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146 items
  1. Extractivism and resistance in North Africa

    • Hamza Hamouchene
    20 November 2019
    Paper

    Northern African countries are key suppliers of natural resources to the global economy, from large- scale oil and gas extraction in Algeria and Tunisia, to phosphate mining in Tunisia and Morocco, to water-intensive agribusiness paired with tourism in Morocco and Tunisia. The commodification of nature and privatisation of resources entailed in these projects has led to serious environmental damages, and forced these countries into a subservient position in the global economy, sustaining and deepening global inequalities.

  2. The Belt and Road Initiative (BRI)

    • Stephanie Olinga-Shannon, Mads Barbesgaard, Pietje Vervest
    29 October 2019
    Paper

    This paper outlines a framing for how to understand the Belt and Road Initiative.

  3. Trends in small-scale fishery in Myanmar: Tenure rights and gender in Mon State and Tanintharyi Division

    • Maria Belen Angeles, Mads Barbesgaard, Jennifer Franco
    12 March 2019
    Paper

    “Fish is the world’s most traded food commodity, and Myanmar is on the cusp of becoming a major international source."

  4. ‘There is no vacant land’

    • Oliver Springate-Baginski
    06 March 2019
    Primer

    This Primer promotes a deeper understanding and appreciation of Myanmar's customary tenure systems, which are under threat from the government's new land policies. It looks at the nature and origin of traditional land and resource use customs and the functions these fulfill in Myanmar's rural communities.

  5. State of Power 2019 cover thumbnail

    Cocaine on Wall Street, The War on Drugs, and Peace in Colombia

    • Jorge Andrés Forero-González , Miranda D. Mosis, Diana María Peña-García
    08 February 2019
    Paper

    This essay connects cocaine, the financial system and global economies through the experience of the war on drugs and peace process in Colombia.

  6. The data of money

    • Andrés Arauz
    28 January 2019
    Paper

    The international bank transfer system, SWIFT, is a form of contemporary digital colonialism and surveillance capitalism as it is run by US firms and provides data to US government agencies. Drives by governments and philanthropists to increase use of digital money will only strengthen it further.

  7. State of Power 2019 cover thumbnail

    Rome: financial power against a city of solidarity

    • Biagio Quattrocchi, Vanessa Bilancetti , Francesco Silvi
    23 January 2019
    Paper

    Rome’s municipality has accumulated enormous debt, creating an emergency used to close any sort of public space, both physical and discussion. The narrative regarding the debt has been used to attack what we call the city of solidarity – groups, associations, and occupied places that are working to build community as opposed to accumulating profit.

  8. Building post-capitalist futures

    27 November 2018
    Paper

    Over several sunny days in June 2018, a diverse group of 60 activists and researchers from 30 countries convened for a multi-day meeting to discuss the collective building of post-capitalist futures. The meeting provided the opportunity for a rich exchange of perspectives and experiences, as well as deep discussion and debate. The goal of the meeting was not to achieve consensus both an impossible and unnecessary endeavour but rather to stimulate mutual learning, challenge one another and advance analyses.

  9. Shrinking Space and The BDS Movement

    • Bina Ahmad, Ben White, Phyllis Bennis
    13 November 2018
    Paper

    A widening pattern of repression of social movements has taken shape around the world. Everywhere, space for dissent is shrinking rapidly. Governments and corporations alike are working to suppress and silence movements, organisations and individuals who organise against repression. This shrinking of public space threatens virtually all social movements. Around the world, the legality, physical safety, and public access of dissident movements and civil society more broadly are being threatened. This report examines the legal and political pressure exerted on the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) Movement, a global campaign aimed at pressuring Israel to end human rights violations, launched in 2005 by a group of Palestinian activists.

  10. Bolivia: The Left in Power

    • Linda Farthing
    02 October 2018
    Paper

    Social movements need to grapple with not only building successful political parties and winning power but also with using that power strategically to best implement change. This report examines the critical role played by Movimiento al Socialismo (MAS) government employees and the challenges they faced in advancing a social and economic justice agenda within Bolivia. How can progressive government employees remain true to their political ideology while ensuring the execution of a professional and fair public bureaucracy?

