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  1. From War to Peace in Kayah (Karenni) State

    • Tom Kramer, Oliver Russell, Martin Smith
    29 June 2018
    Report
    Kayah State, historically known as “Karenni State”, is an example of the reform dilemmas that the ethnic nationality peoples in Myanmar face today. Although the country’s smallest state, it reflects many of the challenges in peace-building and socio-political transition that need resolution in Myanmar at large: political impasse, a multiplicity of conflict actors, contested natural resources, land grabbing, humanitarian suffering, and divided communities seeking to rebuild after more than six decades of civil war.
     
  2. The China-Myanmar border at Muse-Ruili/ TNI

    China’s Engagement in Myanmar: From Malacca Dilemma to Transition Dilemma

    18 July 2016
    Policy briefing

    Myanmar’s political transition, which began in 2011, has brought China’s relationship with the country into question. China has made important steps to recognise this, but fundamental difficulties remain, including ongoing ethnic conflict and conflicting visions of development. Given their proximity and troubled histories, it is essential that good relations are developed between the two countries on the basis of equality and mutual respect. This briefing outlines the key histories, developments and strategies in recent Myanmar-China relations.

  3. Panglong monument with Shwedagon replica in background

    Beyond Panglong: Myanmar’s National Peace and Reform Dilemma

    19 September 2017
    Policy briefing

    How is the peace process in Myanmar going? What progress has been made toward reform? After decades under military rule, the 21st Century Panglong Conference has been welcomed as the most encouraging recent initiative to address humanitarian suffering and national instability. It prioritises ethnic peace and political reform at a moment of opportunity for national reconciliation. However, as ethnic conflict and refugee displacement continue worrying failings have started to appear, raising many warnings from the country’s troubled history.

  4. Colombia: elections, war and peace

    Danilo Urrea, Lyda Fernanda Forero
    16 June 2018
    Article

    On 17 June, the second round of presidential elections for the 2018-2022 period will be held in Colombia. After the first round, the candidates still in the race are Gustavo Petro, representing Colombia Humana, a coalition of democratic and progressive forces, and Iván Duque for the Centro Democrático, an extreme right-wing party led by former president Álvaro Uribe Vélez.

  5. Arakan National Conference, Kyaukpyu, 2014

    Arakan (Rakhine State): A Land in Conflict on Myanmar’s Western Frontier

    • Martin Smith
    18 December 2019
    Report

    Rakhine State, historically known as Arakan, represents the post-colonial failures of Myanmar in microcosm: ethnic conflict, political impasse, militarisation, economic neglect and the marginalisation of local peoples. During the past decade, many of these challenges have gathered a new intensity, accentuating a Buddhist-Muslim divide and resulting in one of the greatest refugee crises in the modern world. A land of undoubted human and natural resource potential, Rakhine State has become one of the poorest territories in the country today.

  6. A Region in Revolt

    15 October 2020
    Book

    In 2019, a wave of mass protest movements has spread across North Africa and West Asia, including Sudan, Algeria, Iraq, Lebanon and Iran. The mass protests have much in common, from opposing authoritarian regimes and worsening economic situations to demanding radical changes in social relations. Despite their similarities, each protest movement operates under different conditions that cannot be ignored. The specific historic, political and economic contexts of each country have determined who the key actors of the uprisings are and their location across old and new divides. This book elaborates on these similarities and differences to paint a clearer picture of these movements and draw out important lessons to inform future struggles.

  7. Ómar with his coffee plants

    Coca and the Colombian Peace Accords

    Martin Jelsma, Coletta Youngers
    11 August 2017
    Article

    Getting to the Briceño region in the heart of Antioquia requires an excellent vehicle, and a lot of time and luck. The week before our journey there in mid-July, heavy rains wiped out part of the road between Briceño and Pueblo Nuevo, stranding folks on one side or the other. We were lucky on the day of our journey – no rain. But it took a six-hour drive to get from Medellín to Briceño, and another three hours of sometimes harrowing curves to Pueblo Nuevo. The dirt-road drive itself was a stark reminder of the challenges Colombia faces as it seeks to eliminate 50,000 hectares of coca this year through the crop substitution program, Programa Nacional Integral de Sustitución de Cultivos de Uso Ilícito (National Comprehensive Program for the Substitution of Illicit Crops), known by the acronym PNIS.

