Search results

129 items
  1. jamaica-flag

    Drug law reform in Jamaica

    01 January 2015
    Topic

    As an island that is viewed as the mecca of cannabis culture, many are surprised to learn that Jamaica is only now in the midst of reforming its cannabis laws. The cultivation, selling, and consumption of cannabis as all other drugs have been illegal since 1913. However, following a unanimous symbolic vote in the Jamaican House of Representatives last October, the Jamaican government announced in June 2014 that it would decriminalise marijuana possession for personal consumption and religious/medical use by the end of the year. In January 2015, Justice minister Mark Golding introduced a Bill that in addittion to decriminalizing the possession of ganja up to two ounces, it would establish a cannabis licensing authority to regulate cultivation, sale and distribution for medical, scientific and therapeutic purposes. The Bill passed both in Senate and House of Representatives on February 2015.

  2. Cannabis

    01 January 2015
    Topic

    The status of cannabis in the UN drug conventions is controversial. It is now scheduled among the most dangerous substances. How and why did cannabis get in the conventions? Does it belong there? What are the options to review the status of cannabis according to current scientific data? Is making cannabis subject to a control regime similar to harmful substances like alcohol and tobacco a solution?

  3. Other ways to donate

    02 August 2010
    Topic

    Direct Transfer

    TNI also accepts direct bank transfers in three different currencies.

    (please mention 'donation')
    Name: Stichting Transnational Institute
    
Address: De Wittenstraat 25, 1052 AK Amsterdam

    Office Address Bank: ABNAmro, Gustav Mahlerlaan 10, 1082 PP Amsterdam Netherlands
    Mail Address Bank: ABNAmro, Postbus 90, 1000 AB Amsterdam Netherlands 

    Liberapay

    To make a regular donation to TNI, consider using Liberapay




    Phone app

    Why Donate

    TNI also gratefully accepts donations via Whydonate, a Dutch-language app for Android or IOS phones. Download Whydonate and search for Transnational Institute.

    In person

    If you wish to donate in person, we can accept cash or card payments at our office:

    De Wittenstraat 25
    1052 AK Amsterdam
    (Please contact us for an appointment before visiting)

     
  4. Thumbnail

    For a EU Just Investment Policy

    01 January 2014
    Topic
  5. Donate to TNI

    02 August 2010
    Topic
  6. BRICS Initiative for Critical Agrarian Studies (BICAS)

    01 January 2015
    Topic

    The BRICS Initiative for Critical Agrarian Studies (BICAS) is a collective of largely BRICS-based or connected academic researchers concerned with understanding the BRICS countries and their implications for global agrarian transformations. Critical theoretical and empirical questions about the origins, character and significance of complex changes underway need to be investigated more systematically.

  7. Harvesting Crops Nigeria - image by Yosef Hadar World Bank

    Initiatives to Claim Tenure Rights in Sub-Saharan Africa

    27 September 2015
    Topic

    The 'Bottom-up Accountability Initiatives to Claim Tenure Rights in Sub-Saharan Africa' project was a multi-year many-partner endeavour: FIAN, ISS, PLAAS (the institute for Poverty, Land, and Agrarian Studies at the University of the Western Cape, South Africa), and TNI collaborated with local partners in Nigeria (ERA/Friends of the Earth Nigeria), Mali (CNOP- Coordination Nationale des Organisations Paysannes), Uganda (Katosi Women Development Trust), and SouthAfrica (Masifundise Development Trust). The project focused on Action Research, carried out by the country partners, working with communities of peasants and fishers whose access to land or resources (including fisheries) were being threatened by land, water, and resource grabbing. The project sought to find ways that these communities could use the Voluntary Guidelines on the Responsible Governance of the Tenure of Land, Fisheries, and Forests (VGGTs or TGs), an international soft law instrument endorsed by the UN Committee on Food Security in 2012, to strengthen their rights and push for bottom-up accountability.

  8. Thumbnail

    Public Public Partnerships

    01 January 2015
    Topic

    TNI is advocating Public Public Partnerships (PUP) as an alternative policy to privatisation or to Public-Private Partnerships in water services as well as a concrete tool to work with partners to reform public water companies/utilities, improve services and realise the right to water on the ground. A public-public partnership (PUP) is simply collaboration between two or more public authorities or organizations, based on solidarity, to improve the capacity and effectiveness of one partner in providing public water or sanitation services. They have been described as a “peer relationship forged around common values and objectives, which exclude profit-seeking”. PUPs avoid the risks which are typically encountered in public-private partnerships: transaction costs, contract failure, renegotiation, the complexities of regulation, commercial opportunism, monopoly pricing, commercial secrecy, currency risk, and lack of public legitimacy. In general the objectives of PUPs are to improve the capacity of the assisted partner. In practice, PUPs' work can be divided into five broad categories: training and developing human resources, technical support on a wide range of issues, improving efficiency and building institutional capacity, financing water services, improving participation. Public Community Partnerships Public-communitarian partnerships (PCPs) are internationally referred to as public-public partnerships but PCPs has a stronger connotation of community. While government and public water authorities should adopt and implement a water delivery policy that prioritises serving the needs of rural communities, many state-owned utilities fail to serve hard-to-reach areas. Community-based water systems are bridging the gap in water service delivery in many parts of Asia, Africa, and Latin America. TNI has observed new forms of partnerships between public authorities and rural communities, in which the communities are engaged in the decision-making about water solutions, supported with public funding and expertise and are empowered to take responsibility for running water systems. Such partnerships can bring rapid and lasting improvements.

