging towards a truce. Half of Americans want to lift the ban on cannabis. America’s change of heart has led many to wonder if the UN conventions might be reformed to legalise some drugs and treat the use of others as a problem requiring health measures, not criminal or military ones. But as America has drawn back from prohibition, new drug warriors are stepping up to defend it. Russia is foremost among them. “The Russians have taken over the hard-line role that the US used to play,” says Martin Jelsma of the Transnational Institute.

  3. Chan and Sukumaran execution 'illegal', but Indonesia ignores Australia again

    01 May 2015
    Other news

    The execution of Andrew Chan and Myuran Sukumaran was illegal under international law according to advice provided to Julie Bishop, but Australia's request that Indonesia submit to the judgment of the International Court of Justice was ignored. The Australian ambassador asked Indonesia's consent on March 10 to explore the issue before the international court, but the Foreign Minister still has not had a reply. The Australian government had strong legal advice that the men's execution was illegal under the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, which Indonesia signed in 2006. (See also: Bali nine execution: pair's lawyer describes 'machinery of death)

  4. Which countries have the death penalty for drug smuggling?

    27 April 2015
    Other news

    Indonesia executed eight convicted drug traffickers. The sentences have provoked outrage from the prisoners’ home countries, none of which hands down the death penalty to drug offenders. Brazil and the Netherlands had already withdrawn their ambassadors, following an earlier round of executions in January. Indonesia is rare in executing drug smugglers, who in most of the world are condemned only to long stretches in prison. Where else does trafficking earn a death sentence?

  5. On the death penalty for drugs

    02 March 2015
    Other news

    The Annual Report of the International Narcotics Control Board (INCB), released today, calls upon States that ‘continue to impose the death penalty for drug-related offences to consider abolishing the death penalty for such offences’.

  6. Indonesia's executions: Drugs diplomacy in a diplomatic crisis?

    25 February 2015
    Other news

    All diplomatic efforts earlier this month to save Brazilian and Dutch citizens from execution in Indonesia failed.

  7. Former world leaders call for nations to decriminalize drug use and experiment with legalization

    09 September 2014
    Other news

    Drug use should be decriminalized and governments should experiment with drug legalization and regulation, a group of former world leaders argues in a new report. The recommendations from the Global Commission on Drug Policy reflect the views of the former leaders of some of the countries hardest hit by the illegal drug trade. They strongly argue that a costly global war on drugs has not only failed but threatens public health, fosters discrimination and fuels the very crime and violence it seeks to prevent. (See also: Coalition urges nations to decriminalize drugs and drug use)

  8. Global drug policy is still deadly and ineffective

    Samuel Oakford
    02 June 2014
    Other news

     If you actually read the treaties, while they do set firm limitations on the legal, "non-medical" or "non-scientific" sale of schedule drugs — limits that Uruguay, Colorado and Washington ignored when legalizing cannabis — they don’t otherwise obligate countries to penalize drug use. Even the 1988 convention, the harshest of the three, which instructs countries to criminalize use, still provides an out for states, allowing such laws only as they are "subject to its constitutional principles and the basic concepts of its legal system." This loophole has been used by the Dutch to argue legally for their coffee shops.

  9. human-rights-day

    Human rights and drug control: an irreconcilable contradiction?

    Ernestien Jensema
    15 October 2013
    Other news

    This week both the UN Commission on Narcotic Drugs (CND) in Vienna and the UN General Assembly 3rd Committee in New York discuss new drug control resolutions related to upcoming reviews of global drug policy. The high-level CND review in March 2014 and the Special Session of the General Assembly (UNGASS) on drugs in 2016 provide opportunities to change course and to ensure drug policy fully respects human rights.

  10. The Next Step in Drug Treatment

    Icaria Editorial
    25 April 2013
    Other news

    The mandatory-sentencing craze that drove up the prison population tenfold, pushing state corrections costs to bankrupting levels, was rooted in New York’s infamous Rockefeller drug laws. These laws, which mandated lengthy sentences for nonviolent, first-time offenders, were approved 40 years ago next month. They did little to curtail drug use in New York or in other states that mimicked them, while they filled prisons to bursting with nonviolent addicts.

  11. Denmark ends Iranian drug crime support

    09 April 2013
    Other news

    The Danish development minister, Christian Friis Bach (Radikale), has decided to cease providing financial support to a United Nations anti-drug programme due to revelations that Iran has been using the programme to execute hundreds of criminals every year. "It's a signal to Iran that the implementation of the death penalty is unacceptable and not something we can be involved with," Bach told Politiken newspaper.

