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34 items
  1. Cannabis

    01 January 2015
    Topic

    The status of cannabis in the UN drug conventions is controversial. It is now scheduled among the most dangerous substances. How and why did cannabis get in the conventions? Does it belong there? What are the options to review the status of cannabis according to current scientific data? Is making cannabis subject to a control regime similar to harmful substances like alcohol and tobacco a solution?

  2. Free Trade Agreements (FTAs)

    01 January 2015
    Topic
  3. TNI dandelion

    Fellowship

    01 January 2013
    Topic

    TNI Fellows are internationalist intellectuals with a track record of progressive activist-scholarship and a passionate commitment to social change. They bring TNI vision and new ideas, expertise relevant to current programme, connect TNI to relevant networks and commit themselves to an active role in TNI. TNI Fellowships do not involve any financial remuneration.



     

    Associates

  4. Protest Berlin, Trudeau visit  in Berlin 17 Feb 2017

    CETA

    01 January 2015
    Topic

    The Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) is a proposed free trade agreement between Canada and the European Union. The negotiations for CETA concluded on August 1, 2014, but its completion and ratification is expected to take at least two years, due to the number of parties involved. Many sections of the agreement have been severely criticised, in particular its Investor-State Dispute Settlement processes (ISDS) and its likely negative implications for the environment.

  5. Drug law reform in Mexico

    01 January 2013
    Topic

    Mexico is the Latin American country that has bore the highest costs from the War on Drugs, suffering from high national rates of violence, corruption in state institutions, and an increase in the power of organised crime groups. As with other countries in the region, implementation of a prohibitionist drug law approach has had the adverse effect of increasing the number of people held in prison for minor drug offences. This page summarises the latest developments in the debate on drug law and drug policy in Mexico.

  6. Legacy

    01 January 2010
    Topic

    A legacy gift (or Gift in Will) is one of the most significant and lasting contributions you can make to an organization such as TNI.

    Once you secure the well-being of your loved ones, you may choose to include in your will a significant donation to one or more charitable organisations you believe in. If important changes occur in your life, you can always modify your will according to your situation.

    We ask you to think about the things you are passionate about in life and to help sustain them into the future. You can leave a long lasting legacy by remembering TNI in your estate.

    If we only had the resources of those we are up against, we could change the world. 

     - Susan George

    The Transnational institute is registered with the Dutch tax authorities as a ‘Public Service Organization’ (ANBI). This means we do not have to pay inheritance or gift tax on the bequests or donations we receive. That means every euro you contribute goes directly to TNI.

    If you decide to leave a gift in your will to the Transnational Institute we would love to hear from you so we can say thank you and keep you up to date with our work. We can also keep you informed of any upcoming events that may be of interest to you, or even set up a meeting if you would like.

    Should you choose to make a legacy donation, you are under no obligation to inform us, but of course we would love to express our gratitude for your genoristy. We can assure you your decision will be held in the strictest confidence and not be considered a binding commitment.

    We understand gifts in will are big decisions requiring careful consideration. If you have any questions or queries, please contact our Community Builder j.graham@tni.org.


     

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    Public Public Partnerships

    01 January 2015
    Topic

    TNI is advocating Public Public Partnerships (PUP) as an alternative policy to privatisation or to Public-Private Partnerships in water services as well as a concrete tool to work with partners to reform public water companies/utilities, improve services and realise the right to water on the ground. A public-public partnership (PUP) is simply collaboration between two or more public authorities or organizations, based on solidarity, to improve the capacity and effectiveness of one partner in providing public water or sanitation services. They have been described as a “peer relationship forged around common values and objectives, which exclude profit-seeking”. PUPs avoid the risks which are typically encountered in public-private partnerships: transaction costs, contract failure, renegotiation, the complexities of regulation, commercial opportunism, monopoly pricing, commercial secrecy, currency risk, and lack of public legitimacy. In general the objectives of PUPs are to improve the capacity of the assisted partner. In practice, PUPs' work can be divided into five broad categories: training and developing human resources, technical support on a wide range of issues, improving efficiency and building institutional capacity, financing water services, improving participation. Public Community Partnerships Public-communitarian partnerships (PCPs) are internationally referred to as public-public partnerships but PCPs has a stronger connotation of community. While government and public water authorities should adopt and implement a water delivery policy that prioritises serving the needs of rural communities, many state-owned utilities fail to serve hard-to-reach areas. Community-based water systems are bridging the gap in water service delivery in many parts of Asia, Africa, and Latin America. TNI has observed new forms of partnerships between public authorities and rural communities, in which the communities are engaged in the decision-making about water solutions, supported with public funding and expertise and are empowered to take responsibility for running water systems. Such partnerships can bring rapid and lasting improvements.

  8. Protest Hannover 23 April 2016

    TTIP

    01 January 2016
    Topic

    The Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) is a proposed free trade agreement, in negotiation, between the United States and the European Union. Its proponents claim that the agreement will benefit consumers with lower prices, increased competition and more jobs.
    However, very little of the TTIP deals with trade; the vast majority of the agreement relates to government regulations and will therefore have huge implications in matters such as food sovereignty, digital rights and the environment. It will limit the capacity of governments and local groups to regulate and increase the capacity of transnational corporations to act with impunity. TNI’s focus for TTIP and other free trade agreements is on the investment chapter, and particularly the problems caused by Investor-State Dispute Settlement (ISDS) mechanisms that allow corporations to sue governments for actions that affect their profits.

