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  1. Thumbnail

    Video: Emerging Powers: Allies or Rivals?

    Boris Kagarlitsky, Dr. Chaohua Wang, Research Scholar in Chinese Studies at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA)
    21 January 2011
    Multi-media

    The economic elites are turning to a neoliberal Keynesianism to save the crisis of capitalism, which is doomed to fail because it does not address its root causes.

  2. The World Bank's Africa Strategy

    Patrick Bond
    08 June 2011
    Article

    Whose interest does the ten-year Strategy document for Africa actually serve? The World Bank has shown little insight into the real problems Africa faces, focusing instead on ineffective policies, support for repressive regimes and projects that are known to have failed.

  3. Indian United Progressive Alliance: Time to change course

    Praful Bidwai
    20 May 2010
    Article

    The Indian government must give up its neo-liberal polices and obsession with GDP growth and shift its ideological centre of gravity leftwards.

  4. Australian Overseas Development Assistance and the Rural Poor

    • Dianto Bachriadi
    11 November 2009
    Report

    Australian overseas development assistance is not simply driven by a desire to assist poorer countries in the Asia-Pacific region. The fundamental premise of Australian aid is, first and foremost, its own national interest.

  5. Land Reform Policies in Belgian Official Development Assistance

    • Jonas Vanreusel
    01 September 2009

    For the most part of its history, the Belgian Official Development Assistance (ODA) focused on narrow agricultural productivity issues. With the slow but steady insertion of Belgian ODA into the international development community’s priorities, instruments and methods, Belgium started to focus on broader rural development.

  6. Polarising Development – Introducing Alternatives to Neoliberalism and the Crisis

    • Thomas Marois, Lucia Pradella
    13 May 2015
    Book

    Social movements and critical scholars have triggered renewed debate on possible different futures for on developmental change. They  are no longer tethered to the pole of ‘reform and reproduce’. A new pole of ‘critique and strategy beyond’ neoliberal capitalism has emerged