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127 items
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    Public Public Partnerships

    01 January 2015
    Topic

    TNI is advocating Public Public Partnerships (PUP) as an alternative policy to privatisation or to Public-Private Partnerships in water services as well as a concrete tool to work with partners to reform public water companies/utilities, improve services and realise the right to water on the ground. A public-public partnership (PUP) is simply collaboration between two or more public authorities or organizations, based on solidarity, to improve the capacity and effectiveness of one partner in providing public water or sanitation services. They have been described as a “peer relationship forged around common values and objectives, which exclude profit-seeking”. PUPs avoid the risks which are typically encountered in public-private partnerships: transaction costs, contract failure, renegotiation, the complexities of regulation, commercial opportunism, monopoly pricing, commercial secrecy, currency risk, and lack of public legitimacy. In general the objectives of PUPs are to improve the capacity of the assisted partner. In practice, PUPs' work can be divided into five broad categories: training and developing human resources, technical support on a wide range of issues, improving efficiency and building institutional capacity, financing water services, improving participation. Public Community Partnerships Public-communitarian partnerships (PCPs) are internationally referred to as public-public partnerships but PCPs has a stronger connotation of community. While government and public water authorities should adopt and implement a water delivery policy that prioritises serving the needs of rural communities, many state-owned utilities fail to serve hard-to-reach areas. Community-based water systems are bridging the gap in water service delivery in many parts of Asia, Africa, and Latin America. TNI has observed new forms of partnerships between public authorities and rural communities, in which the communities are engaged in the decision-making about water solutions, supported with public funding and expertise and are empowered to take responsibility for running water systems. Such partnerships can bring rapid and lasting improvements.

  2. Democratic Public Services

    01 January 2015
    Topic
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    Debating Europe Series

    01 January 2014
    Topic
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    Asia Europe Peoples' Forum

    01 January 2014
    Topic
  5. At the crossroads - Europe’s movements respond

    01 January 2014
    Topic

    Analysis by and for the European social movements acting against the EU crisis regime. European social movements inform what strategic lessons can be learned from resistance, the challenges we face and how to be prepared for upcoming struggles.

  6. Shan Market in Pyin Oo Lwin

    Myanmar Commentary

    01 January 2015
    Topic

    In addition to TNI’s regular Briefing and Report series, these Myanmar commentaries are intended to contribute to broader understanding to the many challenges facing the country and its peoples. 

    See the complete list of all the Myanmar commentaries.

    These commentaries are part of a TNI project funded by Sweden. These commentaries are part of a TNI project funded by Sweden. Opinions expressed by authors are not necessarily the views of the donor.

  7. stand on guard after burning a coca laboratory near Tumaco, Colombia, in the southwest state of Narino, June,8, 2008,

    Drugs & Conflict

    15 August 2017
    Topic
    Initially focusing on coca producing areas in the Andean Region, TNI's work on Drugs & Conflict has since expanded to cover the world’s main opium producing areas with a focus on Myanmar and Afghanistan. Over the past two decades, TNI staff has worked extensively with local organisations and researchers to advocate for more inclusive, effective and humane approaches to drug related issues in these conflict situations, while analysing the links between drug use, production, and conflict and what these mean for efforts to promote peaceful and just societies. TNI also focuses on promoting the rights of local communities involved in the cultivation of crops declared illicit, and their involvement in drug policy making, the peace process and the design and implementation of development programmes.
  8. Dismantle Corporate Power

    01 January 2015
    Topic

    The initiative to build a global campaign to dismantle corporate power and end TNCs’ impunity came from the network of organizations, movements, campaigns and affected communities that built the campaign process on European TNCs in Latin America together with the Permanent People’s Tribunal (PPT) and the Bi-regional Europe-Latin America and the Caribbean Enlazando Alternativas Network. Since late 2011, organisations from the network together with campaign organisations from different global regions have been promoting the campaign-building process. As of June 2012, over 100 organisations and movements from around the world have signed on to the campaign. For more information go to the website of Dismantle Corporate Power

  9. Drug law reform in Costa Rica

    01 January 2015
    Topic

    In contrast to other Central American countries, the possession of drugs for immediate personal use is not a criminal offence in Costa Rica. In August 2013 the cultivation, manufacture, transport and trafficking of drugs have all been made a criminal offence under the same article, which provides for a prison sentence of between 8 and 15 years without making any distinction between the offences. The government of Costa Rica supports the launch of an open international debate on the issue, but has declared itself against decriminalisation.

  10. TNI dandelion

    Fellowship

    01 January 2013
    Topic

    TNI Fellows are internationalist intellectuals with a track record of progressive activist-scholarship and a passionate commitment to social change. They bring TNI vision and new ideas, expertise relevant to current programme, connect TNI to relevant networks and commit themselves to an active role in TNI. TNI Fellowships do not involve any financial remuneration.

    Associates

     
  11. Fieldfarming in Amarapura

    Land Policy in Myanmar

    01 January 2015
    Topic

    Rural communities in Myanmar have deep social, economic and cultural ties with their land and related resources. However, the ever-growing corporate interests in extractive industries and mega infrastructure projects has led to the adoption of measures, such as land confiscations, that result in the displacement of villagers whose lives are further threatened by conflict in many regions of the country. TNI works closely in this field with local movements to promote policies that prioritise the human rights of rural communities to access land, water, forests, and fisheries.

