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6 items
  1. Greece is sold off and sold out

    07 July 2016
    In the media

    Le Monde Diplomatique - The latest study from the Transnational Institute (TNI) on the effects of the ‘privatising industry’ in Europe concludes that ‘there is no evidence that the privatised companies are more efficient’. Instead, privatisation has undermined wage structures, made working conditions worse and increased income inequality.

  2. We're selling off the world - but who wins?

    10 March 2016
    In the media

    By all rights, the 2008 global financial crisis should have marked the end of the era of privatisation and the return to the more equitable mixed economy model which dominated in the post-war era. 

    Instead, it only ushered in a new, more extreme phase in the neoliberal project.

  3. Reversing the Tide: Cities and Countries Are Rebelling Against Water Privatization, and Winning

    25 September 2015
    In the media

    Thruthout - Private companies have been working to make a profit from water since the 1600s, when the first water companies were established in England and Wales. The first wave of water privatization occurred in the 1800s, and by the mid- to late-19th century, privately owned water utilities were common in Europe, the United States and Latin America, and began to appear in Africa and Asia.

  4. The Global Fight Over Our Drinking Water Is Just Getting Started

    02 September 2015
    In the media

    The Nation -  Water is an essential natural element, but around the world, it’s also an artificially endangered resource.

  5. Thumbnail

    Water privatisation: a worldwide failure?

    John Vidal
    03 February 2015
    In the media

    Lagos is among the many cities in the global south where investment in water supplies is desperately needed, yet there is no consensus on whether the answer lies with private management, the public sector, or a combination of both.

  6. No single course for providing water

    Claire Provost
    23 March 2012
    In the media

    Two new books seek to challenge the claims that anti-privatisation activists present infinite criticisms but few alternatives.