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    MultiLatin Agribusiness: the Expansion of Argentinian Firms in Brazil

    • Clara Craviotti
    18 May 2015
    Paper

    From 2000, onwards a growing trend of internationalization of Argentinian firms has emerged, with neighbouring countries as a main focus, particularly Brazil. Agricultural production (particularly "flex crops", such as soybean, linked to the new food-fodder-fuel complex) has constituted a central point of their business.

  2. Image by <a href="https://pixabay.com/users/congerdesign-509903/?utm_source=link-attribution&amp;utm_medium=referral&amp;utm_campaign=image&amp;utm_content=3488861">congerdesign</a> from <a href="https://pixabay.com/?utm_source=link-attribution&amp;utm_me

    How we made the news in 2020

    22 December 2020
    Article

    TNI’s work is in the news almost every working day of the year. Together with our partners, we enjoy wide coverage in national and international news outlets from around the world. Here are some of the highlights from 2020 of which we are particularly proud.

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    A Landmark Victory for Justice: Biowatch’s Battle with the South African State and Monsanto

    • David Fig, Rachel Wynberg
    07 May 2013
    Book

    Published by  Biowatch South Africa, this is a book about access to information, the right to know, and action in the public’s interest – a must-read for anyone campaigning for environmental or social justice.

  4. Opium Farmers in Myanmar: The Lives of Producers of Prohibited Plants

    Sai Lone
    17 December 2018
    Article

    The problem of opium should not be perceived only as a simple, black-and-white, law enforcement problem. To address problems related to opium cultivation, substantial socio-economic development is required to provide meaningful alternatives for farmers, and to ensure that a humanitarian crisis will not occur as the consequence of repressive drug control policies.

  5. Film: Opium Farmer

    Myanmar Opium Farmers Forum (MOFF)
    17 December 2018
    Multi-media

    For most farmers and their families, opium cultivation is a means of survival, especially in the context poverty, insecurity, and repression. This film sensitively portrays the lives of two opium farming families in Myanmar and sheds light on their plight.

  6. The Media–Technology–Military Industrial Complex

    Justin Schlosberg
    04 January 2017
    Article

    Invisibility is the essence of the radical view of power developed in 1959 by US sociologist C. Wright Mills, according to which concentrated power in late capitalist democracies was invisible, and no longer to be found in the observable decision-making and conflicts of day-to-day partisan politics. In this essay I address fault lines in the digital information economy, which have manifested themselves in public squabbles and legal battles between content owners (especially publishers), intermediaries (such as search and social networking sites) and network operators (including Internet Service Providers (ISPs) and app platforms).

  7. Political Economy of the Rise of the Contemporary Industrial Tree Plantation Sector in Southern China

    • Yunan Xu
    19 May 2015
    Paper

    Industrial tree plantations (ITP), as a newly emerging sector, is expanding quickly and massively in Southern China, involving foreign corporations (including Finnish and Indonesian) tied to a variety of domestic partners, both state and corporate. In some places, the villagers embrace the land deals, while in others these land deals have provoked conflicts.

  8. Castle rock wildfire.

    Betting on a crash – confronting those speculating on our future

    Nick Buxton
    06 February 2019
    Article

    The dark side of capitalism is that disruption, change and scarcity all provide avenues of profit for those willing to speculate on its consequences.

  9. Leaving the War on Terror – A Progressive Alternative to Counter-Terrorism Policy

    04 September 2019

    Britain’s counter-terrorism policies do not work. They do not work for the British people, for the various communities in the UK whose experience of counter-terrorism has been one of stigmatisation and criminalisation, and they do not work for the people of the Middle East, South Asia and Africa whose human rights have been systematically violated in the War on Terror.

    NOTICE: Registration for this event is closed.

  10. Riot Police, Ukraine

    Call for essays on military, police and coercive state power

    04 September 2020
    Article

    The Transnational Institute (TNI) in the Netherlands is issuing an open call for essays, accessible papers, infographics and artistic collaborations in English or Spanish for its State of Power report to be launched in late March 2021. The focus for our tenth annual edition is on the military, police and coercive state power. (Pitch/abstract deadline: 6 October)

  11. Permanent Peoples' Tribunal: Hostile Environment on Trial

    03 November 2018

    The Permanent People’s Tribunal (PPT) is an international public tribunal and in November 2018 it is coming to London.

  12. A war on dissent?

    Kevin Blowe
    30 October 2018
    Article

    The Network for Police Monitoring (Netpol) campaigns against police surveillance on political dissent and the regular smearing of activists and groups as “domestic extremists”. Kevin Blowe explains how the police are closing down the space for protest in the UK.

  13. A response to Professor John Ruggie's 'Comments on the “Zero Draft” Treaty on Business & Human Rights'

    Harris Gleckman
    11 October 2018
    Article

    Prof John Ruggie has shared his comments on the Zero Draft treaty on TNCs and human rights on this blog earlier this month. His core concerns are that the zero draft has not adequately deal with ‘scale’ and ‘liability’. This response argues that Ruggie’s arguments in opposition to the binding treaty are misdirected and they fail to recognise the historic opportunity offered by the Human Right Council to create a human rights remedy system for corporate abuse across national boundaries.

  14. Taking Health Back from Corporations - Webinar recording

    23 April 2020
    Multi-media

    This webinar brought together experts in healthcare and activists at the forefront of struggles for equitable universal public healthcare from across the globe at a time when the COVID-19 pandemic has shown the necessity of a healthcare system driven by people rather than profit.

  15. A new ‘war on drugs’ is short sighted and naive

    Tom Blickman
    18 September 2019
    Opinion

    When the Dutch government liberalised cannabis policy in 1976, they understood that the legalisation and regulation of cannabis was actually the best solution, or at least the least bad one.

  16. Image of kids playing on a landscape made of a computer motherboard

    Digital Futures

    03 March 2021
    Topic

    How do we recover the emancipatory potential of technological change and bring it back under popular democratic control? As part of its Future Labs work, TNI is working with IT for Change to deepen our analysis and research on the impacts of rapid technological change in all of our areas of work. In 2021, TNI launched a series of essays in conjunction with ROAR magazine to stimulate debate and reflection.

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    Newsroom

    16 February 2010
    In the media

    Media coverage of the Drug Law Reform Project

  18. Growers' voices at the Commission on Narcotic Drugs

    Sai Lone, Pedro Arenas
    24 November 2019
    Declaration

    From 16 to 18 October 2019, representatives of member states, intergovernmental organisations, and civil society attended the 6th Intersessional Meeting of the Commission on Narcotic Drugs. On 17 October 2019, representatives of coca and opium growers from Colombia and Myanmar delivered statements highlighting the situation of communities involved in the illicit cultivation of coca and opium in both countries. Below are their full statements.

  19. Video: War on dissent

    30 October 2018
    Multi-media

    A short film by Netpol, made with support from the Transnational Institute and filmmaker Jason Parkinson, on the shrinking space for protest in the UK.

  20. Cashing in on the pandemic

    Pia Eberhardt
    19 May 2020
    Article

    As governments take action to fight the COVID-19 pandemic and prevent economic collapse, big law firms are watching the virus too. Yet their concern is not to save lives or the economy. Instead the lawyers urge big business to challenge emergency measures in order to defend their profits. In a parallel corporate justice system called ISDS, states could face multi-million dollar lawsuits.

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