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2740 items
  1. Resistance and defence of water and territories in Brazil

    Leandro Bonecini, Satoko Kishimoto
    04 April 2018
    Article

    Nearly 7,000 people from more than 30 countries, and from almost every Brazilian state, gathered at the Alternative World Water Forum (FAMA) from 17 to 22 March 2018. The purpose of this mobilisation was to challenge the legitimacy of the World Water Forum, which is organised every three years by the private think-tank World Water Council together with its corporate partners.

  2. Turin: The long march towards water remunicipalisation

    Mariangela Rosolen
    24 January 2018
    Article

    On 9 October 2017, the Turin City Council turned back privatisation and took another step towards the remunicipalisation of its metropolitan water system. And so the city entered the next phase of its long march towards water sovereignty, begun in the aftermath of the Second World War on the ruins of a town half-destroyed by allied bombing and by Nazi/Fascist retaliations against the democratic popular resistance.

  3. The future for democratic public water: resistance and alternatives

    Satoko Kishimoto, Leandro Bonecini
    05 April 2018
    Article

    The Alternative World Water Forum - FAMA, held from March 17th to 22nd in Brasilia attracted 7,000 people from almost every state in Brazil. FAMA sent a clear message that it would not engage with the opaque 8th World Water Forum, hosted by the private think-tank World Water Council and its corporate partners. The World Water Council has fostered pro-privatisation policy debates for decades.

  4. Public Water and Covid-19

    22 March 2021
    Book

    Covid-19 has once again demonstrated the significance of safe, accessible and affordable water for all. It has also highlighted enormous disparities in service provision while at the same time dealing a blow to public water and sanitation operators around the world due to massive drops in revenues, rapidly rising costs and concerns about health and safety in the workplace. This book provides the first global overview of the response of public water operators to this crisis, shining a light on the complex challenges they face and how they have responded in different contexts. It looks specifically at ‘public’ water and asks how public ownership and public management have enabled (or not) equitable and democratic emergency services, and how these Covid-19 experiences could contribute to expanded and sustainable forms of public water services in the future.

  5. This photo is from an investigative report from Rainforest Action Network that presents evidence that Cargill is operating two undisclosed palm oil plantations in West Kalimantan, Indonesia.

    Land and Water Grabbing

    01 January 2015
    Topic

    In recent years, various actors, from big foreign and domestic corporate business and finance to governments, have initiated a large-scale worldwide enclosure of agricultural lands, mostly in the Global South but also elsewhere. This is done for large-scale industrial and industrial agriculture ventures and often packaged as large-scale investment for rural development. But rather than being investment to benefit the majority of rural people, especially the poorest and most vulnerable, this process constitutes a new wave of land and water ‘grabbing’. It is a global phenomenon whereby the access, use and right to land and other closely associated natural resources is being taken over - on a large-scale and/or by large-scale capital – resulting in a cascade of negative impacts on rural livelihoods and ecologies, human rights, and local food security.

  6. A New Wave of Water Privatisation in Indonesia

    Irfan Zamzami
    22 December 2017
    Article

    The central government of Indonesia has repeatedly announced its intention to universalise access to clean water by 2019.  To achieve this, an estimated 27 million new connections are needed, with a major investment gap of IDR 274.8 trillion (US$20.8 billion). 

  7. Are African land grabs really water grabs?

    Jennifer Franco, Lyla Mehta, Gert Jan Veldwisch
    22 March 2013
    Article

    As land is grabbed and earmarked in Africa for supposed development, there are nearly always implications for the water nearby, for local people's land and water rights and environmental sustainability.

  8. Flowing movement

    Gerardo Alatorre Frenk
    05 January 2018
    Article

    The social, political and environmental conflicts regarding the management of water in today’s world are a clear indication of the tensions at this point in history, when capitalist greed for what it sees as ‘energy, water and mineral resources’ knows no bounds. Nevertheless, governments can and are being obliged to open up political space for other ways of approaching and organizing the management of watersheds and water. Here we will look at the case of Agua para Tod@s Agua para la Vida (Water for All, Water for Life), an example of how people are developing a future different to what the hegemonic system tells us is the only one possible.

  9. Save Our Sperrins: Water, more precious than gold

    Niamh Ni Bhriain
    27 August 2019
    Article

    The hills of the Sperrins in County Tyrone are criss-crossed with natural springs that flow off the western slopes towards the River Foyle, while to the east they meander down to Lough Neagh. This endless trickle of water recalls the natural order – water belongs here. But the people of this remote area are struggling to protect it from an impending and devastating gold rush.

  10. Photo credit: Valentina Micheli - https://www.flickr.com/photos/valemic/

    Tourism and Land Grabbing in Bali

    • Ruben Rosenberg Colorni
    09 February 2018
    Report

    The island of Bali is home to a rich and unique system of agriculture, based around traditional water management systems developed over the last 1200 years. However, growing pressure from the expansion of the tourist trade as well as the effects of climate change are putting these systems at risk. Farmers are fighting to preserve their livelihoods and maintain a base for local food sovereignty in Bali, but significant changes to policy and practice are needed to protect their rights to land, water, and seed.

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    World Water Forum 3

    17 November 2005
    Article
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    Water Justice links

    25 January 2007
    Article
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    Reclaiming Public Water

    01 August 2006
    Article
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    Water Justice activities

    aleksej
    08 February 2007
    Article

    Water Justice activities

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    Murky water

    01 March 2007
    Article

    The EU is the largest water donor in the world, providing € 1.4 billion of development aid per year. This Corporate Europe Observatory report looks at how the EU uses this funding to promote private sector water management.

     
  17. Water Commons, Water Citizenship and Water Security

    Buenaventura Dargantes, Mary Ann B. Manahan, Daniel Moss, V. Suresh
    17 July 2012
    Article

    This project was undertaken with support from the Visayas State University, Focus on the Global South, Our Water Commons, the Centre for Law and Democracy, France Liberte, and Reclaiming Public Water Network.

    The motivation behind this collection of case studies is to examine successful and/or illuminating cases of water commons governance and management, culling out insights that may be useful in communities around the world.

    downloaded at: http://www.ourwatercommons.org/water-commons-citizenship-security.

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