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7 items
  1. Hydropower in Myanmar: For Whose Benefit?

    Nang Shining
    16 December 2016
    Article

    Amidst the many challenges Myanmar now faces, the threats to the environment are urgent – and they are growing more extreme. The situation is especially serious in the case of mega dams and hydropower where a host of projects are being promoted, without appropriate planning or public consultation, that are likely to cause irreversible harm to communities and natural ecosystems around the country. Not only are many of the projects located in nationality areas that are conflict zones, but the bulk of the energy produced will also be exported to neighbouring countries.

  2. The right to land at crossroads in Myanmar

    Jennifer Franco
    05 July 2016
    Article

    What is the role of land in establishing lasting future peace in Myanmar? The country is at a crossroads, and facing rapid land polarization. However, the inauguration of a new government chosen by a landslide in historic elections offers an unprecedented opportunity to change course in a positive direction. An approach that prioritizes poor, vulnerable and marginalized groups especially ethnic nationalities, women, and youth, could lay a foundation for peace.

  3. ‘There is no voice of real farmers’

    Portia Larlee
    11 December 2014
    Article

    The release of the draft policy, part of a process towards enacting a new National Land Law and “harmonising” existing legislation, was greeted with objections and criticism from farmers’ organisations and ethnic minority groups throughout the country.

  4. The draft land use policy: putting big business first

    Jennifer Franco
    11 December 2014
    Article

    There are some big problems with the current draft of the policy and they stem mainly from its failure to recognise that land has more than an economic function.

  5. Project on climate change, land grabbing and resource conflict

    13 January 2014
    Article

    TNI's Agrarian Justice Work Area and TNI's Burma Project are starting a major research on climate change mitigation policies, land grabbing and conflict in Burma and Cambodia, 2014-2017.

  6. Why peace and land security is key to Burma's democratic future

    Tom Kramer
    11 May 2012
    Article

    Analysis of the social costs of large-scale Chinese-supported rubber farms in northern Burma suggests that the future for ordinary citizens will be affected as much by the country's chosen economic path as the political reforms underway.