  9. Trade and Investment Agreements in Colombia

    01 January 2013
    Topic

    TNI has long been an advocate for trade and investment policies that prioritise people and the environment over corporate interests. In the case of Colombia, TNI has worked closely with local activists and researchers in analysing and proposing alternatives to free trade agreements that are implemented at the expense of basic human and environmental needs, mainly in relation to the FTA EU-Colombia. In doing so, TNI works on different sectors and communities that are affected by bilateral and multilateral agreements.

  10. The Drug Law Reform - Expert Seminars

    01 January 2015
    Topic

    The Drug Law Reform project organises a series of expert seminars, drug policy briefings and informal drug policy dialogues. The activities serve to cross-fertilise policy debates between countries and regions, stimulating participants to exchange experiences and learn lessons between policy officials, representatives from international agencies and nongovernmental experts and practitioners. Seminars are held under Chatham House Rule to ensure confidentiality and to allow participants a free exchange of ideas.

  11. Informal Drug Policy Dialogues

    01 January 2015
    Topic

    In 2004 the Transnational Institute (TNI) and the Andreas G. Papandreou Foundation (APF) started an Informal Drug Policy Dialogue. Purpose of the dialogues is to have an open-minded exchange of views on current dilemmas in international drug policy making and discuss strategies on how contradictions might be resolved. The meetings are guided by 'Chatham House Rule' to encourage a free exchange of thoughts and confidentiality. In 2007, TNI and the Washington Office on Latin America (WOLA) started a Latin American Informal Drug Policy Dialogue. In 2009, TNI and the German Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) started a series of drug policy dialogues in Southeast Asia.

  12. FAQ

    19 June 2010
    Topic

    Gifts and Donations FAQs

    What is the Transnational Institute?

    The Transnational Institute (TNI) is an international research and advocacy institute committed to building a just, democratic and sustainable planet. For more than 40 years, TNI has served as a unique nexus between social movements, engaged scholars and policy makers.

    When was the Institute founded?

    The Transnational Institute was founded in 1974 as the international programme of the Washington DC-based Institute for Policy Studies.
    You can find an overview of the history of TNI here: https://www.tni.org/en/page/history

    What are the institute's research areas?

    The programmes we currently focus on are listed here https://www.tni.org/en/programmes

    Does the Institute publicise the names of its donors and contributors?

    TNI protects the names and contact information of its private donors in accordance with our privacy policy. The finance section of the annual report has a list of the organisational funders from the year before.

    How can I donate?

    Our Support section offers several tailored options, such as one-time donations or recurring donations. Via the payment form you can choose to make either a one-off donation or set up a recurring direct debit (Monthly or Yearly) . You can pay by PayPal, iDeal, credit card or Sofort.

    We currently use Mollie to process payments.

    You can also make payments via the Whydonate app, available on Android and Iphone.

    Who can I speak with if I have questions?

    If you want advice regarding a gift or donation please send an email to our community builder Jess Graham: J.graham@tni.org. If you would like her to phone you, you can state your availability and she will be happy to give you a call.

    Can I make a donation as a gift for someone else?

    Yes, if you have given a donation and would like a letter of thanks in another person's name we will happily provide this for you. Email Jess Graham: j.graham@tni.org

    How much of my donation goes to TNI?

    Our payment controller collects payments safely, incurring a small charge for each transaction (as described below). The remainder of your donation goes entirely to TNI.

     

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    Is TNI an NGO?

    TNI has special NGO consultative status with UN Ecosoc since 1974, is registered as a non-profit foundation with the Dutch Chamber of Commerce, and has charitable status in the Netherlands. TNI is also recognised as an independent, non-profit research centre in The Netherlands and at European Union level. It is an Associate Member of the International Social Science Council and the European Association of Development Institutes.

    
Where can I see the annual report?

    Our 2018 annual report can be found here.
    As an open and transparent organisation we share all our goals and finances by making our annual report availabile for each year. Audited accounts can be found here: https://www.tni.org/en/page/finances

    How is TNI supported?

    TNI is a non profit organisation which means that it relies completely on external grants and donations. Currently we receive grants from funders to continue our work in specific areas. See: https://www.tni.org/en/page/finances.

    How will my donation support TNI?

    Our donors are crucial to our work. Your donation will help TNI continue to stand up for peace, justice and sustainability where it matters most.

    Your gift supports our activists, organisers, writers and office staff to continue making a difference. There are many ways to support us whether it be a donation, by sharing our reports or coming to one of our events.

    Donations from people like you help to sustain us. The gifts and actions of our supporters give TNI greater financial security. They are also a great way to show support for our past work and our vision for the future. We are committed to the long-term work of the movements.

    Can I contribute in other ways? What about in-kind donations?