  11. Financialisation: A Primer

    • Frances Thomson, Sahil Dutta
    13 September 2018
    Primer

    A beginner’s guide to financialisation: how it works, how it shapes our lives, the forces that lie behind it, and how we can resist.

  12. It takes a hurricane... Puerto Rico’s yearning for energy democracy

    • Antonio Carmona Báez
    30 July 2018
    Paper

    On the evening of 22 January 2018, the Governor of Puerto Rico announced the complete privatisation of the island’s power utility. The public statement came four months after hurricanes Irma and Maria, which devastated the archipelago leaving thousands of people homeless or dead and over 40 percent of the population without access to electricity and running water. Puerto Rico’s energy system was crumbling long before the tropical weather systems of September 2017 hit the archipelago. The hurricanes only laid bare the unsustainable conditions of the extremely expensive and fossil fuel-generated electrical power regime.

  13. Populism from above and below: agriculture and the political ambiguities of the Workers’ Party in Brazil

    • Daniela Andrade
    03 July 2018
    Paper

    Brazil has recently undergone a shift from economic growth to recession, as well as from a left-wing, neo-developmentalist politics to one on the far-right, authoritarian and economically ultraliberal. Such an economic and political U-turn touched upon the countryside in contrasting ways. This paper reflects on the politics of the past. It suggests that the road to regression was paved during the tenure of the Worker’s Party (PT), when politics were considered both popular and progressive. And it was under the PT’s rule when the ‘rural world’ mattered the most for politics.

  14. Human rights and drug policy

    • Ernestien Jensema
    18 June 2018
    Primer

    An accessible but comprehensive primer on why TNI believes that human rights must be at the heart of any debate on drug control.

  15. Decriminalise agro-forestry!

    • Oliver Springate-Baginski
    22 May 2018
    Primer

    Shifting cultivation is a form of agro-forestry in which the cultivation of annual agricultural crops is combined with fallowing long enough for trees to grow before the plot is cultivated again. Why is shifting cultivation so controversial, and why do different stake­holders hold such divergent views - for some a valuable and honourable tradition but for others virtually a criminal activity?

  16. Flex Crops: A Primer

    • Jun Borras, Jennifer Franco, S. Ryan Isakson, Les Levidow, Pietje Vervest, Gustavo de L. T. Oliveira, Mindi Schneider, Ben McKay, Sérgio Sauer, Ben Richardson, Roman Herre, Alberto Alonso-Fradejas, Juan Liu, Tania Salerno, Yunan Xu, Markus Kröger
    14 May 2018
    Primer

    What is a flex crop, and what does this mean for food, land, climate, and people?

  17. Leveraging urban policy for food sovereignty and human rights

    • Paula Fernandez-Wulff, Christopher Yap
    08 May 2018
    Paper

    What do booming cities and urban processes mean for the future of food systems?

  18. Environmentalism and authoritarian politics in Vietnam

    • Thieu-Dang Nguyen, Simone Datzberger
    07 May 2018
    Paper

    Popular protests that erupted in Vietnam in 2016 after a toxic spill by a Taiwanese steel factory have shown that environmental-focused campaigns can engage and mobilise the public to resist authoritarian practices, create a cohesive public voice and help build collective power.

  19. Ladakhi girls

    Localisation: a strategic solution to globalised authoritarianism

    • Helena Norberg-Hodge
    05 May 2018
    Paper

    Authoritarian politics have risen in the context of profound political, economic, social and ecological insecurity caused by corporate-led globalisation. The movement for economic localisation has the potential to unite communities, disarm authoritarian politicians, restore democracy and build a real economy based on sustainable use of natural resources.

  20. Disrupting European authoritarianism

    • Nikolai Huke, David Bailey, Mònica Clua-Losada, Julia Lux, Olatz Ribera Almandoz
    02 May 2018
    Paper

    EU institutions and governments responded to the Eurozone crisis with a combination of austerity and authoritarianism that increased precarity and eroded liberal democracy. However, a survey of social movements shows that this technocratic depoliticization was only partially successful as the increasing exclusion of people from democratic decision-making also sparked novel forms of organizing  that have opened up potential avenues for radical social change.

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