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84 items
  1. Coca Leaf

    01 January 2015
    Topic

    The coca leaf has been chewed and brewed for tea for centuries in the Andean region – and does not cause any harm and is probably beneficial to human health. Yet the leaf is treated as if it is comparable to cocaine or heroin. The inclusion of the coca leaf in the list of narcotic drugs raises questions about the logic behind the current system of classification under the UN conventions. TNI believes we can find a more culturally sensitive approach to plants with psychoactive or mildly stimulant properties, and should distinguish more between problematic, recreational and traditional uses of psychoactive substances.

  2. Drug law reform in Bolivia

    01 January 2011
    Topic

    The current law prohibits drug use and punishes possession for personal use with internment and forced treatment. Domestically, a legal market for coca leaf has always existed and Bolivia is trying to change the international legal regime for the coca leaf.

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    For a EU Just Investment Policy

    01 January 2014
    Topic
  4. BRICS Initiative for Critical Agrarian Studies (BICAS)

    01 January 2015
    Topic

    The BRICS Initiative for Critical Agrarian Studies (BICAS) is a collective of largely BRICS-based or connected academic researchers concerned with understanding the BRICS countries and their implications for global agrarian transformations. Critical theoretical and empirical questions about the origins, character and significance of complex changes underway need to be investigated more systematically.

  5. Drug law reform in Ecuador

    01 January 2015
    Topic

    Like in other countries in the region, drug control measures by the government of Ecuador have been modeled after the pressure and interests of the United States. Even though the country is an important hub for the transit of illicit drugs and chemical supplies, as well as for money laundering, trafficking is not perceived as a significant threat. This is also the case because the cultivation of coca is minimal compared to other countries in the region such as Colombia, Peru and Bolivia. Paradoxically, Ecuador has one of the most severe drug legislations in Latin America.

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    BITS

    01 January 2014
    Topic

    Bilateral Investment Treaties (BITs) are intended to regulate the commercial investment relationships between two countries. These are supposed to facilitate trade and investment by providing security for investments. However, it is common practice for BITS to establish ISDS mechanisms that allow for transnational companies to sue the states in which they operate based on a very broad interpretation of damage to investments. This has led to a surge in litigations against states and prompted a growing number of governments to seek to cancel or amend existing BITs.

  7. Conventions on drugs

    01 January 2015
    Topic

    The three major international drug control treaties are mutually supportive and complementary. An important purpose of the 1961 Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs and the 1971 Convention on Psychotropic Substances codify internationally applicable control measures in order to ensure the availability of narcotic drugs and psychotropic substances for medical and scientific purposes, and to prevent their diversion into illicit channels and include general provisions on trafficking and drug use. The 1988 United Nations Convention against Illicit Traffic in Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic Substances significantly reinforced the obligation of countries to apply criminal sanctions to combat all the aspects of illicit production, possession and trafficking of drugs.

  8. Drug law reform in Peru

    01 January 2011
    Topic

    In Peru, coca leaf consumption has never been criminalized and a state-controlled licensing system exists for its cultivation and distribution. With regard to other drugs, in 1982, Decree 122 established that dependent users shall no longer be punished for possession of drugs for immediate personal consumption, but only when a medical certification is provided to prove the dependency.

  9. Drug law reform in Argentina

    01 January 2013
    Topic

    Argentina is known as a “transit country” for cocaine. In the last few decades the use of controlled drugs has increased, and in recent years some cocaine chlorhydrate processing laboratories have appeared, though not to the same extent as in Colombia, Peru or Bolivia. Problem drug use in Argentina is associated with cocaine base paste, known locally as paco or lata.

  10. Drugs Scheduling

    01 January 2015
    Topic

    A more refined distinction is required to define appropriate drug control measures according to the specific characteristics of drug substances, their health risks, the dynamics of their markets and their user groups. The existing classification schedules for drugs from the UN 1961 and 1971 Conventions do not provide sufficient differentiation. The consideration of such diverse substances as coca, cocaine, cannabis, opium and heroin in the same schedule, hampers effective policy responses that can properly take into account the different properties of drugs and the reasons people use them.

  11. Mild Stimulants

    01 January 2015
    Topic

    Could mild herbal stimulants such as the coca leaf, khat, kratom or ephedra offer alternatives to the more concentrated substances that now dominate the market? Could the recreational stimulants market be steered towards a less harmful direction over time through differentiating the control mechanisms between plants and synthesized derivatives? Different legal regimes are currently implemented between countries and vary greatly for the different plants, some of which are erroneously considered as new psychoactive substances.

