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10 items
  1. Visit to Brazilian bio-ethanol plant

    EU bioenergy use: the invisible social and environmental harms

    Katie Sandwell, Lyda Fernanda Forero
    08 December 2016
    Article

    The EU's reputation for clean and sustainable energy conceals a dirtier reality, particularly where renewable energy policies and development are driven by corporate interests. Today, nearly two thirds of all “renewable” energy in the EU comes from bio-energy. Although bio-energy appears to provide a sustainable alternative to fossil fuels, there are serious questions about its actual emissions profile, and about environmental and social conflicts which are created or exacerbated by the industrial-scale production of biomass to meet European energy needs.

  2. A bioenergy sorghum crop is harvested near College Station. (Texas A&M AgriLife Research photo)

    Bioenergy in the EU

    • Bente Hessellund Andersen
    08 December 2016
    Report

    The European Union’s approach to bioenergy is shaped by contradictory policies. Climate concerns are highlighted in public discourse and assure broad public support for renewable energy, including bioenergy. Meanwhile, however, the EU’s corporate growth and trade agenda promotes the use of energy that actually increases the EU’s footprint on land elsewhere, with significant implications for environmental and social justice.

  3. Call for papers: Agro-extractivism inside and outside BRICS

    06 May 2016
    Article

    The BRICS Initiative (Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa) for Critical Agrarian Studies (BICAS) is collaborating with several initiatives and institutions to hold an international conference with emphasis on agrarian change inside and outside BRICS countries in the context of global flows of capital, labor and agro-commodities from October 24-26 at China Agricultural University, Beijing. The deadline for abstracts is June 15, 2016

  4. Destructive biofuels and wood-based biomass out of next Renewable Energy Directive say 115 organisations to EU renewables consultation

    10 February 2016
    Press release

    Campaigners say: False solutions to climate change do not cut emissions but damage land and livelihoods in other countries

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    Emerging Trends in Global Commodities Markets

    • Carolina Milhorance de Castro
    18 May 2015
    Paper

    Drawing on the wider political economy of global commodities markets, this paper analyses the dynamics of agrarian change related to the rise of emerging economies.

  6. Chinese and Other Foreign Investments in the Brazilian Soybean Complex

    • Gustavo de L. T. Oliveira
    18 May 2015
    Paper

    As Brazil and China become the world’s leading exporter and importer of soybeans respectively, Chinese companies have sought investments in Brazil to wrest greater control over the flows and profits of the international soybean trade from North Atlantic-based transnational companies. While some promote these as positive “South-South cooperation”, many others condemn them as neocolonial “land grabs” that displace peasants, cause environmental degradation, and deindustrialize the Brazilian economy.

  7. The Sugarcane Industry and the global economic crisis

    • Maria Luisa Mendonça, Fabio T. Pitta, Carlos Vinicius Xavier
    18 July 2013
    Paper

    An examination of ethanol production in Brazil, highlighting the role of financial capital, the territorial expansion of agribusiness and the impacts on labour relations and indigenous peoples and peasant farmers.

  8. Governing the Global Land Grab

    • Jennifer Franco, Jun Borras, Chunyu Wang
    19 June 2013
    Policy briefing

    The rise of flex crops—crops with multiple uses across food, feed, fuel and industrial complexes—has far-reaching implications for global land governance.
     

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    Video: The causes of the global food crisis

    Philip McMichael
    24 August 2012
    Multi-media

    The global food crisis seems the result of moving to increasingly unsustainable, simplified and industrialised agriculture, neoliberal foodspeculation and landgrabbing.

  10. New Biofuel Project in Isabela

    Jennifer Franco, Danny Carranza, Joann Fernandez (Rightsnet)
    07 October 2011
    Article

    A Philippines biofuel project would appear to fit the World Bank's definition of a "win-win" scenario with its promise of jobs and conversion of 'idle land'. However a closer look unveils corporate manipulation, political corruption and exploitation of subsistence farmers that typically accompanies so-called "responsible investment"