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135 items
  1. The EU - Indonesia CEPA negotiations

    • Roeline Knottnerus
    15 February 2018
    Paper

    What drives the negotiations for an Indonesia-Europe Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement (CEPA) in relation to investment? What would be the merits of the alternative investment protection frameworks as proposed by Indonesia? Will it be more effective in promoting a more equitable and sustainable development?

  2. Legitimising an unsustainable approach to trade

    • Ciaran Cross
    01 March 2018
    Paper

    The incorporation of labour, environmental and sustainable development provisions in the EU’s free trade agreements (FTA) has been much debated. But are the overall objectives of these FTAs truly compatible with a meaningful approach to labour rights, environmental protection and sustainable development? If not, what are these provisions actually doing?

  3. Stateless but rooted: Resistance, land and landscape in the occupied Syrian Golan Heights

    • Maria Kastrinou, Salman Fakher Al-Deen, Steven B. Emery
    15 March 2018
    Paper

    Could the struggle against Israeli occupation within this rural vantage on the Middle East offer new insights into the emancipatory potential of agrarian and land-based political movements?

  4. How Public Banks Can Help Finance a Green and Just Energy Transformation

    • Thomas Marois
    15 November 2017
    Paper

    Every day public banks are developing new and innovative ways of financing a green transformation. This issue brief explores the lessons from two public banks, one in Costa Rica  and the other in Germany.

  5. The agrarian origins of authoritarian rural populism in the United States: what can we learn from 20th century struggles in California and the Midwest?

    • Antonio Roman-Alcalá, Maywa Montenegro, Alex Liebman, Siena Chrisman
    15 March 2018
    Paper

    Interrogating the politics of rural places in generating both support for and struggle against authoritarian populism.

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    Randomized controlled trial of dexamphetamine maintenance for methamphetamine dependence

    • Marie Longo, Wendy Wickes, Matthew Smout, Sonia Harrison, Sharon Cahill, Jason M. White
    31 May 2009
    Paper

    This study tested the impact of a long-acting form of amphetamine as medication to help control dependent use of the closely allied stimulant, methamphetamine. Prescribed usually for the treatment of pathological sleepiness or attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, effects of the amphetamine tablets prescribed in the study take several hours longer to emerge than normal amphetamine and last three to six hours longer, giving it a 'smoothing' profile similar to methadone for heroin users; non-rapid onset make it less intensely pleasurable, and longer duration suits it to once-daily administration.

  7. Muslim Women don’t need saving

    • Nawal Mustafa
    10 December 2020
    Paper

    Upon declaring a Global War on Terror in 2001, the US administration claimed that the “fight against terrorism was also a fight for the rights and dignity of women”. In the years that followed, western political discourse regularly referred to the need to “free” apparently oppressed Muslim women from the shackles of their religion and way of life, reviving political and societal debates about head coverings, integration, gender equality, secularism, and neutrality.

    Relying on Islamophobic stereotypes, and with no regard for the rights to freedom of expression or freedom of religion, laws and policies were introduced in a number of European countries, which banned the hijab and/ or niqab. In perhaps the most flagrent example of just how entrenched Islamophobia has become, European states, in effect, began legislating on Muslim women’s bodies, dictating which clothes they could or could not wear.

  8. The twin challenge of agrarian and climate justice

    • Jun Borras, Jennifer Franco, Clara Mi Young Park, Mads Barbesgaard, Yukari Sekine, Ye Lin Myint, Thant Zin
    02 March 2018
    Paper

    Dominant approaches to climate change mitigation are putting new pressures on small farmers and village dwellers, justifying dispossession by powerful actors who cast villagers' traditional ways of life as ecologically destructive or economically inefficient. In order to address the twin challenges of agrarian justice and climate justice, it is critical to understand the way new conflicts and initiatives intersect with old conflicts and the way they are compounded by undemocratic settings, and inequality and division along fault-lines of gender, ethnicity, class, and generation.

  9. Environmentalism and authoritarian politics in Vietnam

    • Thieu-Dang Nguyen, Simone Datzberger
    07 May 2018
    Paper

    Popular protests that erupted in Vietnam in 2016 after a toxic spill by a Taiwanese steel factory have shown that environmental-focused campaigns can engage and mobilise the public to resist authoritarian practices, create a cohesive public voice and help build collective power.

