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38 items
  1. Agrofuel Crops

    • Jennifer Franco, Lucia Goldfarb, David Fig, Luisa Mendonca, Les Levidow, Mireille Hoenicke
    06 April 2010
    Report

    In recent years, there has been renewed interest in developing agrofuels on a large scale as an alternative to fossil fuel. EU biofuels policy, in particular, assumes that the environmental impacts associated with agrofuels production will be largely beneficial. This study questions such optimistic assumptions.

  2. Link between capitalism and hunger

    Boris Kagarlitsky
    17 March 2011
    Article

    Speculation on food commodities causes hunger, despite state regulations; thirty years of liberalization of the food market has resulted in a food crisis on a scale higher than ever.

  3. Land grabbing through a food security lens

    Gloria Pracucci
    18 April 2013
    Article

    Out of the kaleidoscope of different angles through which land grab can be analysed, the one elevating food security – and food sovereignty – as a crucial concern is amongst the most engaging and the less inquired, especially in its intertwining with policy elaboration.

  4. Assumptions in the European Union biofuels policy: frictions with experiences in Germany, Brazil and Mozambique

    • David Fig, Jennifer Franco, Lucia Goldfarb, Les Levidow, Mireille Hönicke, Maria Luisa Mendonça
    27 July 2010
    Paper

    EU biofuels policy is based on the assumption that it will lead to greenhouse gas savings, energy security and rural development, however in-depth research in Germany, Brazil and Mozambique reveals fundamental contradictions between EU policy assumptions and practices in the real world.

  5. Thumbnail

    Seeds of discontent

    02 October 2013
    Multi-media

    Watch this trailer for a powerful new documentary about how supposedly well-meaning Dutch and Swedish investments can result in land grabbing and human rights abuses in one small community in Mozambique.

     
  6. Thumbnail

    Global Tree Plantation Expansion

    • Markus Kröger
    16 October 2012
    Paper

    The expansion of tree plantations and non-food crops is frequently left out of analysis on land grabbing, but is a crucial part of the picture. This paper provides an up-to-date review of tree plantations worldwide and summarises the latest research and data on their impact.

  7. Advocates for sustainable palm oil are ignoring human rights violations in Latin America

    Doug Hertzler
    20 September 2016
    Article

    A false picture of a sustainable industry was painted for investors and other participants, last month at the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO) , which ignores the harmful impacts of the aggressive expansion of the palm oil industry on local communities

  8. Paving the way for Agrofuels

    • Tamra Gilbertson, Nina Holland, Stella Semino, Kevin Smith
    25 September 2007
  9. The Politics of Flex crops and Commodities

    • Jennifer Franco, Jun Borras, Pietje Vervest, S. Ryan Isakson, Les Levidow
    20 June 2014
    Report

    Flex crops are crops that can be used for food, feed, fuel or industrial material. Their emergence as critical global commodities is integral to understanding today's agroindustrial economy. 

  10. A foreseeable disaster

    • Helena Paul
    09 July 2013

    Why despite ten years of accumulating evidence on the social and environmental cost of agrofuels, does the European Commission persist with its failed policies? An analysis of the EU's bioeconomy vision, how it is fuelling land grabs in Africa, the agrofuels lobby that drives policy, and the alternative visions for energy that are being ignored.

  11. The Politics of Agrofuels and Mega-land and Water deals

    • David Fig, Jun Borras, Sofia Monsalve Suárez
    29 June 2011

    The Procana Bioethanol project in Mozambique is a clear example of how agrofuel investments contribute rather than mitigate climate change, and are often accompanied by dispossession and impoverishment caused by landgrabbing.

  12. cover_the_bioeconomy

    The Bioeconomy

    04 November 2015
    Primer

    The bioeconomy is promoted as a response to current global social and environmental crises, with its promise of replacing fossil fuels with ‘renewable’ biological resources. How does it play out on the ground? Who wins and who loses? And what are the alternatives?

  13. What makes the reformed Committee on World Food Security potentially attractive?

    Nora McKeon
    22 April 2016
    Multi-media

    The Committee for World Food Security is a privileged observation point to reflect on how global food governance and social mobilization intersect.

  14. Visit to Brazilian bio-ethanol plant

    EU bioenergy use: the invisible social and environmental harms

    Katie Sandwell, Lyda Fernanda Forero
    08 December 2016
    Article

    The EU's reputation for clean and sustainable energy conceals a dirtier reality, particularly where renewable energy policies and development are driven by corporate interests. Today, nearly two thirds of all “renewable” energy in the EU comes from bio-energy. Although bio-energy appears to provide a sustainable alternative to fossil fuels, there are serious questions about its actual emissions profile, and about environmental and social conflicts which are created or exacerbated by the industrial-scale production of biomass to meet European energy needs.

  15. Flex trees

    • Markus Kröger
    20 June 2014
    Report

    Flex trees seem to offer timely opportunities for socio-environmentally sustainable solutions, but also present dangers, particularly if such changes accelerate the concentration of land and plantation-based development, whereby forests compete with and may replace food production.

  16. Flexibilising global agri-biomass value chains: a techno-market fix for resource burdens?

    • Les Levidow
    04 February 2016
    Paper

    An eco-efficient bioeconomy, combining environmental sustainability and economic advantage, has been promoted to alleviate resource constraints of rising global demand. For political forces resisting environmental degradation and people’s dispossession, several means are necessary to contest this global agenda and counterpose alternatives.

  17. The Political Economy of Oil Palm as a Flex Crop

    • Alberto Alonso-Fradejas, Juan Liu, Tania Salerno, Yunan Xu
    19 May 2015
    Paper

    The ‘how’ and ‘why’ of oil palm flexing is heavily influenced by a synthesis of forces and relations within and around the oil palm value web. These dynamics impact the way flexing among oil palm’s different uses is influenced and/or carried out by various powerful actors within the state, the private sector, and civil society.

  18. The Great Soy Expansion

    • Miguel Urioste F. de C.
    01 September 2013
    Report

    In the last two decades, the best agricultural lands in Bolivia have been put into commercial production by large-scale producers closely linked to foreign investors, particularly Brazilians.

  19. The Politics of Flexing Soybeans in China and Brazil

    • Gustavo de L. T. Oliveira, Mindi Schneider
    15 September 2014
    Report

    The trajectories of soy developments in Brazil and China are related despite moving largely in opposite directions.

  20. Flex Crops: A Primer

    • Jun Borras, Jennifer Franco, S. Ryan Isakson, Les Levidow, Pietje Vervest, Gustavo de L. T. Oliveira, Mindi Schneider, Ben McKay, Sérgio Sauer, Ben Richardson, Roman Herre, Alberto Alonso-Fradejas, Juan Liu, Tania Salerno, Yunan Xu, Markus Kröger
    14 May 2018
    Primer

    What is a flex crop, and what does this mean for food, land, climate, and people?

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