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    Emerging Trends in Global Commodities Markets

    • Carolina Milhorance de Castro
    18 May 2015
    Paper

    Drawing on the wider political economy of global commodities markets, this paper analyses the dynamics of agrarian change related to the rise of emerging economies.

  2. Political Economy of the Rise of the Contemporary Industrial Tree Plantation Sector in Southern China

    • Yunan Xu
    19 May 2015
    Paper

    Industrial tree plantations (ITP), as a newly emerging sector, is expanding quickly and massively in Southern China, involving foreign corporations (including Finnish and Indonesian) tied to a variety of domestic partners, both state and corporate. In some places, the villagers embrace the land deals, while in others these land deals have provoked conflicts.

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    New ‘Webs of Power’ and Agrarian Transformations in Cambodia: Where are the women?

    • Clara Mi Young Park
    18 May 2015
    Paper

    In February 2012 Economic Land Concessions granted to private companies in Cambodia totalled 2,033,664 ha., and increased to 2,289,490 ha. by June 2013, covering 63 per cent of the country’s arable land. Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) inflows to Cambodia grew by 73 per cent from 2011 to 2012. The country, together with Myanmar and Vietnam, is referred to as one of the ‘emerging bright spots of the subregion’.

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    CP maize contract farming in Shan State, Myanmar: A regional case of a place-based corporate agro-feed system

    • Kevin Woods
    18 May 2015
    Paper

    The Bangkok-based Sino-Thai company Choern Pakard Group (CP Group), Asia's largest and most prominent agro-food/feed corporation, has led an industrial maize contract farming scheme with (ex-)poppy upland smallholders in Shan State, northern Myanmar to supply China’s chicken-feed market. Thailand, as a Middle-Income Country (MIC) and regional powerhouse, has long-tapped China’s phenomenal economic growth and undersupplied consumer demand.

  5. Chinese and Other Foreign Investments in the Brazilian Soybean Complex

    • Gustavo de L. T. Oliveira
    18 May 2015
    Paper

    As Brazil and China become the world’s leading exporter and importer of soybeans respectively, Chinese companies have sought investments in Brazil to wrest greater control over the flows and profits of the international soybean trade from North Atlantic-based transnational companies. While some promote these as positive “South-South cooperation”, many others condemn them as neocolonial “land grabs” that displace peasants, cause environmental degradation, and deindustrialize the Brazilian economy.