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57 items
  1. Looking in the Mexican mirror

    Mónica Vargas
    10 June 2020
    Article

    From 2 to 11 December 2019, a caravan of international observers (#ToxiTourMexico) travelled from West to East along the neovolcanic belt in Mexico, crossing dense industrial corridors that have attracted capital from the US, Europe and other countries along the way. Members of the Caravan witnessed the alarming environmental and health emergency situations that the affected communities are experiencing and their impressive organising and mobilising capacity and dignity.

  2. Thumbnail Amapola, opio y heroína

    Poppies, opium, and heroin: Production in Colombia and Mexico

    • Guillermo Andrés Ospina, Jorge Hernández Tinajero, Martin Jelsma
    16 April 2018
    Report

    Poppy cultivation in Mexico and Colombia is part of a local economy geared almost exclusively toward the illegal market abroad: it is driven by demand for heroin, primarily in the United States.

  3. Reconsidering the logistics of autonomy: Ecological autonomy, self-defense and the polícia comunitaria in Álvaro Obregón, Mexico

    • Alexander Dunlap
    17 March 2018
    Paper

    Inspired by experiences in Álvaro Obregón, or Gui’Xhi’ Ro in Zapotec, this paper discusses ideas of popular ecological struggle and self-defense.

  4. Wind energy development in Mexico: an authoritarian populist development project?

    • Gerardo A. Torres Contreras
    17 March 2018
    Paper

    What are the current context and consequences of Mexico's wind energy policy in the rural setting of the Isthmus of Tehuantepec?

  5. Into the void: The loss of governance in rural Mexico

    • César Suárez Ortiz
    17 March 2018
    Paper

    Why has populism remained an important political force within Mexico?

  6. Unmasked: Corporate rights in the renewed Mexico-EU FTA

    • Cecilia Olivet, Manuel Pérez-Rocha
    13 June 2016
    Report

    The EU and Mexico launch negotiations for a ‘modernised’ Free Trade Agreement. A key feature is the investment protection chapter which grants major multinational companies in Mexico and the EU the exclusive right to challenge democratic decisions taken by States, even when they were taken in the public interest. The report outlines six reasons of major concern.

  7. The Citizen’s Proposed National Water Law

    Coordinadora Nacional Agua para Tod@s
    09 May 2016
    Opinion

    In Mexico, a 2012 constitutional amendment recognised the human right to water, requiring a new national water law. Coordinadora Nacional Agua para Tod@s Agua para la Vida has proposed the citizens' bill, which has been developed through a nation-wide bottom up process. It connects local grassroots struggles against privatisation, water resource contamination, indigenous peoples, and urban popular movements for access to, and local control over, water resources. Important local water struggles in Puebla, Guadalajara, Tuxtla Gutiérrez, Ramos Arizpe, Saltillo and Mexico City are the background of this national mobilisation. The citizens' bill ambitiously addresses sustainable water basin plans and democratic water service provision in an integrated way.

  8. The meaning, relevance and scope of energy democracy

    Daniel Chavez
    09 October 2015
    Article

    What does the concept of energy democracy offer to the struggle against climate change and energy poverty?

  9. Improving global drug policy: Comparative perspectives and UNGASS 2016

    • Vanda Felbab-Brown, Harold Trinkunas (eds)
    28 April 2015

    As the world prepares for the 2016 Special Session of the United Nations General Assembly on the World Drug Problem (UNGASS 2016), an increasing number of countries around the world now find the regime’s emphasis on punitive approaches to illicit drugs to be problematic and are asking for reform. In this moment of global disagreement, the Brookings project on Improving Global Drug Policy provides a unique comparative evaluation of the effectiveness and costs of international counternarcotics policies and best approaches to reform.

  10. Mexico legislators consider regulating marijuana to protect human rights

    Zara Snapp
    13 July 2014
    Article

    In Mexico, since 2006 a public security strategy has been implemented based on militarization, which has prioritized the use of force – including lethal force – based on the presumption of national security above principles of the safety of citizens. Involvement of armed forces as the central axis for Mexico’s security strategy has sparked serious concerns, particularly pertaining to obligations regarding human rights.

  11. In Search of Rights

    • The Research Consortium on Drugs and the Law (CEDD)
    09 July 2014

    The Research Consortium on Drugs and the Law (Colectivo de Estudios Drogas y Derecho, CEDD) has published a new study that assesses state responses to illicitly-used drugs in eight countries in Latin America: Argentina, Brazil, Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, Mexico, Peru and Uruguay. The study found that Latin American governments’ approach to drug use continues to be predominantly through the criminal justice system, not health institutions. Even in countries where consumption is not a crime, persistent criminalization of drug users is common.

     

  12. Reimagining Drug Policy in the Americas

    27 June 2014

    Latin America is now at the vanguard of international efforts to promote drug policy reform: Bolivia has rewritten its constitution to recognize the right to use the coca leaf for traditional and legal purposes, Uruguay has become the first nation in the world to adopt a legal, regulated Cannabis market, and Colombia, Mexico, Guatemala, and Ecuador are openly critiquing the prevailing international drug control paradigm at the UN. And now with the United States itself relaxing its marijuana laws state by state, the U.S. prohibitionist drug war strategies are losing credibility in the region.

     

  13. NAFTA’s 20 Years of Unfulfilled Promises

    Manuel Pérez-Rocha
    07 January 2014
    Article

    Twenty years after it took effect, NAFTA has failed the vast majority of Mexicans.

  14. medelln

    Open letter to Ministers Responsible for Public Security in the Americas

    25 November 2013
    Press release

    We, the undersigned human rights organizations, address you on this Fourth Meeting of Ministers Responsible for Public Security (MISPA) to follow up on the call upon governments to revise the orientation of drug policies that are being implemented in the Americas. This request for the governments took place during the 43rd Session of the OAS General Assembly which took place last June.

    Read the letter (PDF) and see the signatories

  15. Zuid-Amerika wil af van War on Drugs

    20 June 2013
    In the media

    "Al met al is dit een historische omslag", zegt Martin Jelsma van de denktank TNI uit Amsterdam en medeauteur van het OAS-rapport.

  16. Thumbnail

    In Mexico, guilty till proven innocent

    05 June 2013
    In the media

    As the Mexican government has stepped up its efforts to combat drug trafficking, the number of people who have been detained and accused of crimes related to drugs has dramatically increased.

  17. hrw-mexico0213

    Mexico's disappeared

    19 February 2013

    This 176-page report documents nearly 250 “disappearances” during the administration of former President Felipe Calderón, from December 2006 to December 2012. In 149 of those cases, Human Rights Watch found compelling evidence of enforced disappearances, involving the participation of state agents.

  18. Land Grabbing in Latin America

    16 January 2013
    Article

    A special issue of the Canadian Journal of Development Studies introducing a previously under-explored geographic region into the emerging land grab literature. Available for free till end of May.

  19. Major victory for President Morales: UN accepts “coca leaf chewing” in Bolivia

    14 January 2013
    Article

    Bolivia will again belong to the 1961 Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs after its bid to rejoin with a reservation that it does not accept the treaty’s requirement that “coca leaf chewing must be banned” was successful Friday. Opponents needed one-third of the 184 signatory countries to object, but fell far, far short despite objections by the US and the International Narcotics Control Board.

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