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  1. Bolivia: The Left in Power

    • Linda Farthing
    02 October 2018
    Paper

    Social movements need to grapple with not only building successful political parties and winning power but also with using that power strategically to best implement change. This report examines the critical role played by Movimiento al Socialismo (MAS) government employees and the challenges they faced in advancing a social and economic justice agenda within Bolivia. How can progressive government employees remain true to their political ideology while ensuring the execution of a professional and fair public bureaucracy?

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    BRICS and MICs in Bolivia’s ‘value’-chain agriculture

    • Ben McKay
    18 May 2015
    Paper

    A new phase of ‘foreignization’ and land grabbing is occurring via value-chain relations in Bolivia. Exogenous forces from some BRICS and MICs are penetrating Bolivia’s countryside and drastically changing social relations of production, reproduction, property and power.

  3. D-Day for Bolivia’s coca chewing amendment

    Martin Jelsma
    03 February 2011
    Article

    Bolivias proposed amendment to the UN Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs (1961) lays bare U.S. hypocrisy and the European divide.

  4. Hojas de coca

    Migrants and Traditional Use

    Pien Metaal, Constanza Sánchez, Natalia Rebollo
    25 April 2019
    Article

    How to reconcile migrant communities’ right to the enjoyment of cultural life (including the use of traditional plants) with international drug control obligations.

  5. “A Declaration of War on Us”: The 2018 VFV Law Amendment and its Impact on Ethnic Nationalities

    Transnational Institute (TNI)
    13 December 2018
    Article

    The right to land for all peoples is essential for peace, democracy and development.

  6. D-Day for Bolivia’s coca chewing amendment

    Martin Jelsma
    31 January 2011
    Other news

    Today is the deadline for countries to submit objections to Bolivia’s proposed amendment to remove the ban on coca leaf chewing in the 1961 UN Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs. As far as we know, six countries have formally notified the UN that they reject Bolivia’s amendment: the United States (January 19), Sweden (Jan 20), the United Kingdom (Jan 21), Canada (Jan 26), Denmark (Jan 28) and Germany (Jan 28). Some other European countries may add their objections today.

  7. Examining Barcelona en Comu's attempt to be a movement-party

    06 March 2018
    Paper

    The radical citizens' movement and party, Barcelona en Comú, has a goal of democratizing the relationship between civil society and city institutions by transforming the traditional structures of political parties and creating new formsof democratic political participation. Through the study of one of the city's many neighbourhood assemblies, Zelinka examines whether it is possible for a political organization to be movement and institution at the same time and what kind of challenges, conflicts and opportunities emerge through this undertaking.

  8. Opposing the Coca Chewing Amendment?

    Pien Metaal
    13 January 2011
    Other news

    In March 2009, Bolivia's President Evo Morales chewed a coca leaf at the UN High Level session on drugs in Vienna. He announced he would seek the abolition of the articles in the 1961 UN Single Convention that stipulate that the chewing of coca leaves should be eliminated within 25 years, after the treaty entered into force.

  9. Amendment against anti-coca chewing provisions

    Martin Jelsma, Pien Metaal
    21 July 2009
    Article

    In March 2009, Evo Morales sent his formal request to the Secretary General Bang Ki Moon to delete articles 49(c) and 49(e) of the 1961 UN Single Convention that explicitly mention that "coca leaf chewing must be abolished with twenty-five years from the coming into force of this Convention" (which happened in December 1964). The request will be discussed on Thursday, 30 July, at the annual meeting of the UN Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC). Putting this request on the ECOSOC agenda is a required procedure for amendment proposals. It is under Agenda item 14 (d), Narcotic drugs, General Segment (see the Note of Secretary General).

  10. Spanish municipal elections

    Sol Trumbo Vila
    05 June 2019
    Article

    With the results still playing out, the survival of parties like Barcelona en Comú will depend on their ability to bring together the ‘three souls’ of the movement.

