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15 items
  1. Securing whose future? Militarism in an age of climate crisis

    Nick Buxton
    11 May 2016
    Article

    How is the US military seeking to address climate change and what are its implications for environmental and social justice?

  2. What can we expect to see in 2011?

    Marcos Arruda, Mariano Aguirre, Phyllis Bennis, Walden Bello
    13 January 2011
    Article

    Changing global power balances, continuing crises, Iran, Afghanistan. Four TNI fellows share their predictions for 2011.

  3. The global resource grab

    Jun Borras, Maryann Manahan, Yao Graham
    30 June 2011
    Multi-media

    Worsening climate change and the emergence of new economic powers is leading to a renewed scramble for resources, with negative consequences for many impoverished communities.

  4. Extractivism and resistance in North Africa

    • Hamza Hamouchene
    20 November 2019
    Paper

    Northern African countries are key suppliers of natural resources to the global economy, from large- scale oil and gas extraction in Algeria and Tunisia, to phosphate mining in Tunisia and Morocco, to water-intensive agribusiness paired with tourism in Morocco and Tunisia. The commodification of nature and privatisation of resources entailed in these projects has led to serious environmental damages, and forced these countries into a subservient position in the global economy, sustaining and deepening global inequalities.

  5. The Emerging Geo-Strategic Landscape in Central Asia

    Ross Eventon
    15 June 2011
    Article

    Recent developments in Afghanistan suggest the New Great Game is intensifying in Central Asia.

  6. Disarm! For a climate of peace

    30 September 2016 - Event

    TNI is one of the major partners of the International Peace Bureau Congress on Military and Social Spending that will be held in Berlin. TNI will be organising workshops on the links between militarism and climate change, extractivism, racism and the rise of the homeland security industry.

  7. Twenty-first century energy superpower

    Michael Klare
    21 September 2010
    Article

    As the worlds new leading energy consumer, China's choice of energy strategy over the coming years will have defining implications for international relations and the fate of the environment.

  8. The Secure and Dispossessed: security for whom?

    27 January 2016
    Article

    Open Democracy interviewed Ben Hayes and Nick Buxton, who argue that the climate change agendas of governments and corporations have securitised and militarised environmental policies to the world's detriment.

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    Securing the Climate of Capitalism

    Ben Hayes, Nick Buxton
    04 November 2015
    Article

    Ben Hayes and Nick Buxton, editors of the forthcoming book The Secure And The Dispossessed, ask: do we really want the military and corporations to lead on how we deal with the climate crisis?

  10. Book review: Dispossessed in the Name of ‘Security’

    01 February 2016
    Article

    Book review by Robert J. Burrowes of The Secure and the Dispossesed: How the Military and Corporations are Shaping a Climate-Changed World. The book is edited by Nick Buxton and Ben Hayes, who are both associated with TNI.

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    Climate change, energy security and arms trade

    25 April 2013
    In the media

    While it is increasingly clear that climate change is an irreversible processes that will hit people and the environment hard, the defence industry sees new profit opportunities.

     
  12. The Secure and the Dispossessed

    23 October 2015

    While the world’s scientists and many of its inhabitants despair at the unfolding impacts of climate change, corporate and military leaders see nothing but challenges and opportunities.

  13. Leaders Sidestep Pentagon's Carbon Emissions at COP21

    14 December 2015
    Multi-media

    With some 800 bases around the globe, it is no surprise that the U.S. military is the world's biggest consumer of petroleum. What is perhaps more surprising is that this so-called carbon bootprint has been completely exempted from international climate agreements, including the one currently being finalized at COP21 Paris Climate Change Conference. 

  14. Learning from Disaster? After Sendai

    Richard Falk
    17 March 2011
    Article

    Despite a terrible history with nuclear technology, corporate and state actors try to disconnect these mega disasters from the energy industry in order to "normalise" that which continues threatens our very existance.