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    Arab Spring

    01 January 2011
    Topic

    On 17 December 2010, Mohammed Bouazizi, a 26-year-old Tunisian man set himself on fire in protest at a police beating after he resisted attempts to confiscate the cart that he used to sell vegetables and fruit. His desperate action prompted a wave of protests - first in Tunisia and then across the whole of the Middle East - as public anger at pervasive corruption, police brutality, unemployment, neoliberal economic policies, rising inequality and persistent human rights abuses exploded to the fore.

    This section explores the underlying causes of the uprisings, debates the military intervention in Libya, examines the ongoing constraints on democratic movements, and looks to highlight the implications of changes in the Middle East for Western powers and their main ally, Israel who have supported autocratic dictatorships to facilitate ready access to oil, support the 'War on Terror' and act as a repressive buffer for migration into Europe.

  13. Hands On The Land

    01 January 2015
    Topic

    Hands on the Land for Food Sovereignty is a collective coalition by 16 partners, including peasants and social movements, development and environmental NGOs, human rights organisations and research activists aiming to conduct activities in Europe to raise awareness on issues related to the use and governance of land, water and other natural resources and its effects on the realization of the right to food and food sovereignty. In the context of food insecurity and climate change, the governance of natural resources requires addressing the core questions of who ought to have what rights to which resources, for what purposes and who ought to decide from a social justice-based rather than profit making-led perspective. This requires putting the visions and aspirations of those at the frontline of struggles for food sovereignty, whether they be small-scale fishing communities, peasants, pastoralists, indigenous peoples, young and prospective farmers, as well as the most vulnerable and marginalised, at the heart of policies which affect them.

    Read more on the Hands on the Land website.

  14. Ethnic Conflict in Myanmar

    01 January 2015
    Topic

    Myanmar is one of the most ethnically diverse countries in the world. While making up to 40 per cent of the population, ethnic minority groups have long been marginalised and denied basic rights due to decades of civil war and competing economic interests in areas and resources on which many nationality peoples depend for survival. TNI’s work in this field centralises around promoting the active role of ethnic-based civil society organisations in peace, reform and policy-making processes.

  15. UN Drug Control

    12 July 2017
    Topic
    The UN drug control system has been in place for more than half a century. Does it still serve its purpose or is reform of its legal and institutional architecture needed? There are many questions about outdated provisions, unintended consequences and tensions with today's UN norms in the fields of human rights, development, as well as peace and security. Find critical background and proposals for reform in this collection.
  16. Drug law reform in Ecuador

    01 January 2015
    Topic

    Like in other countries in the region, drug control measures by the government of Ecuador have been modeled after the pressure and interests of the United States. Even though the country is an important hub for the transit of illicit drugs and chemical supplies, as well as for money laundering, trafficking is not perceived as a significant threat. This is also the case because the cultivation of coca is minimal compared to other countries in the region such as Colombia, Peru and Bolivia. Paradoxically, Ecuador has one of the most severe drug legislations in Latin America.

  17. War on Drugs

    01 January 2015
    Topic

    The war on drugs is waged at its worst in the source zone of production. Major consumer countries - the US in particular - think they are able to tackle drug consumption at home by reducing the supply from the "source zones" such as the Andean region - Colombia, Bolivia and Peru - and Central and South-East Asia - Afghanistan and Burma. The primary goal of the supply reduction strategies is to decrease the amount of drugs entering the major consuming countries and subsequently, because the strategy allegedly leads to higher prices that would lead to lower demand.

  18. The Drug Law Reform - Expert Seminars

    01 January 2015
    Topic

    The Drug Law Reform project organises a series of expert seminars, drug policy briefings and informal drug policy dialogues. The activities serve to cross-fertilise policy debates between countries and regions, stimulating participants to exchange experiences and learn lessons between policy officials, representatives from international agencies and nongovernmental experts and practitioners. Seminars are held under Chatham House Rule to ensure confidentiality and to allow participants a free exchange of ideas.

  19. Drug law reform in Mexico

    01 January 2013
    Topic

    Mexico is the Latin American country that has bore the highest costs from the War on Drugs, suffering from high national rates of violence, corruption in state institutions, and an increase in the power of organised crime groups. As with other countries in the region, implementation of a prohibitionist drug law approach has had the adverse effect of increasing the number of people held in prison for minor drug offences. This page summarises the latest developments in the debate on drug law and drug policy in Mexico.

  20. Coca Leaf

    01 January 2015
    Topic

    The coca leaf has been chewed and brewed for tea for centuries in the Andean region – and does not cause any harm and is probably beneficial to human health. Yet the leaf is treated as if it is comparable to cocaine or heroin. The inclusion of the coca leaf in the list of narcotic drugs raises questions about the logic behind the current system of classification under the UN conventions. TNI believes we can find a more culturally sensitive approach to plants with psychoactive or mildly stimulant properties, and should distinguish more between problematic, recreational and traditional uses of psychoactive substances.

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