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2126 items
  1. Interview with Satoko Kishimoto

    Satoko Kishimoto
    23 April 2018
    Article

    The debate on alternatives to privatised ownership models for public services is back on the academic and political agenda. So what's new?

  2. Criminalisation of environmental harm

    Katerina Gladkova
    23 April 2018
    Article

    The joint report produced by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) and INTERPOL in 2016 paints a rather grim picture of the extent of environmental crime worldwide. It identifies it as the fourth largest criminal enterprise globally, right behind drug smuggling, counterfeiting, and human trafficking. Two questions are worth pondering here: to quote George Monbiot, how did we get into this mess and what can we do about it?

  3. “The drug market is thriving” while the Commission on Narcotic Drugs limps along

    Ann Fordham
    11 April 2018
    Article

    The admission by UN's lead agency for drugs, the UNODC,  that “the drug market is thriving” in its 2017 World Drug Report is an important one given that it is months away from 2019 – the target date by which governments committed to “significantly reduce or eliminate” the global drug market. At the recent annual gathering of the Commission on Narcotic Drugs (CND) in Vienna, this abysmal failure to claim any progress towards these  ‘drug-free’ targets was the backdrop to the latest round of tense negotiations on global drug control.

  4. Lula, Ricardo Stuckert (CLACSO)

    Lula for beginners

    Pablo Gentili
    09 April 2018
    Article

    The forces that shaped modern Brazil made the rise of a figure such as Lula da Silva all but inevitable. Conditions in Brazil today mean his imprisonment is certainly not the end of this chapter in the nation's story. Pablo Gentili, Executive Secretary of the Latin American Council of Social Sciences (CLACSO), analyses the  parallel between Brazil's history and the story of its most charismatic leader.

  5. The future for democratic public water: resistance and alternatives

    Satoko Kishimoto, Leandro Bonecini
    05 April 2018
    Article

    The Alternative World Water Forum - FAMA, held from March 17th to 22nd in Brasilia attracted 7,000 people from almost every state in Brazil. FAMA sent a clear message that it would not engage with the opaque 8th World Water Forum, hosted by the private think-tank World Water Council and its corporate partners. The World Water Council has fostered pro-privatisation policy debates for decades.

  6. Resistance and defence of water and territories in Brazil

    Leandro Bonecini, Satoko Kishimoto
    04 April 2018
    Article

    Nearly 7,000 people from more than 30 countries, and from almost every Brazilian state, gathered at the Alternative World Water Forum (FAMA) from 17 to 22 March 2018. The purpose of this mobilisation was to challenge the legitimacy of the World Water Forum, which is organised every three years by the private think-tank World Water Council together with its corporate partners.

  7. Atlas of Utopias

    • Transnational Institute (TNI)
    21 March 2018
    Infograph

    The Atlas of Utopias is a global gallery of inspiring community-led transformation in water, energy and housing. It features 32 communities from 19 countries working on bold solutions to our world’s systemic economic, social and ecological crises.

  8. Regulating Cannabis in Accord with International Law: Options to Explore

    16 March 2018 - Event
    As a growing number of countries move towards legal regulation for non-medical cannabis, governments are pushing the boundaries of the three UN drug control treaties. At the 61st session of the Commission on Narcotic Drugs (CND), TNI will co-organise a side event to explore the issue, addressing the various challenges and opportunities involved.
  9. The twin challenge of agrarian and climate justice

    • Jun Borras, Jennifer Franco, Clara Mi Young Park, Mads Christian Barbesgaard, Yukari Sekine, Ye Lin Myint, Thant Zin
    02 March 2018
    Paper

    Dominant approaches to climate change mitigation are putting new pressures on small farmers and village dwellers, justifying dispossession by powerful actors who cast villagers' traditional ways of life as ecologically destructive or economically inefficient. In order to address the twin challenges of agrarian justice and climate justice, it is critical to understand the way new conflicts and initiatives intersect with old conflicts and the way they are compounded by undemocratic settings, and inequality and division along fault-lines of gender, ethnicity, class, and generation.

  10. Civil Society Statement on the EU-Indonesia Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement (CEPA)

    • Roeline Knottnerus
    28 February 2018
    Paper

    This statement has been developed jointly by Indonesian and European civil society organisations, who believe that an EU-Indonesia Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement (CEPA) must first of all be approached as a means to serve the public interest.

