Search results

20 items
  1. Green Grabbing: a new appropriation of nature?

    05 July 2012
    Article

    Across the world, ‘green grabbing’ – the appropriation of land and resources for environmental ends – is an emerging process of deep and growing significance. In recent years there has been a veritable explosion of scholarship examining the neoliberalization of environments, nature and conservation, drawing partly on older traditions of ecological/green Marxism and critical political ecology

  2. The Political Economy of Oil Palm as a Flex Crop

    • Alberto Alonso-Fradejas, Juan Liu, Tania Salerno, Yunan Xu
    19 May 2015
    Paper

    The ‘how’ and ‘why’ of oil palm flexing is heavily influenced by a synthesis of forces and relations within and around the oil palm value web. These dynamics impact the way flexing among oil palm’s different uses is influenced and/or carried out by various powerful actors within the state, the private sector, and civil society.

  3. People vs Nuclear Power in Jaitapur, Maharashtra

    Praful Bidwai
    10 February 2011
    Article

    In the Konkan, thousands of families in the environmentally rich and verdant Jaitapur area are waging a non-violent battle against the Department of Atomic Energy’s plan to construct the world’s biggest nuclear power complex in the region.

  4. From Durban to Rio+20: Challenging the corporate hijack of environmental policy

    14 January 2012
    Other news

    Tackling the corporate takeover of environmental policy will be one of the most critical challenges humanity has faced in history. Corporations have been behind the failure of the UN, most recently at the UNFCCC conference in Durban, to agree effective climate change policies. TNCs are now pushing to expand privatisation of nature as a solution to the environmental crisis at the UN Rio+20 Earth Summit in June 2012. How can we stop them?

  5. Uruguay

    18 September 2014
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    The EU Crisis Pocket Guide

    06 November 2012
    Primer

    A useful pocket guide on how a crisis made in Wall Street was made worse by EU policies, how it has enriched the 1% to the detriment of the 99%, and outlining some possible solutions that prioritise people and the environment above corporate profits.

  7. Corporate Conquistadors

    • Philippa de Boissière, Joanna Cabello, Thomas McDonagh, Aldo Orellana López, Jim Shultz, Pascoe Sabido, Rachel Tansey, Sian Cowman
    01 December 2014
    Report

    An examination of the destructive environmental record of Repsol, Glencore Xstrata and Enel-Endesa in Latin America and worldwide is clear evidence that transnational corporations should have no place in decision-making around the climate.

  8. Wind energy development in Mexico: an authoritarian populist development project?

    • Gerardo A. Torres Contreras
    17 March 2018
    Paper

    What are the current context and consequences of Mexico's wind energy policy in the rural setting of the Isthmus of Tehuantepec?

  9. The State of Corporate Power

    Brid Brennan
    22 January 2014
    Article

    Transnational corporations, particularly gas & oil industry, and banking have continued to benefit extraordinarily from the ongoing economic and financial crisis, says Brid Brennan, who presents TNI's State of Power Report 2014 at the Public Eye Awards in Davos.

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    Global Tree Plantation Expansion

    • Markus Kröger
    16 October 2012
    Paper

    The expansion of tree plantations and non-food crops is frequently left out of analysis on land grabbing, but is a crucial part of the picture. This paper provides an up-to-date review of tree plantations worldwide and summarises the latest research and data on their impact.

  11. U2's Bono is a regular at the World Economic Forum

    Davos and its danger to Democracy

    Nick Buxton
    18 January 2016
    Article

    We are increasingly entering a world where gatherings such as Davos are not laughable billionaire playgrounds, but rather the future of global governance.

  12. European and Canadian civil society groups call for rejection of CETA

    29 November 2016
    Article

    Joint Statement : 455 European and Canadian civil society groups call for rejection of CETA

  13. The Global Land Grab

    11 October 2012
    Primer

    A concise and indispensable critical guide to the global phenomenon of land grabbing. Find out how the global land grab is justified, what is driving it, why transparency and guidelines won't stop it, and learn about alternatives that could enable people and communities to regain control of their land and territories.

  14. The Global Ocean Grab: A Primer

    • Jennifer Franco, Pietje Vervest, Timothé Feodoroff, Carsten Pedersen, Ricarda Reuter, Mads Christian Barbesgaard
    02 September 2014
    Primer

    This primer unveils a new wave of ocean grabbing, answering the most important questions about the mechanisms that facilitate it and the impacts on people and the environment.

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    How international rules on countering the financing of terrorism impact civil society

    • Ben Hayes
    08 May 2013
    Policy briefing

    Making banks and non-profits liable for the acts and social networks of their customers and beneficiaries while holding charities and CSOs responsible for the ‘extremist’ views and actions of their associates stifles freedom of association and expression and promotes self-censorship.

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    Drugs programme activities 1997-2009

    Drugs and Democracy
    01 March 2009
    Article

    Summary of TNI's involvement on the Drugs issue since 1998 and until March 2009.

  17. Discover the dark side of Investment

    27 June 2012
    Article

    Introduction to the international investment regime, including key facts, links to useful resources and ideas for action.

  18. The Global Water Grab: A Primer

    • Jennifer Franco, Satoko Kishimoto, Sylvia Kay, Timothé Feodoroff, Gloria Pracucci
    20 October 2014
    Primer

    Water grabbing refers to situations where powerful actors take control of valuable water resources  for their own benefit, depriving local communities whose livelihoods often depend on these resources and ecosystems.