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  1. State of Power 2019 cover thumbnail

    Cocaine on Wall Street, The War on Drugs, and Peace in Colombia

    • Jorge Andrés Forero-González , Miranda D. Mosis, Diana María Peña-García
    08 February 2019
    Paper

    This essay connects cocaine, the financial system and global economies through the experience of the war on drugs and peace process in Colombia.

  2. Position Paper of the Fair Trade Cannabis Working Group in the Caribbean

    28 October 2020
    Paper

    The Position Paper "For inclusive business models, well designed laws and fair(er) trade options for small-scale traditional cannabis farmers” produced by The Fair(er) Trade Cannabis Working Group aims to contribute to the debate on finding sustainable and realistic solutions to the challenges posed by the developing cannabis industry, with a special focus on traditional and small scale farmers.

  3. Edging Forward

    • Jamie Bridge, Martin Jelsma, Tom Blickman, Marie Nougier, David Bewley-Taylor, Christopher Hallam
    29 September 2017
    Paper

    Diplomatic processes at the United Nations are notoriously slow and difficult, perhaps increasingly so in a modern world of multi-polar geopolitics and tensions. This is certainly no different for the highly charged and provocative issue of international drug control.

  4. State of Power 2019 cover thumbnail

    Rome: financial power against a city of solidarity

    • Biagio Quattrocchi, Vanessa Bilancetti , Francesco Silvi
    23 January 2019
    Paper

    Rome’s municipality has accumulated enormous debt, creating an emergency used to close any sort of public space, both physical and discussion. The narrative regarding the debt has been used to attack what we call the city of solidarity – groups, associations, and occupied places that are working to build community as opposed to accumulating profit.

  5. On “shrinking space”

    • Ben Hayes, Frank Barat, Isabelle Geuskens, Nick Buxton, Fiona Dove, Francesco Martone, Hannah Twomey, Semanur Karaman
    07 April 2017
    Paper

    Individual and collective activism is facing a global pushback from states, corporations and the Far Right. How useful is the metaphorical concept of ‘shrinking space’ to examine such repression of civic society? This report deconstructs the shrinking space narrative and critiques some of its inherent problems, particularly its conflation with ‘civic space’. Thus a Government can profess support for ‘civic space’ and human rights defender initiatives abroad, while adopting repressive domestic policies and promoting collusion with corporations that contribute to ‘shrinking space’.

  6. Muslim Women don’t need saving

    • Nawal Mustafa
    10 December 2020
    Paper

    Upon declaring a Global War on Terror in 2001, the US administration claimed that the “fight against terrorism was also a fight for the rights and dignity of women”. In the years that followed, western political discourse regularly referred to the need to “free” apparently oppressed Muslim women from the shackles of their religion and way of life, reviving political and societal debates about head coverings, integration, gender equality, secularism, and neutrality.

    Relying on Islamophobic stereotypes, and with no regard for the rights to freedom of expression or freedom of religion, laws and policies were introduced in a number of European countries, which banned the hijab and/ or niqab. In perhaps the most flagrent example of just how entrenched Islamophobia has become, European states, in effect, began legislating on Muslim women’s bodies, dictating which clothes they could or could not wear.

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    Climate Chronicle

    07 December 2009
    Paper

    The Climate justice newspaper is produced every two days during the Copenhagen climate talks, reporting and decoding what is going on both inside and outside the climate negotiations. Find out what is really going on behind the media headlines.

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    Randomized controlled trial of dexamphetamine maintenance for methamphetamine dependence

    • Marie Longo, Wendy Wickes, Matthew Smout, Sonia Harrison, Sharon Cahill, Jason M. White
    31 May 2009
    Paper

    This study tested the impact of a long-acting form of amphetamine as medication to help control dependent use of the closely allied stimulant, methamphetamine. Prescribed usually for the treatment of pathological sleepiness or attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, effects of the amphetamine tablets prescribed in the study take several hours longer to emerge than normal amphetamine and last three to six hours longer, giving it a 'smoothing' profile similar to methadone for heroin users; non-rapid onset make it less intensely pleasurable, and longer duration suits it to once-daily administration.

  9. ‘Junk Agroecology’

    13 October 2020
    Paper

    Agroecology has gained ground in recent years as the need to transform our agrifood system becomes increasingly clear. The food and financial crises of 2008, and the deepening climate and environmental crises, have revealed deep challenges for the way we produce and consume food. Global agrarian justice and food sovereignty movements, organised in global convergences like the Nyéléni Forum, have emphasised the importance of agroecology in this transformation. They highlight the political nature of agroecology: ‘it requires us to challenge and transform structures of power in society'.

