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5 items
  1. Guiding Drug Law Reform in Myanmar

    • Drug Policy Advocacy Group
    29 November 2017
    Report

    A draft bill amending Myanmar 1993 Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic Substances Law was published in newspapers in March 2017 for public consultation. It was subsequently discussed in the upper house of Parliament (Amyothar Hluttaw) on 16 August 2017.

  2. Bouncing Back

    • Ernestien Jensema, Martin Jelsma, Tom Kramer, Tom Blickman
    01 June 2014
    Report

    TNI's indepth examination of the illegal drug market in the Golden Triangle, which has witnessed a doubling of opium production, growing prison populations and repression of small-scale farmers. This report details the failure of ASEAN's 'drug free' strategy and the need for a new approach.

  3. တစ္ေက်ာ့ျပန

    • Ernestien Jensema, Martin Jelsma, Tom Kramer, Tom Blickman
    01 June 2014
    Report
     

    TNI ၏ ေရႊႀတိဂံေဒသအတြင္းရွိ တရားမ၀င္မူးယစ္ေဆး၀ါးေစ်းကြက္အေပၚ ႏိႈက္ႏိႈက္ခၽြတ္ခၽြတ္ေလ့လာဆန္းစစ္ခ်က္အရ ဘိန္းစိုက္ပ်ိဳးထုတ္လုပ္မႈ ႏွစ္ဆခန္႔ျပန္လည္ျမင့္တက္လာသည့္အျပင္ ေထာင္သြင္းအက်ဥ္းခ်ခံထားရသူ မ်ားျပားလာၿပီး အေသးစားတစ္ႏိုင္တစ္ပိုင္ ေတာင္သူငယ္ေလးမ်ားအေပၚ ျပင္းျပင္းထန္ထန္ ႏွိပ္ကြပ္လ်က္ရွိေၾကာင္း ေတြ႔ရွိခဲ့ရသည္။ ဤအစီရင္ခံစာအတြင္း ေအာင္ျမင္ခဲ့ျခင္းမရွိသည့္ အာဆီယံေဒသ ‘မူးယစ္ကင္စင္ေရး’ မဟာဗ်ဴဟာ၏ က်ဆံုးမႈကို အေသးစိတ္အခ်က္အလက္မ်ားျဖင့္ တင္ျပထားၿပီး ခ်ဥ္းကပ္လုပ္ေဆာင္မႈအသစ္ လိုအပ္လ်က္ရွိေၾကာင္း မီးေမာင္းထိုးျပထားပါသည္။

  4. The Rise and Decline of Cannabis Prohibition

    • David Bewley-Taylor, Martin Jelsma, Tom Blickman
    07 March 2014
    Report

    Cannabis was condemned by the 1961 Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs as a psychoactive drug with “particularly dangerous properties” and hardly any therapeutic value. Ever since, an increasing number of countries have shown discomfort with the treaty regime’s strictures through soft defections, stretching its legal flexibility to sometimes questionable limits.

  5. Systems Overload

    09 December 2010

    An unprecedented one-year comparative study on the impact of the drug laws and prison systems in eight Latin American countries – Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Mexico, Peru and Uruguay – reveals that drug laws have contributed to the prison crises these countries are experiencing. The drug laws impose penalties disproportionate to many of the drug offenses committed, do not give sufficient consideration to the use of alternative sanctions, and promote the excessive use of preventive detention.