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  1. The Future is Public

    03 December 2019
    Report

    The Future is Public report is about more than just numbers. A growing international movement is building democratic public services for the social, ecological and economic challenges of our time.

  2. The Future Is Public: Special Report from Amsterdam

    Laura Flanders
    13 February 2020
    Multi-media

    From Austria to Chile, Lagos to London, people are demanding policies that democratize economies and keep public resources in public hands. In just the last decade, more than 2,400 cities in 58 countries have brought privatized resources back under public control. Laura Flanders reports from Amsterdam at The Future is Public, a conference co-hosted by TNI that brings together hundreds of organizers, scholars, and government officials who are working to democratize their municipal and national economies.

  3. The Future is Public

    12 May 2020
    Book

    Resistance to privatisation has turned into a powerful force for change. (Re)municipalisation refers to the reclaiming of public ownership of services as well as the creation of new public services. In recent years, our research has identified more than 1,400 successful (re)municipalisation cases involving more than 2,400 cities in 58 countries around the world. 

  4. Image by <a href="https://pixabay.com/users/congerdesign-509903/?utm_source=link-attribution&amp;utm_medium=referral&amp;utm_campaign=image&amp;utm_content=3488861">congerdesign</a> from <a href="https://pixabay.com/?utm_source=link-attribution&amp;utm_me

    How we made the news in 2020

    22 December 2020
    Article

    TNI’s work is in the news almost every working day of the year. Together with our partners, we enjoy wide coverage in national and international news outlets from around the world. Here are some of the highlights from 2020 of which we are particularly proud.

  5. 7 steps to build a democratic economy

    • James Angel
    20 February 2020

    Towns and cities stand at the heart of the new public future. Between 2000 and 2019, there were over 1400 new cases of “municipalisation” or “remunicipalisation”, the creation of new public enterprises run by local governments or the return of privatised enterprises to municipal hands. This trend occurred across 2400 locales in 58 countries. 

  6. Enough is enough

    19 October 2020

    Privatisation and public services: A conversation with current and former UN Special Rapporteurs. Join us for an online discussion on 19th October 2020 bringing together for the first time current and former UN Special Rapporteurs to reflect on the impacts of privatisation and on renewed momentum and strategies for the public provision of services related to economic, social and cultural rights such as health, education, water sanitation and housing.

  7. Public is Back - Proposals for a democratic just economy, 4pm CET 20 May

    Public is Back: Proposals for a democratic just economy - webinar recording

    20 May 2020
    Multi-media

    Webinar recording with outgoing UN rapporteur, Philip Alston in conversation with trade unionists and activists in Italy, Nigeria and India sharing analysis on the impacts of privatisation in a time of COVID-19 and the strategies for resistance and also constructing participatory public alternatives.

  8. "The UN is being turned into a public-private partnership"

    Harris Gleckman, Lynn Fries
    21 November 2019
    Multi-media

    Multistakeholderism has become a new buzzword for global governance, shaping standards for products, setting the rules for global initiatives and increasingly entering every arena of global governance including the UN. They are driven by transnational corporations to consolidate power and profits and have disturbing implications for democracy, accountability and for communities most affected by corporate human rights violations.

  9. Public is Back - Proposals for a democratic just economy, 4pm CET 20 May

    Public is Back: Proposals for a democratic just economy

    20 May 2020

    Support for public services and limits on private profit is at an all-time high in the wake of the pandemic. How do we ensure this prioritisation of public needs and goods becomes permanent? What are the best models of democratic and participatory public services? Join a webinar with trade unionists and activists in Italy, Nigeria and India advancing bold new visions for a public future. 

  10. “The drug market is thriving” while the Commission on Narcotic Drugs limps along

    Ann Fordham
    11 April 2018
    Article

    The admission by UN's lead agency for drugs, the UNODC,  that “the drug market is thriving” in its 2017 World Drug Report is an important one given that it is months away from 2019 – the target date by which governments committed to “significantly reduce or eliminate” the global drug market. At the recent annual gathering of the Commission on Narcotic Drugs (CND) in Vienna, this abysmal failure to claim any progress towards these  ‘drug-free’ targets was the backdrop to the latest round of tense negotiations on global drug control.

  11. The Globalisation of Countering Violent Extremism Policy

    16 October 2018

    At this New York launch event for the The Globalisation of Countering Violent Extremism Policy report, the adoption of CVE by policymakers within international institutions will be analyzed and assessed from a human rights perspective.

  12. Survey: A Global Survey on Public Sector Capabilities and Responses to the Pandemic

    22 April 2020
    Multi-media

    Take this survey and help us to map and bring out the magnitude and value of the public sector. You can submit until May 16. 

  13. Think Global Drink Local: Pub Quiz #4

    29 May 2019

    An exciting 4th edition of the Think Global Drink Local Pub Quiz.

  14. Opium Farmers in Myanmar: The Lives of Producers of Prohibited Plants

    Sai Lone
    17 December 2018
    Article

    The problem of opium should not be perceived only as a simple, black-and-white, law enforcement problem. To address problems related to opium cultivation, substantial socio-economic development is required to provide meaningful alternatives for farmers, and to ensure that a humanitarian crisis will not occur as the consequence of repressive drug control policies.

  15. Film: Opium Farmer

    Myanmar Opium Farmers Forum (MOFF)
    17 December 2018
    Multi-media

    For most farmers and their families, opium cultivation is a means of survival, especially in the context poverty, insecurity, and repression. This film sensitively portrays the lives of two opium farming families in Myanmar and sheds light on their plight.

  16. Lula, Ricardo Stuckert (CLACSO)

    Lula for beginners

    Pablo Gentili
    09 April 2018
    Article

    The forces that shaped modern Brazil made the rise of a figure such as Lula da Silva all but inevitable. Conditions in Brazil today mean his imprisonment is certainly not the end of this chapter in the nation's story. Pablo Gentili, Executive Secretary of the Latin American Council of Social Sciences (CLACSO), analyses the  parallel between Brazil's history and the story of its most charismatic leader.

  17. Rescheduling cannabis at the UN level

    15 October 2020
    Snapshot

    Here’s all you need to know about the WHO’s recommendations to reschedule cannabis and cannabis-related substances.

    (Last updated: 18 December 2020)

  18. Cannabis

    01 January 2015
    Topic

    The status of cannabis in the UN drug conventions is controversial. It is now scheduled among the most dangerous substances. How and why did cannabis get in the conventions? Does it belong there? What are the options to review the status of cannabis according to current scientific data? Is making cannabis subject to a control regime similar to harmful substances like alcohol and tobacco a solution?

  19. State of Power 2014 cover

    State of empire: How failed foreign policy, new emerging economies, and peoples’ movements are undermining US power

    • Phyllis Bennis
    06 February 2014
    Report

    When the New York Times dubbed the global anti-war protesters of February 15, 2003, “the second super-power,” it challenged the decade-plus view of undisputed U.S. global reach that followed the demise of the Soviet Union and the end of the Cold War. The surging protests that brought 12–14 million people in 665 cities around the world were not enough to stop the U.S.-British wars against Iraq, Afghanistan and beyond. But in the decade since that extraordinary mobilisation, the U.S. empire’s reach is showing the effects of rising people’s movements, increasing multi-polarity in the world of nations and governments, declining influence in all international spheres other than military, stubbornly lasting economic crisis, and an extraordinary loss of legitimacy both at home and abroad.

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