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12148 items
  1. Criminalisation of environmental harm

    Katerina Gladkova
    23 April 2018
    Article

    The joint report produced by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) and INTERPOL in 2016 paints a rather grim picture of the extent of environmental crime worldwide. It identifies it as the fourth largest criminal enterprise globally, right behind drug smuggling, counterfeiting, and human trafficking. Two questions are worth pondering here: to quote George Monbiot, how did we get into this mess and what can we do about it?

  2. Lula, Ricardo Stuckert (CLACSO)

    Lula for beginners

    Pablo Gentili
    09 April 2018
    Article

    The forces that shaped modern Brazil made the rise of a figure such as Lula da Silva all but inevitable. Conditions in Brazil today mean his imprisonment is certainly not the end of this chapter in the nation's story. Pablo Gentili, Executive Secretary of the Latin American Council of Social Sciences (CLACSO), analyses the  parallel between Brazil's history and the story of its most charismatic leader.

  3. Brazil: The need for a Binding Treaty to hold multinationals accountable for their crimes

    20 March 2019 - Event

    An eyewitness report from Vale corporate crimes in Brazil.

  4. Letelier Dossier - Photos

    12 September 2007
    Article
  5. Dossier Orlando Letelier

    15 December 2009
    Article

    TNI dossier on Orlando Letelier, second director of TNI.

  6. Environmentalism and authoritarian politics in Vietnam

    • Thieu-Dang Nguyen, Simone Datzberger
    07 May 2018
    Paper

    Popular protests that erupted in Vietnam in 2016 after a toxic spill by a Taiwanese steel factory have shown that environmental-focused campaigns can engage and mobilise the public to resist authoritarian practices, create a cohesive public voice and help build collective power.

  7. Thumbnail

    Dossier on EU-Colombia Free Trade Agreement

    • Laura Rangel
    12 September 2012
    Report

    The EU-Colombia Free Trade Agreement implies violations in human rights, and trade unionists in particular. Read about the possible implications in three sectors; mining, palmoil and dairy.

  8. Examining Barcelona en Comu's attempt to be a movement-party

    06 March 2018
    Paper

    The radical citizens' movement and party, Barcelona en Comú, has a goal of democratizing the relationship between civil society and city institutions by transforming the traditional structures of political parties and creating new formsof democratic political participation. Through the study of one of the city's many neighbourhood assemblies, Zelinka examines whether it is possible for a political organization to be movement and institution at the same time and what kind of challenges, conflicts and opportunities emerge through this undertaking.

  9. Extractivism and resistance in North Africa

    • Hamza Hamouchene
    20 November 2019
    Paper

    Northern African countries are key suppliers of natural resources to the global economy, from large- scale oil and gas extraction in Algeria and Tunisia, to phosphate mining in Tunisia and Morocco, to water-intensive agribusiness paired with tourism in Morocco and Tunisia. The commodification of nature and privatisation of resources entailed in these projects has led to serious environmental damages, and forced these countries into a subservient position in the global economy, sustaining and deepening global inequalities.

  10. The invisible war for those who defend their own land

    05 October 2018 - Event

    TNI's War and Pacification Programme - Conference on pacification theory, the "shrinking space" for environmental activists and movements, the policing of extractives and examples of resistance.

  11. Spanish municipal elections

    Sol Trumbo Vila
    05 June 2019
    Article

    With the results still playing out, the survival of parties like Barcelona en Comú will depend on their ability to bring together the ‘three souls’ of the movement.

  12. CETA: Feiten en fabels

    • Bas van Beek, Sophia Beunder, Roeline Knottnerus, Jilles Mast, Roos van Os, Bart-Jaap Verbeek, Hilde van der Pas
    21 June 2018
    Report

    Zijn handelsverdragen als CETA werkelijk goed voor de economie en de werkgelegenheid?

  13. Search

    16 October 2014

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  14. Controlling People Through Language

    Boris Kagarlitsky
    16 September 2010
    Article

    Market reforms have given rise to new revisions of the language, and all personal activities are now expressed in terms of buying and selling.

  15. The Challenges of Medicinal Cannabis in Colombia

    • Nicolás Martínez Rivera
    29 October 2019
    Policy briefing

    In July 2016, the Colombian government enacted Law 1787, which regulates the use of medicinal cannabis and its trade in the country. With this decision and a series of subsequent resolutions, Colombia joined the more than a dozen countries that have put into practice different types of regulation to explore the advantages of this plant as an alternative pharmaceutical.

  16. Flower seed

    Amanda Fielding

    Profile
  17. Thumbnail

    Costs of C.O.P. failure tagged

    Imelda V. Abaño
    17 December 2009
    In the media

    The United Nations-backed climate-change negotiations are now in deadlock, with many key issues still unresolved, mainly on emissions cuts  and financing the developing world’s coping mechanisms.

  18. In Search of Rights

    • The Research Consortium on Drugs and the Law (CEDD)
    09 July 2014

    The Research Consortium on Drugs and the Law (Colectivo de Estudios Drogas y Derecho, CEDD) has published a new study that assesses state responses to illicitly-used drugs in eight countries in Latin America: Argentina, Brazil, Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, Mexico, Peru and Uruguay. The study found that Latin American governments’ approach to drug use continues to be predominantly through the criminal justice system, not health institutions. Even in countries where consumption is not a crime, persistent criminalization of drug users is common.

     

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    ASUM donates to purchase green tags

    Amy Faxon
    05 February 2008
    In the media

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