  10. Populism from above and below: agriculture and the political ambiguities of the Workers’ Party in Brazil

    • Daniela Andrade
    03 July 2018
    Paper

    Brazil has recently undergone a shift from economic growth to recession, as well as from a left-wing, neo-developmentalist politics to one on the far-right, authoritarian and economically ultraliberal. Such an economic and political U-turn touched upon the countryside in contrasting ways. This paper reflects on the politics of the past. It suggests that the road to regression was paved during the tenure of the Worker’s Party (PT), when politics were considered both popular and progressive. And it was under the PT’s rule when the ‘rural world’ mattered the most for politics.

  11. Building post-capitalist futures

    27 November 2018
    Paper

    Over several sunny days in June 2018, a diverse group of 60 activists and researchers from 30 countries convened for a multi-day meeting to discuss the collective building of post-capitalist futures. The meeting provided the opportunity for a rich exchange of perspectives and experiences, as well as deep discussion and debate. The goal of the meeting was not to achieve consensus both an impossible and unnecessary endeavour but rather to stimulate mutual learning, challenge one another and advance analyses.

  12. The Limits of Law

    • Grietje Baars
    29 January 2020
    Paper

    Law is fundamentally limited in its potential to challenge corporations' power and their harm, because the law has been created to facilitate capitalist accumulation and therefore the rights of the property-owning class to force others to submit to its will. It cannot, therefore, be expected to have any emancipatory potential.

  13. ‘Junk Agroecology’

    13 October 2020
    Paper

    Agroecology has gained ground in recent years as the need to transform our agrifood system becomes increasingly clear. The food and financial crises of 2008, and the deepening climate and environmental crises, have revealed deep challenges for the way we produce and consume food. Global agrarian justice and food sovereignty movements, organised in global convergences like the Nyéléni Forum, have emphasised the importance of agroecology in this transformation. They highlight the political nature of agroecology: ‘it requires us to challenge and transform structures of power in society'.

  14. Authoritarianism thumbnail image

    Understanding and challenging authoritarianism

    30 November 2017
    Paper

    In June 2017, 35 researchers and activists from 20 countries joined TNI staff in Amsterdam to examine the new wave of authoritarian politics spreading worldwide and how movements committed to social and ecological justice might best challenge it.  This report highlights some of the core themes and debates that emerged.

  15. Fighting for public health

    • Desirée Enlund
    19 January 2018
    Paper

    The rural communities in the Västernorrland county of Northern Sweden are not used to being in the national spotlight, but in 2017 their struggle to stop cutbacks in maternity and emergency care made national news. What are the lessons for all those involved in building counter-power in rural areas of the Global North?

  16. Shrinking Space and The BDS Movement

    • Bina Ahmad, Ben White, Phyllis Bennis
    13 November 2018
    Paper

    A widening pattern of repression of social movements has taken shape around the world. Everywhere, space for dissent is shrinking rapidly. Governments and corporations alike are working to suppress and silence movements, organisations and individuals who organise against repression. This shrinking of public space threatens virtually all social movements. Around the world, the legality, physical safety, and public access of dissident movements and civil society more broadly are being threatened. This report examines the legal and political pressure exerted on the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) Movement, a global campaign aimed at pressuring Israel to end human rights violations, launched in 2005 by a group of Palestinian activists.

  17. Bright lights, tech city for the no-collar worker

    • Carla Maria Kayanan, Filipa Pajević
    31 January 2020
    Paper

    Every city seems now to be looking for its 'Silicon Valley'. But what's the reality for cities that embrace Big Tech? Exploring two-case studies in Dublin, Ireland and Kitchener-Cambridge-Waterloo in Canada, this essay explores how urban space and public policy is transformed by digital corporations and how the allure far exceeds the concrete benefits.

  18. The Immunity of Austerity

    • Luke Shuttleworth
    02 February 2017
    Paper

    The durability of austerity policies in the European Union is due in part to the way neoliberal values such as competition and individual responsibility are perpetuated in popular media. How can movements break this monopoly on information to articulate different values and help mobilise citizens against austerity.

  19. The data of money

    • Andrés Arauz
    28 January 2019
    Paper

    The international bank transfer system, SWIFT, is a form of contemporary digital colonialism and surveillance capitalism as it is run by US firms and provides data to US government agencies. Drives by governments and philanthropists to increase use of digital money will only strengthen it further.

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