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143 items
  1. The Limits of Law

    • Grietje Baars
    29 January 2020
    Paper

    Law is fundamentally limited in its potential to challenge corporations' power and their harm, because the law has been created to facilitate capitalist accumulation and therefore the rights of the property-owning class to force others to submit to its will. It cannot, therefore, be expected to have any emancipatory potential.

  2. Trends in small-scale fishery in Myanmar: Tenure rights and gender in Mon State and Tanintharyi Division

    • Maria Belen Angeles, Mads Barbesgaard, Jennifer Franco
    12 March 2019
    Paper

    “Fish is the world’s most traded food commodity, and Myanmar is on the cusp of becoming a major international source."

  3. The Corporate State

    • Mathias Hein Jessen
    30 January 2020
    Paper

    In order to understand corporate power today, we need to understand their history and how they have always been a fundamental part of how the state has governed and continues to govern social life. 

  4. The data of money

    • Andrés Arauz
    28 January 2019
    Paper

    The international bank transfer system, SWIFT, is a form of contemporary digital colonialism and surveillance capitalism as it is run by US firms and provides data to US government agencies. Drives by governments and philanthropists to increase use of digital money will only strengthen it further.

  5. State of Power 2019 cover thumbnail

    Cocaine on Wall Street, The War on Drugs, and Peace in Colombia

    • Jorge Andrés Forero-González , Miranda D. Mosis, Diana María Peña-García
    08 February 2019
    Paper

    This essay connects cocaine, the financial system and global economies through the experience of the war on drugs and peace process in Colombia.

  6. Fighting for public health

    • Desirée Enlund
    19 January 2018
    Paper

    The rural communities in the Västernorrland county of Northern Sweden are not used to being in the national spotlight, but in 2017 their struggle to stop cutbacks in maternity and emergency care made national news. What are the lessons for all those involved in building counter-power in rural areas of the Global North?

  7. Bolivia: The Left in Power

    • Linda Farthing
    02 October 2018
    Paper

    Social movements need to grapple with not only building successful political parties and winning power but also with using that power strategically to best implement change. This report examines the critical role played by Movimiento al Socialismo (MAS) government employees and the challenges they faced in advancing a social and economic justice agenda within Bolivia. How can progressive government employees remain true to their political ideology while ensuring the execution of a professional and fair public bureaucracy?

  8. Recovering antiracism

    • Azfar Shafi , Ilyas Nagdee
    22 October 2020
    Paper

    2020 has seen antiracism movements gain momentum and push back against institutionalised racism. However, despite the progress made, individualism and fragmentation continue to undermine solidarity and to depoliticise antiracism struggles. This paper explores how we can move towards an antiracist horizon.

  9. Environmentalism and authoritarian politics in Vietnam

    • Thieu-Dang Nguyen, Simone Datzberger
    07 May 2018
    Paper

    Popular protests that erupted in Vietnam in 2016 after a toxic spill by a Taiwanese steel factory have shown that environmental-focused campaigns can engage and mobilise the public to resist authoritarian practices, create a cohesive public voice and help build collective power.

  10. Food politics in a time of crisis: corporate power vs. popular power in the shifting relations of state, society and capital in Venezuela’s food system

    • Ana Felicien, Christina M. Schiavoni, Liccia Romero
    17 March 2018
    Paper

    Shedding light on Venezuela’s current situation, inquiring into food shortages, lines, and ‘riots'.

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    Rome: financial power against a city of solidarity

    • Biagio Quattrocchi, Vanessa Bilancetti , Francesco Silvi
    23 January 2019
    Paper

    Rome’s municipality has accumulated enormous debt, creating an emergency used to close any sort of public space, both physical and discussion. The narrative regarding the debt has been used to attack what we call the city of solidarity – groups, associations, and occupied places that are working to build community as opposed to accumulating profit.

  12. Bright lights, tech city for the no-collar worker

    • Carla Maria Kayanan, Filipa Pajević
    31 January 2020
    Paper

    Every city seems now to be looking for its 'Silicon Valley'. But what's the reality for cities that embrace Big Tech? Exploring two-case studies in Dublin, Ireland and Kitchener-Cambridge-Waterloo in Canada, this essay explores how urban space and public policy is transformed by digital corporations and how the allure far exceeds the concrete benefits.

