Search results

13818 items
  1. 4 common myths about the smokable cocaine market

    17 April 2020
    Article

    From 2014 to 2018, our research partners in Latin American and Caribbean cities gathered information from people who use or sell smokable cocaine, in order to identify key patterns in the regional markets of smokable cocaine. The information and testimonials we gathered reveal a lack of policy responses beyond punitive measures. Meanwhile, myths and misunderstandings about smokable cocaine and its users prevail. Read on below as we attempt to debunk the four most common myths.

  2. Smokable cocaine markets in Latin America and the Caribbean

    • Ernesto Cortés Amador, Pien Metaal
    02 March 2020
    Report

    Smokable cocaines are commonly referred to as “the most harmful drug”, and considered not just a threat to public health, but also to public security in the urban centres of many large cities. As a result, its users are frequently subject to hostility and stigmatization.

  3. Launch of Study on Smokable Cocaine in Latin America and the Caribbean

    05 March 2020

    Societies in the Americas have coexisted with smokable cocaines for over four decades, but - surprisingly - there is a dearth of research on the development of the market, or much first-hand evidence of how this substance is actually commercialized and used by millions of people in the region. After a few years of field research, our study on the topic will be launched at the Commission on Narcotic Drugs.

  4. Sentinels of Privilege and the Ressentiment of the Powerful

    • Kurt Shaw, Rita de Cácia Oenning da Silva
    27 April 2018
    Paper

    Through the experience of working with kids from Brazil’s favelas (shanty-towns) telling their stories, two film-makers explore how the rise of the authoritarian right in Brazil is based on a deep fear by elites of social mobility and a desire to preserve their traditional privileges through both physical as well as political walls.

  5. Taking on the Tech Titans: Reclaiming our data commons - webinar recording

    11 June 2020
    Multi-media

    Big Tech has emerged as one of the bigger winners of the global pandemic. A global panel of activists and researchers gathered to analyse the nature and source of Big Tech's power and how communities, movements and cities might reclaim ownership and control of our data.

  6. IT for Change logo

    IT for Change

    Profile

    IT for Change logo

  7. Populism from above and below: agriculture and the political ambiguities of the Workers’ Party in Brazil

    • Daniela Andrade
    03 July 2018
    Paper

    Brazil has recently undergone a shift from economic growth to recession, as well as from a left-wing, neo-developmentalist politics to one on the far-right, authoritarian and economically ultraliberal. Such an economic and political U-turn touched upon the countryside in contrasting ways. This paper reflects on the politics of the past. It suggests that the road to regression was paved during the tenure of the Worker’s Party (PT), when politics were considered both popular and progressive. And it was under the PT’s rule when the ‘rural world’ mattered the most for politics.

  8. The data of money

    • Andrés Arauz
    28 January 2019
    Paper

    The international bank transfer system, SWIFT, is a form of contemporary digital colonialism and surveillance capitalism as it is run by US firms and provides data to US government agencies. Drives by governments and philanthropists to increase use of digital money will only strengthen it further.

  9. Coca leaf: Myths and Reality

    • Tom Blickman
    05 August 2014
    Primer

    Many myths surround coca. Every day press accounts around the world use the word coca in their headlines, when in fact they refer to cocaine. TNI's Drugs and Democracy Team exposes the myths and reality surrounding the coca leaf.

  10. The Brazil that remains or what remains of Brazil

    Pablo Gentili
    31 October 2018
    Article

    For the first time Brazil has elected a president without the support of the poorest or the destitute. Though 55 percent of the electorate opted to steer the country into the abyss, people with lower incomes did not vote for Bolsonaro. In the new Brazilian Congress the military and police caucus overshadows all others.

  11. Taking on the Tech Titans: Reclaiming our data commons

    10 June 2020

    Big Tech has emerged as one of the bigger winners of the global pandemic. A global panel of activists and researchers will analyse the nature and source of Big Tech's power and how communities, movements and cities might reclaim ownership and control of our data.

  12. Coca Leaf

    01 January 2015
    Topic

    The coca leaf has been chewed and brewed for tea for centuries in the Andean region – and does not cause any harm and is probably beneficial to human health. Yet the leaf is treated as if it is comparable to cocaine or heroin. The inclusion of the coca leaf in the list of narcotic drugs raises questions about the logic behind the current system of classification under the UN conventions. TNI believes we can find a more culturally sensitive approach to plants with psychoactive or mildly stimulant properties, and should distinguish more between problematic, recreational and traditional uses of psychoactive substances.

  13. State of Power 2019 cover thumbnail

    Cocaine on Wall Street, The War on Drugs, and Peace in Colombia

    • Jorge Andrés Forero-González , Miranda D. Mosis, Diana María Peña-García
    08 February 2019
    Paper

    This essay connects cocaine, the financial system and global economies through the experience of the war on drugs and peace process in Colombia.

  14. New Politics Online Conference 2021

    New Politics Online Conference 2021

    11 January 2021

    Democratic Socialism in Global Perspective

  15. Fighting Vale and corporate capture in Brazil

    04 February 2020
    Article

    Brazilian community lawyer Tchenna Maso talks about the challenges in taking on multinational corporations — and some of the victories along the way.

  16. Brazil: The need for a Binding Treaty to hold multinationals accountable for their crimes

    20 March 2019

    An eyewitness report from Vale corporate crimes in Brazil.

  17. Thumbnail

    MultiLatin Agribusiness: the Expansion of Argentinian Firms in Brazil

    • Clara Craviotti
    18 May 2015
    Paper

    From 2000, onwards a growing trend of internationalization of Argentinian firms has emerged, with neighbouring countries as a main focus, particularly Brazil. Agricultural production (particularly "flex crops", such as soybean, linked to the new food-fodder-fuel complex) has constituted a central point of their business.

  18. Chinese and Other Foreign Investments in the Brazilian Soybean Complex

    • Gustavo de L. T. Oliveira
    18 May 2015
    Paper

    As Brazil and China become the world’s leading exporter and importer of soybeans respectively, Chinese companies have sought investments in Brazil to wrest greater control over the flows and profits of the international soybean trade from North Atlantic-based transnational companies. While some promote these as positive “South-South cooperation”, many others condemn them as neocolonial “land grabs” that displace peasants, cause environmental degradation, and deindustrialize the Brazilian economy.

  19. Authoritarian elitism and popular movements in Brazil

    Wendy Wolford, Sérgio Sauer
    07 March 2018
    Article

    Can a president institute radical popular change alongside structural inequality and a militarized elite? The Brazilian case suggests that a progressive political party requires more social movement mobilization, not less.

  20. Statement from the 6th Myanmar Opium Farmers' Forum

    01 June 2018
    Declaration

    Between 26 and 28 May 2018, representatives of opium farming communities in several states in Myanmar came together in Lashio, Shan State, to share experiences, concerns, and initiatives on the issue of illicit cultivation, especially in relation with supply-side policies which have affected their lives and livelihoods. A final statement was concluded at the end of the forum.

Pages