  8. Abolish national security

    • Arun Kundnani
    17 June 2021
    Paper

    In this publication Arun Kundnani argues that a politics of abolitionism offers the best approach to overcoming the failures of US national security policy. More than calls to abolish individual national security agencies, abolitionism offers a conceptual framework within which the concept of security can be rethought and actions taken towards a deep transformation of policy-making.

  9. Trump's Middle East 'Peace Plan' Is a Step Towards Institutionalising Apartheid

    Achin Vanaik
    10 February 2020
    Article

    The Trump Peace Plan unveiled on January 28, represents the formal institutionalisation of an Israeli apartheid state. Most other governments – regardless of whether they enthusiastically or more cautiously welcomed the Plan or even criticised or rejected it – have invariably stated that, given the absence of the Palestinian side in the process of forming this Plan, a negotiated ‘final settlement’ is still needed.

  10. Militarism and the police

    Andrew Metheven
    16 May 2021
    Article

    Militarism is the glue that underpins violence being meted out to people around the world at the hands of the police and security forces. It will continue to sustain the violent, abusive, racist, oppressive policing that looks to uphold an oppressive and destructive status quo. It affects every one of us, so it is everyone’s concern.

  11. What kind of security policy better serves democracy?

    Ben Hayes, Cori Crider, Narzanin Massoumi, Daniel Holder
    15 July 2019
    Article

    What type of security policy at home and abroad do we need to make our democracies fit for purpose? A key panel discussion for our times.

  12. It remains our obligation to respond

    Phyllis Bennis
    18 May 2018
    In the media

    Over the last six weeks the Israeli-Palestinian conflict reached its lowest point since the 2014 Gaza war. The Palestinian protests on the Gaza border that started on March 30 under the name 'Great March of Return', turned into massacre on May 14.

  13. The Secure and the Dispossessed

    23 October 2015
    Book

    This agenda-setting book examines the military and corporations' strategies in the context of climate change to secure wealth for those who have it while further dispossessing those who will be most affected by climate change.

  14. Why failing to include investment issues at WTO should be celebrated

    13 December 2017
    Press release

    A push by 39 WTO members, including China, Russia, the EU, Argentina, Brazil and Mexico to reintroduce formal discussions on investment facilitation at the 11th World Trade Organization (WTO) Ministerial conference has failed.

  15. Military planning for climate breakdown

    04 May 2021
    Multi-media

    The military is taking the climate crisis seriously, but whose interests do their climate plans serve?

  16. State of Power 2021

    16 May 2021
    Report

    TNI's tenth State of Power report explores the history, structures and changing dynamics of the military, policing and homeland security in the world today and outlines emancipatory visions and ideas to end the violence of the state.

  17. States of Control: the dark side of pandemic politics: Webinar recording

    29 April 2020
    Multi-media

    A recording of our webinar on authoritarian and repressive state responses to the Coronavirus pandemic, featuring a UN Special Rapporteur on Protecting Human Rights and other global experts and activists.

  18. Left behind by Northern Ireland’s neoliberal peace

    Niamh Ni Bhriain
    06 May 2019
    Article

    Recent events have exposed how Northern Ireland hasn’t experienced peace as much as a cold war. The structural violence, legacy of conflict and democratic deficit can’t be left to dangerously smoulder any longer.

  19. Displaced civilians and migrant workers in Tanai conflict zone, Kachin State, 29 January

    Multiculturalism and Social Justice in the Modern Nation-State

    Lahpai Seng Raw
    05 February 2018
    Article

    An ethnocratic state produces a form of fascism in which the state supports the rights and welfare of the dominant ethnic group, but not others. By contrast, a tolerant multicultural state or plural society permits all people, regardless of ethnicity, to be recognised as equal members and thus achieves social justice. This comparison suggests that narrow nationalism is a chief source of the failure of Myanmar to become a modern and successful nation-state.

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