  13. Viktor Orban

    Lessons from the Political Economy of Authoritarian Capitalism in Hungary

    • Gábor Scheiring
    09 April 2018
    Paper

    Hungary was once praised as an example of successful democratisation and EU integration, but now has joined the ranks of ‘liberal’ nations backsliding into authoritarianism. Many commentators blame Orbán and his anti-migrant, anti-EU populist rhetoric, but ignore the underlying causes in particular the failings of market reforms in the country, high unemployment, low wages, spiraling household debts, and a nationalist capitalist class resentful of the advantages given to their transnational capitalist competitors.

  14. Sentinels of Privilege and the Ressentiment of the Powerful

    • Kurt Shaw, Rita de Cácia Oenning da Silva
    27 April 2018
    Paper

    Through the experience of working with kids from Brazil’s favelas (shanty-towns) telling their stories, two film-makers explore how the rise of the authoritarian right in Brazil is based on a deep fear by elites of social mobility and a desire to preserve their traditional privileges through both physical as well as political walls.

  15. Populism from above and below: agriculture and the political ambiguities of the Workers’ Party in Brazil

    • Daniela Andrade
    03 July 2018
    Paper

    Brazil has recently undergone a shift from economic growth to recession, as well as from a left-wing, neo-developmentalist politics to one on the far-right, authoritarian and economically ultraliberal. Such an economic and political U-turn touched upon the countryside in contrasting ways. This paper reflects on the politics of the past. It suggests that the road to regression was paved during the tenure of the Worker’s Party (PT), when politics were considered both popular and progressive. And it was under the PT’s rule when the ‘rural world’ mattered the most for politics.

  16. Muslim Women don’t need saving

    • Nawal Mustafa
    10 December 2020
    Paper

    Upon declaring a Global War on Terror in 2001, the US administration claimed that the “fight against terrorism was also a fight for the rights and dignity of women”. In the years that followed, western political discourse regularly referred to the need to “free” apparently oppressed Muslim women from the shackles of their religion and way of life, reviving political and societal debates about head coverings, integration, gender equality, secularism, and neutrality.

    Relying on Islamophobic stereotypes, and with no regard for the rights to freedom of expression or freedom of religion, laws and policies were introduced in a number of European countries, which banned the hijab and/ or niqab. In perhaps the most flagrent example of just how entrenched Islamophobia has become, European states, in effect, began legislating on Muslim women’s bodies, dictating which clothes they could or could not wear.

  17. Agricultural livelihoods and voting patterns in a rural, southern state

    • Rebecca Shelton
    17 March 2018
    Paper

    How can we support cross-cultural empathy and an improved understanding of the unique and diverse contexts from which support for authoritarian populism is gained?

  18. On “shrinking space”

    • Ben Hayes, Frank Barat, Isabelle Geuskens, Nick Buxton, Fiona Dove, Francesco Martone, Hannah Twomey, Semanur Karaman
    07 April 2017
    Paper

    Individual and collective activism is facing a global pushback from states, corporations and the Far Right. How useful is the metaphorical concept of ‘shrinking space’ to examine such repression of civic society? This report deconstructs the shrinking space narrative and critiques some of its inherent problems, particularly its conflation with ‘civic space’. Thus a Government can profess support for ‘civic space’ and human rights defender initiatives abroad, while adopting repressive domestic policies and promoting collusion with corporations that contribute to ‘shrinking space’.

  19. People and places left behind: Work, culture and politics in the rural United States

    • Cynthia M. Duncan, Jessica D. Ulrich-Schad
    17 March 2018
    Paper
    How does looking at the rural U.S. from a "three rural americas" perspective helps provide a more nuanced framework for understanding the role of rural residents in current national politics, and especially in the last election?
  20. Land reform, rural development and developmental state policies in South Africa:

    13 October 2017
    Paper

    South Africa’s National Development Plan (NDP) describes the country as a low-growth, middle- income trapped economy, characterised by high inequality, high unemployment, low savings and poor skills levels. It aims to eliminate income poverty and reduce inequality by 2030, and pleads for an integrated and inclusive rural economy and a capable and developmental state to coordinate this effort.

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