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12 items
  1. 7th GIZ/TNI Asian Informal Drug Policy Dialogue

    21 April 2016
    Report

    The 7th GIZ/TNI Asian Informal Drug Policy Dialogue was organised in collaboration with the National Authority for Combating Drugs (NACD) of the Cambodian Government. Key issues on the agenda were recent trends in the drug market in the region and the development of effective policy responses. Specific attention went to the implementation of the UN Guiding Principles on Alternative Development in the Asian context, including in the implementation of alternative development programmes in conflict areas. The involvement of affected communities in policy making and project implementation was another important theme that was discussed. A major aim of the dialogue was to look at the state of the Asian drug policy before UNGASS 2016.

  2. Repressive policies only stoking Asean's drug problem

    Martin Jelsma, Tom Kramer
    10 June 2014
    Article

    The strategy of Asean's 10 member countries to become "drug free" by 2015 is failing dramatically. In the last decade, opium cultivation in the region has doubled, drug use -- especially of methamphetamines, a powerful synthetic stimulant -- has increased significantly, and there remain strong links between drugs, conflict, crime and corruption.

  3. Opium cultivation bounces back: TNI report shows dramatic failure of ASEAN’s ‘Drug Free’ strategy

    01 June 2014
    Press release

    Bouncing Back - Relapse in the Golden Triangle, a new in-depth report by the Transnational Institute (TNI) launched in Yangon, Burma/Myanmar, on Monday June 2, highlights the profound changes in the illicit drugs market in the Golden Triangle – Burma, Thailand and Laos – and neighbouring India and China over the past five years.

  4. Bouncing Back

    • Ernestien Jensema, Martin Jelsma, Tom Kramer, Tom Blickman
    01 June 2014
    Report

    TNI's indepth examination of the illegal drug market in the Golden Triangle, which has witnessed a doubling of opium production, growing prison populations and repression of small-scale farmers. This report details the failure of ASEAN's 'drug free' strategy and the need for a new approach.

  5. Letter from parliamentarians on the disappearance of Sombath Somphone

    18 June 2013
    Article

    We, the undersigned, are writing to express our deep dismay at the lack of political will to conduct a serious investigation into the disappearance of Mr. Sombath Somphone. 

  6. Six months since Sombath Somphone disappeared

    14 June 2013
    Press release

    On June 15th it is six months since Sombath disappeared. Amnesty International has released a report in which they state that Sombath “is most likely a victim of an enforced disappearance at the hands of the authorities.”

     
  7. Sombath - 100 Days

    26 March 2013
    Article

    On December 15th 2012 Sombath Somphone disappeared, taken away in a truck by unknown persons after being stopped by police in the Lao capital, Vientiane. Nobody has seen or heard from him since.Today, March 25th 2013, is the 100th day since Sombath’s disappearance.

     
  8. Accusations of landgrabbing overshadow ASEM

    06 November 2012
    In the media

    According to NGOs active in Laos, the recent ASEM 9 conference was held on land that had been taken away from local residents. They say this is representative of an increase in landgrabs across Asia.

  9. European and Asian leaders' summit displaces farming community

    Pietje Vervest, Sylvia Kay
    06 November 2012
    Article

    Delegates of the 9th Asia European Heads of Government Meeting (ASEM9) may not have known that the luxury villas, in which they met, had displaced a thriving farming community. But the story of the land grab is all too familiar one and casts doubt on the commitment of Asian and European nations to work for food security and sustainable development.

     
  10. The impact of Alternative Development in Burma and Laos

    Ernestien Jensema
    30 October 2012
    Article

    Alternative development and crop substitution programmes seem to be a guise for the Chinese government to support large scale agro businesses in Northern Burma and Laos. 

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    The limits of Chinese expansionism

    Shawn W. Crispin
    29 December 2010
    In the media

    China's fast growing capital expansion within South East Asia is raising concerns about landgrabs and exploitative practices, especially as it is often aligned with support for authoritarian regimes such as Burma.

     
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    Drugs and Laos: Related websites and documents

    Drugs and Democracy
    17 November 2005
    Article

    Links on Drugs and Laos