  12. cnd

    An ugly truth in the war on drugs

    Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Ruth Dreifuss
    11 March 2013
    Other news

    This week, representatives from many nations will gather at the annual meeting of the United Nations Commission on Narcotic Drugs in Vienna to determine the appropriate course of the international response to illicit drugs. Delegates will debate multiple resolutions while ignoring a truth that goes to the core of current drug policy: human rights abuses in the war on drugs are widespread and systematic. 

  13. no

    Report: Mexico disappearances constitute 'crisis'

    19 February 2013
    Other news

    Human Rights Watch called Mexico's anti-drug offensive "disastrous" in the report Mexico's Disappeared: The Enduring Cost of a Crisis Ignored, that cites 249 cases of disappearances that the group says mostly show evidence of having been carried out by the military or law enforcement. The report says the "enforced disappearances" follow a pattern in which security forces detain people without warrants at checkpoints, at homes or work places, or in public. When victims' families ask about their relatives, security forces deny the detentions.

  14. Call for end to anti-drug aid for regimes with death penalty

    29 December 2012
    Other news

    Human rights groups have urged the UK government to heed the recommendations of an influential parliamentary committee that has told the government to stop funnelling money into anti drug-trafficking programmes in countries that administer the death penalty. Over the past decade, the UK has given millions of pounds to help Pakistan, China and Iran combat drug smuggling. MPs and human rights groups are horrified by credible claims that the increased aid has met with a corresponding rise in arrests which, in turn, has led to more people ending up on death row, including several Britons.

  15. UK aid to Iran's war on drugs has led to rise in hangings, UN warns

    27 October 2012
    Other news

    Britain's funding of Iran's anti-drugs trafficking programmes has been called into question after a UN watchdog expressed alarm at a sharp rise in the number of narcotics smugglers executed in the Islamic state. A new report by Christof Heyns, the UN's special rapporteur on extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions, spells out concerns that the flow of overseas aid to Iran has been followed by an increase in hangings.

  16. New report connects international aid for drug enforcement to gross human rights violations

    20 June 2012
    Other news

    Millions of dollars in international aid for drug enforcement is spent in countries with extremely poor human rights records resulting in serious abuses, according to a new report by the non-governmental organisation, Harm Reduction International. Launched in advance of the UN day against drugs, on June 26, the report Partners in Crime: International Funding for Drug Control and Gross Violations of Human Rights tracks drug enforcement funding from donor states, often via the United Nations, to countries where executions, arbitrary detention, physical abuse and slave labour are weapons in the war on drugs.

  17. When the UN Won't Condemn Torture You Know Something's Very Wrong

    Damon Barrett (Deputy Director at Harm Reduction International)
    04 April 2012
    Other news

    When the UN's drugs watchdog, the International Narcotics Control Board (INCB), was asked recently about its official position on torture carried out in the name of drug enforcement, one would have expected an unequivocal denunciation. Instead, what was given was an unequivocal refusal to do so. In the light of documented cases of torture to extract information from suspects and to punish drug users and those convicted of drug offences, this refusal to condemn the most egregious of human rights abuses is cause for serious concern and highlights clear tensions between the UN human rights and drug control regimes.

  18. INCB’s Tortured Logic

    02 April 2012
    Other news

    On several recent occasions, the International Narcotics Control Board (INCB) has refused to offer an opinion on sanctions that violate international law, such as the death penalty. The following is a transcript from a Civil Society Dialogue with the President of the INCB, Hamid Ghodse, during the UN Commission on Narcotic Drugs on 15 March 2012. For a commentary on the dialogue please see the article at Inter-Press Service titled, ‘Narcotics Watchdog Turns Blind Eye to Rights Abuses’.

  19. Narcotics Watchdog Turns Blind Eye to Rights Abuses

    Patrick Gallahue
    28 March 2012
    Other news

    In a world where drug offences are punishable with the death penalty, torture or arbitrary detention, we must ask how far States can go to enforce the global prohibition on drugs. According to the so-called ‘guardian’ of the international drug control treaties – as far as they want. On several recent occasions, the International Narcotics Control Board (INCB) has refused to offer an opinion on sanctions that violate international law – even if those sanctions are imposed in order to comply with the drug control treaties.

  20. Annual report of the International Narcotics Control Board: Corruption, human rights and OST

    International Harm Reduction Association (IHRA)
    03 March 2011
    Other news

    The International Narcotics Control Board yesterday presented its annual report for 2010. Every year the Board selects a thematic issue of focus, dedicating its opening chapter to that issue. This year it is corruption. In an earlier blog post we asked whether the INCB would have the impartiality to be able to look at the drug control system itself, and its role in the generation of corruption, as the UNODC had done in 2008. The answer is no. At no point is the international criminal market in drugs recognised as a creation of drug control.

Pages