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14295 items
  1. The 8th Asian Informal Drug Policy Dialogue

    25 July 2017
    Report
  2. Statement of the 3rd Myanmar Opium Farmers' Forum

    25 September 2015
    Declaration

    On 11 and 12 September 2015 opium farmers and representatives of opium farming communities from Kayah State, Shan State, Kachin State and Chin State, came together in Upper Myanmar to discuss the drug policies affecting their lives. Following from the discussions the farmers issued a statement with recommendations to policy makers nationally and internationally.

  3. The 9th Asian Informal Drug Policy Dialogue

    31 May 2018
    Report

    In December 2017, the Transnational Institute (TNI) and Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ), on behalf of the Federal Ministry of Economic Cooperation and Development of Germany (BMZ), in collaboration with the Thai Office of the Narcotics Control Board (ONCB) and the Mae Fah Luang Foundation under Royal Patronage (MFLF), jointly organised the 9th Asian Informal Drug Policy Dialogue (IDPD) in Chiang Rai, Thailand. 

  4. State of Power 2014 cover

    State of the land: Reconfiguration of the power of the state and capital in the global land rush

    • Jun Borras
    06 February 2014
    Report

    Who gets how much and what kinds of land, how, and for what purposes? These are the basic questions around the politics of land. The question of land politics has been resurrected in a big way recently, worldwide, and in ways significantly different from the past.

  5. This photo is from an investigative report from Rainforest Action Network that presents evidence that Cargill is operating two undisclosed palm oil plantations in West Kalimantan, Indonesia.

    Land and Water Grabbing

    01 January 2015
    Topic

    In recent years, various actors, from big foreign and domestic corporate business and finance to governments, have initiated a large-scale worldwide enclosure of agricultural lands, mostly in the Global South but also elsewhere. This is done for large-scale industrial and industrial agriculture ventures and often packaged as large-scale investment for rural development. But rather than being investment to benefit the majority of rural people, especially the poorest and most vulnerable, this process constitutes a new wave of land and water ‘grabbing’. It is a global phenomenon whereby the access, use and right to land and other closely associated natural resources is being taken over - on a large-scale and/or by large-scale capital – resulting in a cascade of negative impacts on rural livelihoods and ecologies, human rights, and local food security.

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    Perceptions and Practices of Investment

    • Vanessa Lamb, Nga Dao
    18 May 2015
    Paper

    China is one of the major investors in hydropower development in mainland Southeast Asia, yet Chinese involvement in hydropower varies across the region. Popular and expert viewpoints on China’s investment in hydropower also vary widely.

  7. Village meeting in Magyi

    Investing in Mon State?

    MACDO, Mads Barbesgaard
    04 February 2019
    Article

    How beneficial is the new policy of encouraging investment in Myanmar's Mon state?

  8. Institute for Policy Studies

    Profile

    Visit: ips-dc.org

  9. Landgrabbing: Contested meanings of land

    • Sylvia Kay
    06 September 2019

    Across the world, peasants, pastoralists, fishers, and indigenous peoples are losing their once effective control over the land, water, wetlands, pastures, fishing grounds and forests on which they depend including the right to decide how these natural resources will be used, when and by whom, at what scale and for what purposes, often for generations to come.

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    Authoritarian Resource Governance and Emerging Peasant Resistance in the Context of Sino-Vietnamese Tree Plantations

    • Miles Kenney‐Lazar
    18 May 2015
    Paper

    The rapid pace of the land rush by foreign investors in Laos has prompted significant concern by international observers, Lao civil society, and certain sections of the government, regarding the impacts upon farmers that are dispossessed of their land and communal resources.

  11. Photo credit: Valentina Micheli - https://www.flickr.com/photos/valemic/

    Tourism and Land Grabbing in Bali

    • Ruben Rosenberg Colorni
    09 February 2018
    Report

    The island of Bali is home to a rich and unique system of agriculture, based around traditional water management systems developed over the last 1200 years. However, growing pressure from the expansion of the tourist trade as well as the effects of climate change are putting these systems at risk. Farmers are fighting to preserve their livelihoods and maintain a base for local food sovereignty in Bali, but significant changes to policy and practice are needed to protect their rights to land, water, and seed.

  12. Are African land grabs really water grabs?

    Jennifer Franco, Lyla Mehta, Gert Jan Veldwisch
    22 March 2013
    Article

    As land is grabbed and earmarked in Africa for supposed development, there are nearly always implications for the water nearby, for local people's land and water rights and environmental sustainability.

  13. TNI in the news in 2019

    08 January 2020
    Article

    Our research and experts were cited regularly by news outlets across the world in 2019. 

  14. Land Grabbing and Human Rights

    • FIAN International
    22 May 2017
    Report

    Are EU countries guilty of human rights abuses related to land grabbing? How do EU countries contribute to land-grabbing outside of Europe? Our analysis identifies the key mechanisms through which human rights challenges emerge from land grabbing and points to the obligation of the EU and its Member States to implement a set of policy regulations.

  15. The twin challenge of agrarian and climate justice

    • Jun Borras, Jennifer Franco, Clara Mi Young Park, Mads Barbesgaard, Yukari Sekine, Ye Lin Myint, Thant Zin
    02 March 2018
    Paper

    Dominant approaches to climate change mitigation are putting new pressures on small farmers and village dwellers, justifying dispossession by powerful actors who cast villagers' traditional ways of life as ecologically destructive or economically inefficient. In order to address the twin challenges of agrarian justice and climate justice, it is critical to understand the way new conflicts and initiatives intersect with old conflicts and the way they are compounded by undemocratic settings, and inequality and division along fault-lines of gender, ethnicity, class, and generation.

  16. Annual report 2017

    • Shaun Matsheza
    01 November 2018
    Annual report

    At a time in history when reactionary forces are gaining ground and enabling even more corporate looting of our common wealth and our fragile planet, an institute like TNI is more critical than ever.

    In 2017, we marked 43 years of critical thinking, exposing the underlying causes of today’s authoritarian politics, and putting forward the real solutions we need.

  17. Implementation of Burma’s Vacant, Fallow and Virgin Land Management Law: At Odds with the Nationwide Ceasefire Agreement and Peace Negotiations

    Jason Gelbort
    10 December 2018
    Article

    Land rights of peoples must be protected to improve prospects for peace.

  18. Your Land, My Land, Our Land

    • Nyeleni Europe and Central Asia, Transnational Institute (TNI)
    28 May 2020
    Report

    The handbook is published by the Nyéléni Europe and Central Asia platform for Food Sovereignty to help nourish the food sovereignty movement with ideas that support local struggles for land. It also tries to connect different experiences and is an invitation to build collective intra-European support mechanisms for land struggles.

  19. “First they grabbed our land with guns; now they are using the law"

    26 August 2019
    Article

    Displaced people in Myanmar have been suffering layer upon layer of injustice over the past decades. Today the situation is as bad as ever.

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    BRICS and MICs in Bolivia’s ‘value’-chain agriculture

    • Ben McKay
    18 May 2015
    Paper

    A new phase of ‘foreignization’ and land grabbing is occurring via value-chain relations in Bolivia. Exogenous forces from some BRICS and MICs are penetrating Bolivia’s countryside and drastically changing social relations of production, reproduction, property and power.

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