  11. Objections to Bolivia's reservation to allow coca chewing in the UN conventions

    Tom Blickman
    09 January 2013
    Article

    Sweden joined the United States and the United Kingdom in objecting to the re-accession of Bolivia to the 1961 UN Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs. Italy and Canada also objected, but the objection of Sweden is particularly disturbing.

  12. Objections and support for Bolivia's coca amendment

    01 March 2011
    Other news

    After the closure of the January 31, 2011, deadline to file objections to the Bolivian amendment to remove the ban on coca leaf chewing in the 1961 UN Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs, 18 objections were submitted. Although not required, four countries explicitly submitted their support: Spain, Ecuador, Venezuela and Costa Rica. Egypt, Macedonia and Colombia withdrew their objections.

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    US, Few Others Object to Bolivia UN Coca-Chewing Bid

    04 January 2013
    In the media

    Formal objections from four Western countries are the latest twist in Bolivia's effort to remove the international proscription on the ancestral habit of coca leaf chewing.

  14. support-coca-chewing

    Objections to Bolivia's reservation to allow coca chewing in the UN conventions

    Tom Blickman
    03 January 2013
    Article

    Sweden joined the United States and the United Kingdom in objecting to the re-accession of Bolivia to the 1961 UN Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs after Bolivia had denounced the convention and asked for re-accession with a reservation that allows for the traditional age-old ancestral habit of coca chewing in the country. Italy and Canada also objected, but the objection of Sweden is particularly disturbing.

    Foglia di coca, la congiura degli ipocriti, versione in italiana

  15. Bolivia fights objections to coca-leaf chewing

    28 January 2011
    Article

    Bolivia will ask the United Nations to organize a conference on coca leaf-chewing if the U.S., Britain and Sweden don't withdraw their objections to the country's efforts to drop the ban on the age-old practice in an international treaty, Bolivia's U.N. ambassador said Friday.

  16. The U.S. Can Still Correct its Position on Bolivia's UN Coca Chewing Amendment

    28 January 2011
    Press release

    The Washington Office on Latin America (WOLA), the Andean Information Network (AIN), and more than 200 other concerned organizations and individuals yesterday sent a letter to U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, calling for the Obama administration to immediately withdraw its objection to Bolivia’s proposed amendment to the 1961 United Nations Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs.

  17. CETA: Feiten en fabels

    • Bas van Beek, Sophia Beunder, Roeline Knottnerus, Jilles Mast, Roos van Os, Bart-Jaap Verbeek, Hilde van der Pas
    21 June 2018
    Report

    Zijn handelsverdragen als CETA werkelijk goed voor de economie en de werkgelegenheid?

  18. Proposal of amendments by Bolivia to the 1961 Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs

    15 May 2009

    The Secretary-General has received a note verbale dated 12 March 2009 from the Permanent Mission of Bolivia to the United Nations, attached to which is a letter from the President of Bolivia, Evo Morales Ayma, dated 12 March 2009, in which the Government of Bolivia proposes to amend article 49, paragraphs 1 (c) and 2 (e), of the Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs, 1961, as amended by the Protocol amending the Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs, 1961 (see annex).

     

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    UN accepts “coca leaf chewing” in Bolivia

    14 January 2013
    In the media

    Bolivia will again belong to the 1961 Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs after its bid to rejoin with a reservation that it does not accept the treaty’s requirement that “coca leaf chewing must be banned” was successful Friday. Opponents needed one-third of the 184 signatory countries to object, but fell far, far short despite objections by the US and the International Narcotics Control Board.

  20. The Challenges of Medicinal Cannabis in Colombia

    • Nicolás Martínez Rivera
    29 October 2019
    Policy briefing

    In July 2016, the Colombian government enacted Law 1787, which regulates the use of medicinal cannabis and its trade in the country. With this decision and a series of subsequent resolutions, Colombia joined the more than a dozen countries that have put into practice different types of regulation to explore the advantages of this plant as an alternative pharmaceutical.

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