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7 items
  1. There is no state: Authoritarian returns on Haiti’s high Central Plateau

    • Sophie Sapp Moore
    17 March 2018
    Paper

    How have rural dwellers understood and responded to historical and resurgent forms of authoritarian populism in Haiti’s hinterland since the 1970s?

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    “Freedom” – what a pleasant word!

    Boris Kagarlitsky
    28 January 2010
    Article

    If freedom is defined by a state’s non-participation in economic processes, as the Heritage Foundation suggests, then Haiti today would win first prize, as after the earthquake, it has no government at all.

  3. Haiti, Again?

    Phyllis Bennis
    20 January 2010
    Article

    The marginalisation of the UN and the militarisation of the US aid effort in Haiti reflect how humanitarian needs take a back seat to the Pentagon's priorities.

  4. Haiti's Classquake

    Jeb Sprague
    18 January 2010
    Article

    The 'classquake' in Haiti today is compounded by decades of capitalist globalization and U.S. intervention.

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    The WTO Doha round and EPAs in an era of crisis

    Dot Keet
    05 November 2009
    Article

    The major causes of the economic and social crises are now being even more blatantly promoted by the EU - both within the multilateral WTO negotiations and bilateral and bi-regional FTA/EPA negotiations - as the fundamental solutions.

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    Repairing the weakest links: a new agenda for fragile states

    • David Sogge
    27 October 2009

    In order for fragile states and the concept of state weakness to be properly understood, they need to be considered in the contexts of political economy and world history. Four apparently disparate cases – Guatemala, Haiti, Kosovo and Angola – show surprising similarities, and highlight common lessons for international state-building efforts.

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    Haiti: unravelling the knot

    Mariano Aguirre, Amélie Gauthier
    03 September 2008
    Article
    Haiti's interlocking crises - from food-security to social violence, inequality to judicial corruption - make it one of the most challenging arenas in the world for establishing the right mix of international and domestic policies. Mariano Aguirre & Amélie Gauthier draw lessons from a research trip to suggest where the priorities should lie.