  10. Reserves for emancipatory politics in post-war northern Sri Lanka

    • Ahilan Kadirgamar , Niyanthini Kadirgamar
    11 March 2018
    Paper

    Situating questions about neoliberalism, nationalism and populism in Sri Lanka helps to broaden understanding of historical and political developments. Do neoliberal policies emerge in the West and then spread to the Global South, or do neoliberal policies evolve in confrontations with nationalist, populist and other political projects and go through considerable innovation in the Global South?

  11. It takes a hurricane... Puerto Rico’s yearning for energy democracy

    • Antonio Carmona Báez
    30 July 2018
    Paper

    On the evening of 22 January 2018, the Governor of Puerto Rico announced the complete privatisation of the island’s power utility. The public statement came four months after hurricanes Irma and Maria, which devastated the archipelago leaving thousands of people homeless or dead and over 40 percent of the population without access to electricity and running water. Puerto Rico’s energy system was crumbling long before the tropical weather systems of September 2017 hit the archipelago. The hurricanes only laid bare the unsustainable conditions of the extremely expensive and fossil fuel-generated electrical power regime.

  12. From rural livelihoods to agricultural growth

    • Lies Craeynest
    10 February 2009
    Paper

    This paper examines the policies and practices on land of the Department for International Development (DFID) of the United Kingdom. After a market-led approach to land distribution in the 1980s, DFID made some changes towards a rights-based land policy, but this has since regressed.

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    Opening up Markets or Fostering a new Satellite State?

    • Irna Hofman
    18 May 2015
    Paper

    New geopolitical dynamics and the surge for natural resources, such as land, accompany the rise of the BRICS countries in the global arena. In this paper, I discuss the case of Chinese agricultural land investments in the Central Asian state, Tajikistan. Emerging from a Soviet past, Tajikistan seems to be on its way to becoming one of China’s newest satellite states.

  14. Legitimising an unsustainable approach to trade

    • Ciaran Cross
    01 March 2018
    Paper

    The incorporation of labour, environmental and sustainable development provisions in the EU’s free trade agreements (FTA) has been much debated. But are the overall objectives of these FTAs truly compatible with a meaningful approach to labour rights, environmental protection and sustainable development? If not, what are these provisions actually doing?

  15. The Belt and Road Initiative (BRI)

    • Stephanie Olinga-Shannon, Mads Barbesgaard, Pietje Vervest
    29 October 2019
    Paper

    This paper outlines a framing for how to understand the Belt and Road Initiative.

  16. Shrinking Space and The BDS Movement

    • Bina Ahmad, Ben White, Phyllis Bennis
    13 November 2018
    Paper

    A widening pattern of repression of social movements has taken shape around the world. Everywhere, space for dissent is shrinking rapidly. Governments and corporations alike are working to suppress and silence movements, organisations and individuals who organise against repression. This shrinking of public space threatens virtually all social movements. Around the world, the legality, physical safety, and public access of dissident movements and civil society more broadly are being threatened. This report examines the legal and political pressure exerted on the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) Movement, a global campaign aimed at pressuring Israel to end human rights violations, launched in 2005 by a group of Palestinian activists.

  17. Building social muscle to transform food systems

    • Zoe Brent
    12 April 2018
    Paper

    Using local public policy to create social change: what does history tell us?

  18. How Public Banks Can Help Finance a Green and Just Energy Transformation

    • Thomas Marois
    15 November 2017
    Paper

    Every day public banks are developing new and innovative ways of financing a green transformation. This issue brief explores the lessons from two public banks, one in Costa Rica  and the other in Germany.

  19. Ending years of solitude?

    • Christelle Chabaud
    13 October 2017
    Paper

    The issue of land access is at the heart of the more than a half-century long conflict in Colombia. The post-conflict era and article 1 of the peace agreement dedicated to integral rural reform are nurturing hope for more democratic land distribution.

  20. Abolish national security

    • Arun Kundnani
    17 June 2021
    Paper

    In this publication Arun Kundnani argues that a politics of abolitionism offers the best approach to overcoming the failures of US national security policy. More than calls to abolish individual national security agencies, abolitionism offers a conceptual framework within which the concept of security can be rethought and actions taken towards a deep transformation of policy-making.

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