  12. Producers of Crops

    01 January 2015
    Topic

    TNI’s Drugs & Democracy programme has dedicated a large share of its attention on (national and international) drug control policies towards crop cultivation and alternative development. In doing so, the programme works closely with - representatives and/or families of - producers of cannabis, opium, and coca, whose voices are often left out from the policymaking arenas. Furthermore, the programme aims to build bridges between crop producing communities and important stakeholders such as civil society or nongovernmental organisations, community leaders, and policymakers - as an integral part of the programme’s efforts to advocate for more humane and inclusive approaches guided by the principles of human rights, development, and harm reduction.

  13. stand on guard after burning a coca laboratory near Tumaco, Colombia, in the southwest state of Narino, June,8, 2008,

    Drugs & Conflict

    15 August 2017
    Topic
    Initially focusing on coca producing areas in the Andean Region, TNI's work on Drugs & Conflict has since expanded to cover the world’s main opium producing areas with a focus on Myanmar and Afghanistan. Over the past two decades, TNI staff has worked extensively with local organisations and researchers to advocate for more inclusive, effective and humane approaches to drug related issues in these conflict situations, while analysing the links between drug use, production, and conflict and what these mean for efforts to promote peaceful and just societies. TNI also focuses on promoting the rights of local communities involved in the cultivation of crops declared illicit, and their involvement in drug policy making, the peace process and the design and implementation of development programmes.
  14. Drug law reform in Honduras

    01 January 2010
    Topic

    In recent years, Honduras has become the country with the highest levels of violence in the world. According to figures from the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC), in 2012 the country had a murder rate of 92 per 100,000 people. Organised crime and its connection with drug trafficking may be one of the causes of this increase in violence. Drug trafficking gangs use the country as a transit point on the route to the United States. The violence is related to the conflicts between the gangs in their dispute over territory, extortion, money laundering, etc. Several legislative initiatives were proposed in 2012 to reduce drug trafficking and improve transparency and effectiveness in the judicial system and the security forces.

  15. War on Drugs

    01 January 2015
    Topic

    The war on drugs is waged at its worst in the source zone of production. Major consumer countries - the US in particular - think they are able to tackle drug consumption at home by reducing the supply from the "source zones" such as the Andean region - Colombia, Bolivia and Peru - and Central and South-East Asia - Afghanistan and Burma. The primary goal of the supply reduction strategies is to decrease the amount of drugs entering the major consuming countries and subsequently, because the strategy allegedly leads to higher prices that would lead to lower demand.

  16. Drug Law Reform

    12 July 2017
    Topic

    The TNI/CEDD (Colectivo de Estudios Drogas y Derecho / Research Consortium on Drugs and the Law ) Drug Law Reform Project promotes more effective and humane drug policies through analysis of existing drug control policies and by promoting dialogue among key stakeholders and decision-makers. The project is focused on Latin America and hopes to stimulate  reforms by pointing out good practices and lessons learned in areas such as proportionality of sentences, prison reform, and the status of the coca leaf in the international conventions.

  17. Reclassification of substances

    01 January 2015
    Topic

    A more refined distinction is required to define appropriate drug control measures according to the specific characteristics of substances, their health risks, the dynamics of their markets and their user groups. The classification schedules of the UN 1961 and 1971 Conventions do not provide sufficient differentiation. The consideration of such diverse substances as coca, cocaine, cannabis, opium and heroin in the same schedule, hampers effective policy responses taking account of the different properties and reasons people use them.

  18. FAQ

    19 June 2010
    Topic

    Gifts and Donations FAQs

    What is the Transnational Institute?

    The Transnational Institute (TNI) is an international research and advocacy institute committed to building a just, democratic and sustainable planet. For more than 40 years, TNI has served as a unique nexus between social movements, engaged scholars and policy makers.

    When was the Institute founded?

    The Transnational Institute was founded in 1974 as the international programme of the Washington DC-based Institute for Policy Studies.
    You can find an overview of the history of TNI here: https://www.tni.org/en/page/history

    What are the institute's research areas?

    The programmes we currently focus on are listed here https://www.tni.org/en/programmes

    Does the Institute publicise the names of its donors and contributors?

    TNI never shares or sells the names or contact information of its private donor lists with any other organisations or individuals. The finance section of the annual report has a list of the organisational funders from the year before.

    How can I donate?

    Our donation page provides several options tailored to your capabilities and wishes, such as a one-time donation, recurring donation, or fundraiser (for if you want to crowdfund for us, for instance via Facebook).

    Via the payment form you can choose to make either a one-off donation or set up a recurring direct debit (Monthly or Yearly) . You can pay by PayPal, iDeal, credit card or Sofort.

    We currently use Mollie for processing these payments.

    You can also make payments via the Whydonate app available on Android and Iphone.

    If I have any questions and want to contact a person who can I talk to?

