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  1. ketamine

    Ketamine: why not everyone wants a ban

    13 March 2015
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    China is proposing there should be a worldwide ban on ketamine - the drug that can lead to users needing to have their bladders removed. But ketamine is used as an anaesthetic drug in much of Africa, and there are fears further international controls could affect medical usage too. The Chinese say that they are requesting the lowest level of restriction - known as schedule four - which would not affect its use for medical purposes. But Dr Kabwe in Lusaka's main hospital says any restriction will create a level of bureaucracy that will prohibit its use.

  2. The war on ketamine

    08 March 2015
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    In a dispute that pits the war on drugs against global health needs — and one UN agency against another — a pair of Canadian researchers is spearheading a last-ditch bid to keep a widely used anesthetic from being declared an illicit narcotic.

  3. WMA warns against making essential anaesthetic a controlled drug

    06 March 2015
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    Scheduling ketamine would restrict its availability worldwide, which  would lead to harmful impact on animal health and welfare, as well on public health. The World Medical Association is urging its 111 member associations to lobby their governments to oppose scheduling the anaesthetic agent Ketamine as a controlled drug.

  4. Why ‘Special K’ is good medicine

    02 March 2015
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    In the global world of illicit drug policies, the granddaddy of them all is the United States.

  5. Ketamine control plan condemned as potential disaster for world's rural poor

    27 February 2015
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    A proposal that is about to come before the UN to restrict global access to ketamine, a drug abused in rich countries, would deprive millions of women of lifesaving surgery in poor countries, according to medicines campaigners.

  6. The UK needs common sense about ketamine

    17 February 2015
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    Ketamine is a unique anaesthetic and analgesic that has unfortunately become a popular recreational drug.

  7. ‘Club drug’ ketamine lifts depression in hours

    21 May 2013
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    The largest study to date confirms that ketamine — a “club drug” that is also legally used as an anesthetic — could be a quick and effective way to relieve depression. The results were presented at the annual meeting of the American Psychiatric Association and represent growing excitement about ketamine’s potential. The study included 72 patients who had previously failed to respond to at least two other medications.