  11. Agrarian climate justice: Imperative and opportunity

    • Jun Borras, Jennifer Franco
    21 February 2018
    Paper

    Global pressure on land and natural resources is mounting, with mainstream narratives about climate change often intensifying pressure to replace so-called "inefficient" users of land, including small farmers and pastoralists with market-based dynamics and actors. This dynamic makes the pursuit of socially just land policy ever more important and urgent, while at the same time creating new challenges. The fundamental connections and tensions between agrarian and climate justice must be reckoned with, and movements on both sides must deepen their understanding.

  12. The EU - Indonesia CEPA negotiations

    • Roeline Knottnerus
    15 February 2018
    Paper

    What drives the negotiations for an Indonesia-Europe Comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement (CEPA) in relation to investment? What would be the merits of the alternative investment protection frameworks as proposed by Indonesia? Will it be more effective in promoting a more equitable and sustainable development? 

     
  13. Photo credit: Valentina Micheli - https://www.flickr.com/photos/valemic/

    Tourism and Land Grabbing in Bali

    • Ruben Rosenberg Colorni
    09 February 2018
    Report

    The island of Bali is home to a rich and unique system of agriculture, based around traditional water management systems developed over the last 1200 years. However, growing pressure from the expansion of the tourist trade as well as the effects of climate change are putting these systems at risk. Farmers are fighting to preserve their livelihoods and maintain a base for local food sovereignty in Bali, but significant changes to policy and practice are needed to protect their rights to land, water, and seed.

  14. Confronting authoritarian populism: the rural dimension

    Ian Scoones, Jun Borras, Lyda Fernanda Forero, Ruth Hall, Marc Edelman, Wendy Wolford, Benjamin White
    31 January 2018
    Article

    Religion, gender dynamics, place and cultural identity – all inform rising authoritarian populism in rural areas, alongside class interests and inequalities. Mobilising alternatives to capture by regressive political forces is not straightforward.

  15. Will 'climate smart agriculture' serve the public interest - or the drive for growing profits for private corporations?

    Zoe Brent, Jennifer Clapp, Peter Newell
    24 January 2018
    Article

    'Climate smart agriculture' has become the buzz phrase at high level international policy discussions.  Will it be the latest manifestation of greenwashing of  unsustainable industrial agriculture or the basis for developing real, grassroots-led, resilient food systems?

  16. turbine transport

    Combatting Energy Poverty in El Cua, Nicaragua

    M’Lisa Colbert
    24 January 2018
    Article

    Community members banded together in a show of solidarity, committing to collective ownership and equity, transparency, and direct participation in the development and management of their energy infrastructure. This impressive collective commitment has transformed a once-rural village of just over 3,000 residents in the 1980s into a thriving urban metropolis of more than 40,000 residents today.

  17. Turin: The long march towards water remunicipalisation

    Mariangela Rosolen
    24 January 2018
    Article

    On 9 October 2017, the Turin City Council turned back privatisation and took another step towards the remunicipalisation of its metropolitan water system. And so the city entered the next phase of its long march towards water sovereignty, begun in the aftermath of the Second World War on the ruins of a town half-destroyed by allied bombing and by Nazi/Fascist retaliations against the democratic popular resistance.

  18. State of Power 2018

    17 January 2018
    Report

    Popular movements everywhere are on the rise at the same time as we face ever-greater corporate impunity and increasing state violence. In TNI's seventh flagship State of Power report, we examine today's social movements, their potential to build counter-power, and how we can best resist injustice as well as lay grounds for long-term transformation.

  19. Drawing strength from our ancestors

    17 January 2018

    Bertha Zúñiga Cáceres talks about how her mother's example and a belief that ancestors continue to accompany our struggles helps her and the indigenous movement in Honduras to continue to mobilise against injustice, state violence and corporate abuses.

  20. We need massroots, not grassroots movements

    17 January 2018

    Medha Patkar of the National Peoples' Alliance shares her thoughts on how to build powerful movements based on three decades of campaigning in India against mega-dams and other forms of unsustainable and exploitative development.

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