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  1. Cannabis in Latin America

    13 February 2020
    Press release

    This research by the Research Consortium on Drugs and the Law (Colectivo de Estudios Drogas y Derecho, CEDD) analyzes a duality facing Latin America: the prohibitionist discourse and its effects on human rights persist, alongside reforms to laws and policies related to the use of cannabis.

  2. The Uruguayan Left at the Crossroads

    Daniel Chavez
    14 November 2019
    Article

    The Frente Amplio (Broad Front) government of Uruguay, one of the most stable, fruitful and serene experiences of the “new Latin American left”, is going through a very dramatic electoral process with likely profound impacts in the country and in the region. Daniel Chavez appraises the results of the Uruguayan experience and suggests what might be relevant for other counter-hegemonic processes in the region and the world.

  3. Venezuela: democratic solutions to the crisis

    06 June 2019

    Venezuela is passing through a period of acute political, economic and social chaos. Once one of the driving powers behind the new Latin American left, the economy has collapsed and there is a shortage of food and medicine.

    What structural or historical factors have caused the current situation? Is there a peaceful and democratic way out of the crisis?

  4. Juggling crises

    Cecilia Olivet, Bettina Müller
    25 August 2020
    Article

    Peru, Mexico, Argentina, Bolivia and Guatemala are just some of the Latin American countries being hit by the investment protection regime in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic. Foreign investors are threatening to bring claims before international arbitration tribunals due to the measures states are taking to mitigate the effects of the pandemic. Arbitrators are refusing to accept states’ requests to postpone ongoing arbitration cases and are obliging governments to disburse millions to investors at a time when public funds are required for more urgent priorities. Once again, the current crisis reveals the perverse consequences of the investor-state dispute settlement system and the urgent need to break free from it.

  5. A bold foreign policy platform for the new wave of left lawmakers

    Phyllis Bennis
    15 August 2018
    Article

    Socialists and other progressives are running for U.S. office on strong domestic programs. Here’s how their foreign policy platform can be just as strong.

  6. Hojas de coca

    Migrants and Traditional Use

    Pien Metaal, Constanza Sánchez, Natalia Rebollo
    25 April 2019
    Article

    How to reconcile migrant communities’ right to the enjoyment of cultural life (including the use of traditional plants) with international drug control obligations.

  7. The commons, the state and the public: A Latin American perspective

    Daniel Chavez
    01 August 2018
    Article

    What are the commons and what is their political, social and economic relevance?

  8. Lula, Ricardo Stuckert (CLACSO)

    Lula for beginners

    Pablo Gentili
    09 April 2018
    Article

    The forces that shaped modern Brazil made the rise of a figure such as Lula da Silva all but inevitable. Conditions in Brazil today mean his imprisonment is certainly not the end of this chapter in the nation's story. Pablo Gentili, Executive Secretary of the Latin American Council of Social Sciences (CLACSO), analyses the  parallel between Brazil's history and the story of its most charismatic leader.

  9. Impacts of investment arbitration against Latin America and the Caribbean

    • Cecilia Olivet, Bettina Müller, Luciana Ghiotto
    11 December 2017
    Report

    How fair is the investment arbitration system in Latin American and Caribbean (LAC) countries? Are investor-state disputes balanced between national and corporate interests? LAC countries are among the most affected by the investment arbitration system, representing 28.6% of all known investor-state disputes around the world. In particular, Argentina, Venezuela, Mexico, Ecuador, Bolivia and Peru account for 77.3% of the total number of claims against LAC countries. Analysis shows that the system so far heavily favours corporate interests. Investors have won in 70% of the cases brought against LAC countries. As a result, LAC States have already had to pay foreign companies 20.6 billion USD, which could cover Bolivia’s budget for health and education for four whole years.

  10. Bolivia: The Left in Power

    • Linda Farthing
    02 October 2018
    Paper

    Social movements need to grapple with not only building successful political parties and winning power but also with using that power strategically to best implement change. This report examines the critical role played by Movimiento al Socialismo (MAS) government employees and the challenges they faced in advancing a social and economic justice agenda within Bolivia. How can progressive government employees remain true to their political ideology while ensuring the execution of a professional and fair public bureaucracy?

  11. People in defence of life and territory

    Raúl Zibechi
    03 January 2018
    Article

    In much of Latin America, the state does not protect its citizens. This is particularly true for the popular sectors, indigenous peoples, people of colour and mestizos, who are exposed to the onslaught of drugs trafficking, criminal gangs, the private security guards of multinational corporations (MNCs) and, paradoxically, from state security forces, such as the police and the army.

  12. GoiEner cooperative, Basque County

    A renewable energy model based on participation, collective ownership and gender equity

    17 December 2018
    Article

    The GoiEner Cooperative was founded in 2012 in the Basque Country as a response to both the energy oligopoly and the rise of the anti-austerity movement connected to the economic crisis. Over the past six years, this cooperative for renewable energy generation and consumption has grown to include nearly 9,000 members, and has become an inspiring model for the transition to a new energy model.

    Key attributes of GoiEner's approach include the alleviation of energy poverty, democratic and participatory involvement, and equal representation of men and women. GoiEner also supports the creation of new renewables cooperatives in other regions of Spain in order to increase local, democratic and renewable energy resilience.

    GoiEner cooperative, Basque County
    GoiEner cooperative, Basque County

  13. The New Decisions of the Constitutional Court: The End of Cannabis Tolerance in Spain

    Martín Barriuso Alonso
    29 January 2018
    Article

    After decades of relative tolerance towards Cannabis in Spain, the Constitutional Court decides that cannabis clubs are criminal. Years of government criminalizing strategy pay off. The national parliamentary debate can no longer be postponed.

  14. New President, the extreme right and popular resistance in Colombia

    Danilo Urrea, Lyda Fernanda Forero
    20 August 2018
    Article

    The outcome of the Colombian presidential elections will have dire political consequences, visible even before the new president took office last August 7.

  15. Democracy Not for Sale

    • Stephan Backes , Jenny Gkiougki, Sylvia Kay, Charalampos Konstantinidis, Emily Mattheisen, Christina Sakali, Eirini Tzekou, Leonidas Vatikiotis, Pietje Vervest
    19 November 2018
    Report

    Austerity measures led to increased rural poverty and food insecurity in Greece and violated her people's human right to food. How did this happen and who is responsible?

  16. A New Wave of Water Privatisation in Indonesia

    Irfan Zamzami
    22 December 2017
    Article

    The central government of Indonesia has repeatedly announced its intention to universalise access to clean water by 2019.  To achieve this, an estimated 27 million new connections are needed, with a major investment gap of IDR 274.8 trillion (US$20.8 billion). 

  17. Multistakeholderism: a critical look

    10 September 2019
    Report

    Multistakeholder approaches are becoming ever more dominant, shaping standards for products, setting the rules for global initiatives and increasingly entering every arena of global governance including the UN. What is the driving force behind these initiatives? To whom are they accountable? What are the implications for social movements seeking to challenge unjust power relations within states and globally?

  18. Multi-stakeholderism: A corporate push thumbnail image

    Multi-stakeholderism: a corporate push for a new form of global governance

    • Harris Gleckman
    19 January 2016
    Report

    The World Economic Forum’s Global Redesign Initiative is perhaps the best reflection of how corporations and other elites envision the future of governance. It calls for marginalising intergovernmental decision-making with a system of multi-stakeholder governance, but what does this mean for democracy, accountability and the rule of law?

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