    If you want to check something or just need advice regarding a gift or donation please send an email to our community builder Jess Graham: J.graham@tni.org. If you would like her to phone you, you can state your availability and she will be happy to give you a call.

    Can I make a donation as a gift for someone?

    Yes, if you have given a donation and would like a letter of thanks in another person's name we will happily provide this for you. Email Jess Graham: j.graham@tni.org

    How much of the donation goes to TNI?

    Our payment controller collects the payments safely. They do charge us for each transaction as per below.

     

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    You can pay in USD, GBP, AUD and Euros and the amount will be converted to Euros to be sent to us.

    Is TNI an NGO?

    TNI has special NGO consultative status with UN Ecosoc since 1974, is registered as a non-profit foundation with the Dutch Chamber of Commerce, and has charitable status in the Netherlands. TNI is also recognised as an independent, non-profit research centre in The Netherlands and at European Union level. It is an Associate Member of the International Social Science Council and the European Association of Development Institutes.

    
Where can I see the annual report?

    Our 2017 annual report can be found here: http://annual2017.tni.org/
    As an open and transparent organisation we share all our goals and finances by making our annual report availabile for each year. Audited accounts can be found here: https://www.tni.org/en/page/finances

    How is TNI supported?

    TNI is a non profit organisation which means that it relies completely on external grants and donations. Currently we get grants from funders to continue our work in specific areas. See: https://www.tni.org/en/page/finances.

    How will my donation support TNI?

    Our donors are crucial to our work. Your donation will help TNI continue to stand up for peace, justice and sustainability where it matters most.

    Your gift supports our activists, organisers, writers and office staff to continue making a difference. There are many ways to support us whether it be a donation, by sharing our reports or coming to one of our events.

    Donations from people like you help us continue to exist. The gifts and actions of our supporters give TNI greater financial security. They are also a great way to show support for our past work done and our vision for the future. We are committed to the long-term work of the movements.

    Can I contribute in other ways? What about in-kind donations?

    Perhaps you are more interested or able to donate your time and skills. All help is welcome! Please get in touch with our community builder Jess: j.graham@tni.org

    Is it safe and secure to donate using the donation form?

    Mollie is our payment controller. Their privacy policy can be found here: https://www.mollie.com/en/privacy  It states: “We take security extremely seriously. Through rigorous security checks, safe data storage, employee screenings and compliance with every available regulation, we can ensure the safety, stability and reliability of our payment platform. More details can be found at this link https://www.mollie.com/en/features/security

    TNI’s privacy policy: https://www.tni.org/en/page/privacy-policy

    Can I make a donation offline?

    Yes you can make direct transfers yourself by choosing the correct account number below.
    Direct Transfer
    (please mention 'donation')
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Address: De Wittenstraat 25, 1052 AK Amsterdam

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    Office Address Bank: ABNAmro, Gustav Mahlerlaan 10, 1082 PP Amsterdam Netherlands
    Mail Address Bank: ABNAmro, Postbus 90, 1000 AB Amsterdam Netherlands 

    Can I come and give a donation in person?

    Yes, you can make a card payment in the office. Please get in touch with our community builder Jess ( J.graham@tni.org) We have a card machine with iZettle for card payments and also accept cash gift payments.

    Does TNI have an ANBI status?

    Yes TNI is registered with the tax authorities as a public benefit institution (ANBI). See: https://www.tni.org/en/page/tnis-anbi-status

    Can I donate to TNI with any crypto currency?

    Currently TNI does not have the ability to accept crypto currency.

    Why is there a 5 euro/pound/USD/AUD minimum limit?

    There needs to be a minimumn amount set up in the building of the donation platform. The 5 euro minimum limit is to prevent unlawful card testing on our site.

    What happens with the personal data I enter to make a donation?

    We enforce a strict data protection policy and will never give nor sell any information regarding our donors to third parties. The payment information is used by the processor and is not saved by us. Your name and email address will be used to send an email of thanks to you for the donation.

  19. 2016 Annual Report thumbnail image

    Annual Report 2016

    15 September 2017
    Annual report

    In 2016, we witnessed the disturbing consequences of permanent war, neoliberal policies and globalization that have unleashed forces that are shaking the status quo at its roots.  Yet while we may seem pessimists of the intellect, we make up for it with our optimism of will! We continue to draw hope from the social movements which doubled their commitment to the realization of the vision and values that TNI holds dear.

  20. Annual Report 2014

    01 June 2015
    Annual report

    in 2014, we celebrated TNI’s four decades of work with considerable pride. Heart-warming messages poured in, affirming our continued value, relevance and impact. Much has changed, but looking back we can see TNI has consistently accompanied and supported some of the most significant struggles of the times – against military dictatorships, Apartheid, nuclear weapons, Third World debt, structural adjustment programmes, corporate-led globalisation – and continues to do so.

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