    Perhaps you are more interested or able to donate your time and skills. All help is welcome! Please get in touch with our community builder Jess: j.graham@tni.org

    Is it safe and secure to donate using the donation form?

    Mollie is our payment controller. Their privacy policy can be found here: https://www.mollie.com/en/privacy  It states: “We take security extremely seriously. Through rigorous security checks, safe data storage, employee screenings and compliance with every available regulation, we can ensure the safety, stability and reliability of our payment platform. More details can be found at this link https://www.mollie.com/en/features/security

    TNI’s privacy policy: https://www.tni.org/en/page/privacy-policy

    Can I make a donation offline?

    Yes you can make direct transfers, please contact Jess Graham for bank details. 

    Can I come and give a donation in person?

    Yes, you can make a card or cash payment at our office. Please get in touch with our community builder Jess ( J.graham@tni.org) to make an appointment.

    Does TNI have an ANBI status?

    Yes TNI is registered with the Dutch tax authorities as a public benefit institution (ANBI). See: https://www.tni.org/en/page/tnis-anbi-status

    Can I donate to TNI with any crypto currency?

    TNI does not currently accept donations by crypto currency.

    Why is there a 5 euro/pound/USD/AUD minimum limit?

    The minimum limit is to prevent unlawful card testing on our site.

    What happens with the personal data I enter to make a donation?

    We enforce a strict data protection policy. Payment information is used by the processor and is not saved by us. Your name and email address will be used only to send a thank you email for your donation.

  13. Drug law reform in Venezuela

    01 January 2010
    Topic

    In 1993, Venezuela replaced prison sentences with ‘social security measures’ for possession of up to 2 grams of cocaine and 20 grams of cannabis. Possession for personal use is punished with referral to treatment, which can still lead to obligatory internment in specialized centers.

  14. At the crossroads - Europe’s movements respond

    01 January 2014
    Topic

    Analysis by and for the European social movements acting against the EU crisis regime. European social movements inform what strategic lessons can be learned from resistance, the challenges we face and how to be prepared for upcoming struggles.

  15. Drugs Regulation

    01 January 2015
    Topic

    Consensus is growing that the prohibition on production, supply, and use of certain drugs has not only failed to deliver its intended goals but has been counterproductive. Evidence is mounting that this policy has not only exacerbated many public health problems, but has created a much larger set of social harms associated with the criminal market such as violence, corruption, organised crime, and endemic violence.

  16. Drugs Scheduling

    01 January 2015
    Topic

    A more refined distinction is required to define appropriate drug control measures according to the specific characteristics of drug substances, their health risks, the dynamics of their markets and their user groups. The existing classification schedules for drugs from the UN 1961 and 1971 Conventions do not provide sufficient differentiation. The consideration of such diverse substances as coca, cocaine, cannabis, opium and heroin in the same schedule, hampers effective policy responses that can properly take into account the different properties of drugs and the reasons people use them.

  17. Energy Democracy

    01 January 2016
    Topic

    People across the world are taking back power over the energy sector, kicking-back against the rule of the market and re-imagining how energy might be produced, distributed and used. How can the concept of energy democracy be deployed to demand a socially just energy system, with universal access, fair prices and secure, unionised and well-paid jobs?

    Visit our collaborative website on energy democracy.

  18. Authoritarianism thumbnail image

    Authoritarianism

    17 April 2018
    Topic

    The rise in authoritarianism is often credited to the successful machinations of charismatic, skillful charlatans, ignoring the longer historical trends towards authoritarianism which has become deeply embedded in contemporary politics, economics and society. TNI has brought together researchers and activists worldwide to examine the underlying causes of today's authoritarian wave with a view to examining how progressive forces' resistance can better challenge and articulate emancipatory alternatives.

  19. This photo is from an investigative report from Rainforest Action Network that presents evidence that Cargill is operating two undisclosed palm oil plantations in West Kalimantan, Indonesia.

    Land and Water Grabbing

    01 January 2015
    Topic

    In recent years, various actors, from big foreign and domestic corporate business and finance to governments, have initiated a large-scale worldwide enclosure of agricultural lands, mostly in the Global South but also elsewhere. This is done for large-scale industrial and industrial agriculture ventures and often packaged as large-scale investment for rural development. But rather than being investment to benefit the majority of rural people, especially the poorest and most vulnerable, this process constitutes a new wave of land and water ‘grabbing’. It is a global phenomenon whereby the access, use and right to land and other closely associated natural resources is being taken over - on a large-scale and/or by large-scale capital – resulting in a cascade of negative impacts on rural livelihoods and ecologies, human rights, and local food security.

  20. Coca Leaf

    01 January 2015
    Topic

    The coca leaf has been chewed and brewed for tea for centuries in the Andean region – and does not cause any harm and is probably beneficial to human health. Yet the leaf is treated as if it is comparable to cocaine or heroin. The inclusion of the coca leaf in the list of narcotic drugs raises questions about the logic behind the current system of classification under the UN conventions. TNI believes we can find a more culturally sensitive approach to plants with psychoactive or mildly stimulant properties, and should distinguish more between problematic, recreational and traditional uses of psychoactive substances.

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