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117 items
  1. Revisiting power and powerlessness: Speculating West Virginia’s energy future and the externalities of the socioecologial fix

    • Dylan M. Harris, James McCarthy
    17 March 2018
    Paper

    Is external investment and dispossession in Appalachia a result of China's ‘socioecological fix’ to climatically precarious capitalist development?

  2. Shrinking Space and The BDS Movement

    • Bina Ahmad, Ben White, Phyllis Bennis
    13 November 2018
    Paper

    A widening pattern of repression of social movements has taken shape around the world. Everywhere, space for dissent is shrinking rapidly. Governments and corporations alike are working to suppress and silence movements, organisations and individuals who organise against repression. This shrinking of public space threatens virtually all social movements. Around the world, the legality, physical safety, and public access of dissident movements and civil society more broadly are being threatened. This report examines the legal and political pressure exerted on the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) Movement, a global campaign aimed at pressuring Israel to end human rights violations, launched in 2005 by a group of Palestinian activists.

  3. Land as central in the struggle of Mindanawons (1950’s to the present)

    • Faina C. Abaya-Ulindang, Lloyd B. Ranises
    15 March 2018
    Paper

    Mindanao island is long considered as the Philippines’ backwater and a peace and order problem; what are the causes of insurgency in this area?

  4. Authoritarian populism and neo-extractivism in Bolivia and Ecuador: The unresolved agrarian question and the prospects for food sovereignty as counter-hegemony

    • Mark Tilzey
    17 March 2018
    Paper

    What will happen when revenues from extractivism begin to dry up, and the short-term consumer boom, the welfare payments, and the class alliances that go with them, start to unravel?

  5. Edging Forward

    • Jamie Bridge, Martin Jelsma, Tom Blickman, Marie Nougier, David Bewley-Taylor, Christopher Hallam
    29 September 2017
    Paper

    Diplomatic processes at the United Nations are notoriously slow and difficult, perhaps increasingly so in a modern world of multi-polar geopolitics and tensions. This is certainly no different for the highly charged and provocative issue of international drug control.

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    The World at the Climate Crossroads

    • Praful Bidwai
    02 December 2009
    Paper

    It is depressingly clear that Copenhagen will at best produce a ‘political’ agreement—just as the Bali conference did two years ago—but not a global climate compact with time-bound, quantifiable, legally binding and enforceable goals or measures.

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    New ‘Webs of Power’ and Agrarian Transformations in Cambodia: Where are the women?

    • Clara Mi Young Park
    18 May 2015
    Paper

    In February 2012 Economic Land Concessions granted to private companies in Cambodia totalled 2,033,664 ha., and increased to 2,289,490 ha. by June 2013, covering 63 per cent of the country’s arable land. Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) inflows to Cambodia grew by 73 per cent from 2011 to 2012. The country, together with Myanmar and Vietnam, is referred to as one of the ‘emerging bright spots of the subregion’.

  8. Agricultural livelihoods and voting patterns in a rural, southern state

    • Rebecca Shelton
    17 March 2018
    Paper

    How can we support cross-cultural empathy and an improved understanding of the unique and diverse contexts from which support for authoritarian populism is gained?

  9. Land, populism and rural politics in Zimbabwe

    • Tendai Murisa
    15 March 2018
    Paper

    This paper explores the underlying political-economic characteristics of authoritarian populism at this crucial moment in Zimbabwe’s history.

  10. Authoritarian populism and the challenge to civil society

    • Kimberly Pfeifer, Martin Walsh, Nick Galasso
    17 March 2018
    Paper

    This paper looks into what roles international NGOs can play in an emancipatory rural politics.

  11. Civil Society Statement on the EU-Indonesia Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement (CEPA)

    • Roeline Knottnerus
    28 February 2018
    Paper

    This statement has been developed jointly by Indonesian and European civil society organisations, who believe that an EU-Indonesia Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement (CEPA) must first of all be approached as a means to serve the public interest.

  12. Conservative farmers movements and right-wing populism in contemporary India

    • Divya Jain
    15 March 2018
    Paper

    What are the fundamental tensions and contradictions between the Modi authoritarian populist regime and its rural social base?

  13. Fighting for public health

    • Desirée Enlund
    19 January 2018
    Paper

    The rural communities in the Västernorrland county of Northern Sweden are not used to being in the national spotlight, but in 2017 their struggle to stop cutbacks in maternity and emergency care made national news. What are the lessons for all those involved in building counter-power in rural areas of the Global North?

  14. Wind energy development in Mexico: an authoritarian populist development project?

    • Gerardo A. Torres Contreras
    17 March 2018
    Paper

    What are the current context and consequences of Mexico's wind energy policy in the rural setting of the Isthmus of Tehuantepec?

  15. The EU - Indonesia CEPA negotiations

    • Roeline Knottnerus
    15 February 2018
    Paper

    What drives the negotiations for an Indonesia-Europe Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement (CEPA) in relation to investment? What would be the merits of the alternative investment protection frameworks as proposed by Indonesia? Will it be more effective in promoting a more equitable and sustainable development?

  16. The data of money

    • Andrés Arauz
    28 January 2019
    Paper

    The international bank transfer system, SWIFT, is a form of contemporary digital colonialism and surveillance capitalism as it is run by US firms and provides data to US government agencies. Drives by governments and philanthropists to increase use of digital money will only strengthen it further.

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