  9. Drugs Scheduling

    01 January 2015
    Topic

    A more refined distinction is required to define appropriate drug control measures according to the specific characteristics of drug substances, their health risks, the dynamics of their markets and their user groups. The existing classification schedules for drugs from the UN 1961 and 1971 Conventions do not provide sufficient differentiation. The consideration of such diverse substances as coca, cocaine, cannabis, opium and heroin in the same schedule, hampers effective policy responses that can properly take into account the different properties of drugs and the reasons people use them.

  10. Alternative Development

    01 January 2014
    Topic

    Alternative Development programmes, aimed at encouraging peasants to switch from growing illicit drugs-related crops, play an important role in UN drug control strategies. The record of success, however, is a questionable one. Decades of efforts to reduce global drug supply, using a combination of developmental and repressive means, managed to shift production from one country to another, but have failed in terms of global impact. TNI argues for de-linking alternative development from the threat of forced eradication and law enforcement and guaranteeing peasants the support required for a sustainable alternative future.

  11. Drug law reform in Ecuador

    01 January 2015
    Topic

    Like in other countries in the region, drug control measures by the government of Ecuador have been modeled after the pressure and interests of the United States. Even though the country is an important hub for the transit of illicit drugs and chemical supplies, as well as for money laundering, trafficking is not perceived as a significant threat. This is also the case because the cultivation of coca is minimal compared to other countries in the region such as Colombia, Peru and Bolivia. Paradoxically, Ecuador has one of the most severe drug legislations in Latin America.

  12. Drug Policy in Myanmar

    01 January 2015
    Topic

    In Myanmar, TNI has long focused on opium production and its relation with drug policies in the country. Together with civil society organisations, such as the Myanmar Opium Farmers Forum, TNI analyses and proposes alternatives to repressive supply reduction policies, including forced eradication, whose socio-economic repercussions are mainly endured by poppy growing communities residing in areas afflicted by conflict and poverty. In advancing drug law reform in Myanmar, TNI works closely with local organisations including the Drug Policy Advocacy Group (DPAG) Myanmar, to promote human rights and harm reduction for people who use drugs.

  13. Thumbnail

    BITS

    01 January 2014
    Topic

    Bilateral Investment Treaties (BITs) are intended to regulate the commercial investment relationships between two countries. These are supposed to facilitate trade and investment by providing security for investments. However, it is common practice for BITS to establish ISDS mechanisms that allow for transnational companies to sue the states in which they operate based on a very broad interpretation of damage to investments. This has led to a surge in litigations against states and prompted a growing number of governments to seek to cancel or amend existing BITs.

  14. War on Drugs

    01 January 2015
    Topic

    The war on drugs is waged at its worst in the source zone of production. Major consumer countries - the US in particular - think they are able to tackle drug consumption at home by reducing the supply from the "source zones" such as the Andean region - Colombia, Bolivia and Peru - and Central and South-East Asia - Afghanistan and Burma. The primary goal of the supply reduction strategies is to decrease the amount of drugs entering the major consuming countries and subsequently, because the strategy allegedly leads to higher prices that would lead to lower demand.

  15. Drugs Regulation

    01 January 2015
    Topic

    Consensus is growing that the prohibition on production, supply, and use of certain drugs has not only failed to deliver its intended goals but has been counterproductive. Evidence is mounting that this policy has not only exacerbated many public health problems, but has created a much larger set of social harms associated with the criminal market such as violence, corruption, organised crime, and endemic violence.

  16. Drug law reform in Venezuela

    01 January 2010
    Topic

    In 1993, Venezuela replaced prison sentences with ‘social security measures’ for possession of up to 2 grams of cocaine and 20 grams of cannabis. Possession for personal use is punished with referral to treatment, which can still lead to obligatory internment in specialized centers.

  17. Idomeni 26 march 2017

    EU security policies

    25 October 2016
    Topic

    The European Union has a common Security and Defence Policy that sets the agenda on border control and crisis management within the EU as well as how the union responds to global security challenges such as climate change. In addition, many of the EU member states are major military powers in their own right, home to some of the largest arms companies.

  18. 'Green Economy'

    01 January 2015
    Topic

    A 'Green Economy' is defined as an economy that reduces impact on the environment. Many advocates promote pricing mechanisms for valuing nature as a key way to factor in environmental costs into the economy that are otherwise externalised and ignored. While this may sound a good idea in theory, in practice this ends up extending corporate control into new areas from forestry to biodiversity and even the air (carbon trading), often denying access and undermining the control of marginalised communities.

  19. Drug law reform in Chile

    01 January 2015
    Topic

    Chile is progressively reforming its drug laws, especially under Michelle Bachelet’s new administration. These proposals recognise that there is a growing international tendency to view drug policy in a new lens, one that is based upon health considerations and empirical research. Recent proposals include reassessing the categorisation of cannabis as a Class A drug and implementing regulations regarding the quantities that would be allowed for personal use.

  20. Carbon Trading

    01 January 2014
    Topic

    Carbon trading, or the trading of permits to pollute, is a market-based approach for reducing carbon emissions which is deeply flawed, ineffective and unjust. Seeking to turn carbon in the atmosphere into a privatised commodity has created markets susceptible to corporate pressure, distracted from the systemic changes needed to convert our economies, and inflicted injustices on marginalised communities in North that become trapped in pollution hotspots and peasant communities in the South who have been dispossessed of land and livelihoods in the name of climate action.

Pages