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154 items
  1. Methamphetamine use in Myanmar, Thailand, and Southern China: assessing practices, reducing harms

    • Renaud Cachia, Thura Myint Lwin
    18 February 2019
    Policy briefing

    Over the past decade, methamphetamine use has grown more popular in Myanmar, Thailand and Southern China. Based on in-depth interviews conducted with individuals who use methamphetamine, this briefing sheds light on the importance of promoting an environment that reinforces, rather than undermines, the ability of people who use methamphetamine to regulate their drug use, preserve their health and adopt safer practices.

  2. The Challenges of Medicinal Cannabis in Colombia

    • Nicolás Martínez Rivera
    29 October 2019
    Policy briefing

    In July 2016, the Colombian government enacted Law 1787, which regulates the use of medicinal cannabis and its trade in the country. With this decision and a series of subsequent resolutions, Colombia joined the more than a dozen countries that have put into practice different types of regulation to explore the advantages of this plant as an alternative pharmaceutical.

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    Public Public Partnerships

    01 January 2015
    Topic

    TNI is advocating Public Public Partnerships (PUP) as an alternative policy to privatisation or to Public-Private Partnerships in water services as well as a concrete tool to work with partners to reform public water companies/utilities, improve services and realise the right to water on the ground. A public-public partnership (PUP) is simply collaboration between two or more public authorities or organizations, based on solidarity, to improve the capacity and effectiveness of one partner in providing public water or sanitation services. They have been described as a “peer relationship forged around common values and objectives, which exclude profit-seeking”. PUPs avoid the risks which are typically encountered in public-private partnerships: transaction costs, contract failure, renegotiation, the complexities of regulation, commercial opportunism, monopoly pricing, commercial secrecy, currency risk, and lack of public legitimacy. In general the objectives of PUPs are to improve the capacity of the assisted partner. In practice, PUPs' work can be divided into five broad categories: training and developing human resources, technical support on a wide range of issues, improving efficiency and building institutional capacity, financing water services, improving participation. Public Community Partnerships Public-communitarian partnerships (PCPs) are internationally referred to as public-public partnerships but PCPs has a stronger connotation of community. While government and public water authorities should adopt and implement a water delivery policy that prioritises serving the needs of rural communities, many state-owned utilities fail to serve hard-to-reach areas. Community-based water systems are bridging the gap in water service delivery in many parts of Asia, Africa, and Latin America. TNI has observed new forms of partnerships between public authorities and rural communities, in which the communities are engaged in the decision-making about water solutions, supported with public funding and expertise and are empowered to take responsibility for running water systems. Such partnerships can bring rapid and lasting improvements.

  4. Democratic Public Services

    01 January 2015
    Topic
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    Debating Europe Series

    01 January 2014
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    Asia Europe Peoples' Forum

    01 January 2014
    Topic
  7. At the crossroads - Europe’s movements respond

    01 January 2014
    Topic

    Analysis by and for the European social movements acting against the EU crisis regime. European social movements inform what strategic lessons can be learned from resistance, the challenges we face and how to be prepared for upcoming struggles.

  8. Selling the Silk Road Spirit

    07 November 2019
    Policy briefing

    This briefing aims to deepen discussion on the Belt and Road Iniatiative (BRI) in Myanmar. The BRI is often described as a ‘grand strategy’ led by President Xi Jinping, centrally planned and rolled out by obedient state-owned enterprises (SOEs). The sheer size of the initiative – 136 countries have received US$90 billion in Chinese foreign direct investment and exchanged US$6 trillion in trade with China - can make the BRI appear monolithic and inevitable. However, using a political economy analysis, this briefing demonstrates that the BRI is not a grand strategy, but a broad framework of activities that seek to address a crisis in Chinese capitalism. An examination of four BRI projects in Myanmar using Chinese language sources shows the extent of lobbying by Chinese SOEs and the Yunnan provincial government to promote the projects, with support from the central Chinese government.

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    Border Wars II

    • Mark Akkerman
    19 December 2016
    Policy briefing

    This briefing updates the July 2016 report ‘Border Wars: the arms dealers profiting from Europe’s refugee tragedy’ . It shows that the European policy response to the refugee tragedy continues to provide a booming border security market for Europe’s arms and security firms, some of whom are involved in selling arms to the Middle East and North Africa and all of whom encourage European policies focused on keeping refugees out. It’s a win-win for the security corporations, but the cost is a deadly toll for migrants forced into ever more dangerous routes as they flee wars, conflict and oppression.

  10. Cannabis in the City

    • Tom Blickman, Katie Sandwell
    20 March 2019
    Policy briefing

    In order to better understand the situation around, and possibilities for, local and regional cannabis regulation, a series of six country reports were developed. The country reports provide detailed information about the state of cannabis policy, and the possibilities for change, within each country. This briefing identifies some of the key findings and implications for policy makers and advocates from this research.

