Search results

11090 items
  1. Which Direction for the Mideast?

    Phyllis Bennis
    05 July 2012
    Article

    Responding to the New York Times' article "The Third Intifada is Inevitable," Phyllis focuses on the potential power of the Boycotts, Sanctions, and Divestment (BDS) movement.

  2. Leaving the War on Terror – A Progressive Alternative to Counter-Terrorism Policy

    04 September 2019

    Britain’s counter-terrorism policies do not work. They do not work for the British people, for the various communities in the UK whose experience of counter-terrorism has been one of stigmatisation and criminalisation, and they do not work for the people of the Middle East, South Asia and Africa whose human rights have been systematically violated in the War on Terror.

    NOTICE: Registration for this event is closed.

  3. In bid to intimidate Canada on cannabis regulation, INCB is reckless and wrong

    John Walsh, Martin Jelsma
    07 May 2018
    Article

    How constructive is the UN drug treaty monitoring body's response to Canada's proposed new cannabis law legislation?

  4. Leaving the War on Terror

    • Ruth Blakeley, Ben Hayes, Nisha Kapoor, Arun Kundnani, Narzanin Massoumi, David Miller, Tom Mills, Rizwaan Sabir, Katy Sian, Waqas Tufail
    03 September 2019
    Report

    This report offers an account of the failures of current counter-terrorism policies, an analysis of the reasons why they do not work and an outline of a progressive alternative that we hope will be the basis for a future Labour government’s approach. 

  5. “A Declaration of War on Us”: The 2018 VFV Law Amendment and its Impact on Ethnic Nationalities

    Transnational Institute (TNI)
    13 December 2018
    Article

    The right to land for all peoples is essential for peace, democracy and development.

  6. The Globalisation of Countering Violent Extremism Policy

    16 October 2018

    At this New York launch event for the The Globalisation of Countering Violent Extremism Policy report, the adoption of CVE by policymakers within international institutions will be analyzed and assessed from a human rights perspective.

  7. Image by <a href="https://pixabay.com/users/congerdesign-509903/?utm_source=link-attribution&amp;utm_medium=referral&amp;utm_campaign=image&amp;utm_content=3488861">congerdesign</a> from <a href="https://pixabay.com/?utm_source=link-attribution&amp;utm_me

    How we made the news in 2020

    22 December 2020
    Article

    TNI’s work is in the news almost every working day of the year. Together with our partners, we enjoy wide coverage in national and international news outlets from around the world. Here are some of the highlights from 2020 of which we are particularly proud.

  8. A war on dissent?

    Kevin Blowe
    30 October 2018
    Article

    The Network for Police Monitoring (Netpol) campaigns against police surveillance on political dissent and the regular smearing of activists and groups as “domestic extremists”. Kevin Blowe explains how the police are closing down the space for protest in the UK.

  9. A new ‘war on drugs’ is short sighted and naive

    Tom Blickman
    18 September 2019
    Opinion

    When the Dutch government liberalised cannabis policy in 1976, they understood that the legalisation and regulation of cannabis was actually the best solution, or at least the least bad one.

  10. From War to Peace in Kayah (Karenni) State

    • Tom Kramer, Oliver Russell, Martin Smith
    29 June 2018
    Report
    Kayah State, historically known as “Karenni State”, is an example of the reform dilemmas that the ethnic nationality peoples in Myanmar face today. Although the country’s smallest state, it reflects many of the challenges in peace-building and socio-political transition that need resolution in Myanmar at large: political impasse, a multiplicity of conflict actors, contested natural resources, land grabbing, humanitarian suffering, and divided communities seeking to rebuild after more than six decades of civil war.
     
  11. Video: War on dissent

    30 October 2018
    Multi-media

    A short film by Netpol, made with support from the Transnational Institute and filmmaker Jason Parkinson, on the shrinking space for protest in the UK.

  12. Alternative development and human rights

    Martin Jelsma
    24 October 2018
    Article

    Around the world, millions of people depend on the cultivation of coca, opium poppy and cannabis for basic subsistence. The 1961 Convention introduced strict controls on the cultivation of these plants and banned centuries-old traditional medicinal, cultural and ceremonial uses. The 1988 Convention reinforced those provisions, obliging states to eradicate illicit cultivation and to impose criminal sanctions.

  13. Transnational Institute’s Drugs & Democracy Programme Team

    World Drug Day 2018

    26 June 2018
    Declaration

    Today, on the United Nations’ International Day Against Drug Abuse and Illicit Trafficking (26th June), governments around the world are commemorating their decades-long support of the global war on drugs. 

  14. Support. Don't Punish: Future of Drug Policing

    26 June 2020

    Support. Don't Punish. campaign is aiming to envision future drug policy scenarios, this time focusing on law enforcement. During this free webinar organised on the Global Day of Action, which is officially the International Day Against Drug Abuse and Illicit Trafficking, we will collectively focus on the future of drug policing and imagine effective ways for drug policy reform.

  15. Image of financial corporation  - wall street bull with businessman

    Call for essays on the Corporation for State of Power 2020

    10 June 2019
    Article

    The Transnational Institute (TNI) in the Netherlands is issuing an open call for essays, accessible papers, infographics and artistic collaborations for its forthcoming State of Power report launched in late January 2020 to coincide with the World Economic Forum in Davos. The focus for our ninth annual edition is on 'The Corporation'.

  16. Human rights and drug policy

    • Ernestien Jensema
    18 June 2018
    Primer

    An accessible but comprehensive primer on why TNI believes that human rights must be at the heart of any debate on drug control.

  17. A response to Professor John Ruggie's 'Comments on the “Zero Draft” Treaty on Business & Human Rights'

    Harris Gleckman
    11 October 2018
    Article

    Prof John Ruggie has shared his comments on the Zero Draft treaty on TNCs and human rights on this blog earlier this month. His core concerns are that the zero draft has not adequately deal with ‘scale’ and ‘liability’. This response argues that Ruggie’s arguments in opposition to the binding treaty are misdirected and they fail to recognise the historic opportunity offered by the Human Right Council to create a human rights remedy system for corporate abuse across national boundaries.

  18. Drug Law Reform

    12 July 2017
    Topic

    The TNI/CEDD (Colectivo de Estudios Drogas y Derecho / Research Consortium on Drugs and the Law ) Drug Law Reform Project promotes more effective and humane drug policies through analysis of existing drug control policies and by promoting dialogue among key stakeholders and decision-makers. The project is focused on Latin America and hopes to stimulate  reforms by pointing out good practices and lessons learned in areas such as proportionality of sentences, prison reform, and the status of the coca leaf in the international conventions.

  19. The Limits of Law

    • Grietje Baars
    29 January 2020
    Paper

    Law is fundamentally limited in its potential to challenge corporations' power and their harm, because the law has been created to facilitate capitalist accumulation and therefore the rights of the property-owning class to force others to submit to its will. It cannot, therefore, be expected to have any emancipatory potential.

  20. Chronology on the Statue Case in Loikaw, Kayah State

    28 June 2019
    Article

    In this commentary, the Union of Karenni State Youth and LAIN Technical Support Group provide a chronology of events, outlining how arrests and the government’s handling of events have compounded rather than resolved political frustrations and inter-community understandings.

Pages