  11. Shan Market in Pyin Oo Lwin

    Myanmar Commentary

    01 January 2015
    Topic

    In addition to TNI’s regular Briefing and Report series, these Myanmar commentaries are intended to contribute to broader understanding to the many challenges facing the country and its peoples. 

    See the complete list of all the Myanmar commentaries.

    These commentaries are part of a TNI project funded by Sweden. These commentaries are part of a TNI project funded by Sweden. Opinions expressed by authors are not necessarily the views of the donor.

  12. Myths and risks of the EU-Myanmar Investment Protection Agreement

    • Cecilia Olivet, Pietje Vervest
    21 September 2017
    Policy briefing

    As the signing of the EU-Myanmar Investment Protection Agreement (IPA) draws near, concerns over the secrecy surrounding the agreement’s negotiations and the risks it poses abound, alongside many myths about its potential benefits.

  13. Sons and Daughters of the Earth

    • Food First, Alberto Alonso-Fradejas
    16 April 2013
    Policy briefing

    In the face of violent dispossession and incorporation into an exploitative labor regime, indigenous peasant families in northern Guatemala are struggling to access land and defend their resources as the basis of their collective identity.

  14. Harvesting Crops Nigeria - image by Yosef Hadar World Bank

    Bottom Up Accountability and Securing Communal Land Rights in Cross River State

    01 October 2017
    Policy briefing

    Communities in Cross River State, Nigeria are losing access to the forest lands on which they depend for their livelihoods.

  15. Morocco and Cannabis

    • Tom Blickman
    15 March 2017
    Policy briefing

    Is the aim of reducing cannabis cultivation realistic or beneficial for Morocco? What would it actually mean for the major production area the Rif – one of the poorest, most densely populated and environmentally fragile regions in the country? This briefing will give some historical background, discuss developments in the cannabis market, and highlight environmental and social consequences as well as the recent debate about regulation in Morocco and European policies.

  16. stand on guard after burning a coca laboratory near Tumaco, Colombia, in the southwest state of Narino, June,8, 2008,

    Drugs & Conflict

    15 August 2017
    Topic
    Initially focusing on coca producing areas in the Andean Region, TNI's work on Drugs & Conflict has since expanded to cover the world’s main opium producing areas with a focus on Myanmar and Afghanistan. Over the past two decades, TNI staff has worked extensively with local organisations and researchers to advocate for more inclusive, effective and humane approaches to drug related issues in these conflict situations, while analysing the links between drug use, production, and conflict and what these mean for efforts to promote peaceful and just societies. TNI also focuses on promoting the rights of local communities involved in the cultivation of crops declared illicit, and their involvement in drug policy making, the peace process and the design and implementation of development programmes.
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    UN Common Position on drug policy - Consolidating system-wide coherence

    • Martin Jelsma
    03 December 2019
    Policy briefing

    In November 2018, the UN System Chief Executives Board for Coordination adopted the ‘UN system common position supporting the implementation of the international drug control policy through effective inter-agency collaboration’, expressing the shared drug policy principles of all UN organisations and committing them to speak with one voice.

  18. Cannabis in Latin America and the Caribbean

    • Alejandro Corda , Mariano Fusero
    15 March 2017
    Policy briefing

    Cannabis (or marihuana) is one of the most widely consumed psychoactive substances in the world. According to the United Nations World Drug Report, 183 million people, or 3.8% of the world’s population, used cannabis in 2014. Its cultivation was also reported by 129 countries. Cannabis is subject to the United Nations System for International Control of Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic Substances (hereafter “drugs”) and is the most widely consumed of all the drugs. According to that control system, cannabis is among the substances with the strictest legal status; they are the most prohibited, supposedly because of the harm they cause and their lack of medical usefulness.

  19. Paraguay: The cannabis breadbasket of the Southern Cone

    • Guillermo Garat
    03 October 2016
    Policy briefing

    Paraguay is the principal producer of cannabis in South America. Despite its importance as a supplier of cannabis in South America, there has been a surprising absence of serious studies of its impact on its own society, and on the play of offer and demand in neighbouring countries.

  20. Dismantle Corporate Power

    01 January 2015
    Topic

    The initiative to build a global campaign to dismantle corporate power and end TNCs’ impunity came from the network of organizations, movements, campaigns and affected communities that built the campaign process on European TNCs in Latin America together with the Permanent People’s Tribunal (PPT) and the Bi-regional Europe-Latin America and the Caribbean Enlazando Alternativas Network. Since late 2011, organisations from the network together with campaign organisations from different global regions have been promoting the campaign-building process. As of June 2012, over 100 organisations and movements from around the world have signed on to the campaign. For more information go to the website of Dismantle Corporate Power

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