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11 items
  1. Financialisation: A Primer

    • Frances Thomson, Sahil Dutta
    13 September 2018
    Primer

    A beginner’s guide to financialisation: how it works, how it shapes our lives, the forces that lie behind it, and how we can resist.

  2. Our land is worth more than carbon

    17 November 2016
    Article

    The Paris Agreement required the 196 Parties to the UN Climate Convention to limit temperature increases to 2° or 1.5°C below preindustrial levels. While COP21 benefited from a high degree of mobilization linked to the adoption of an international agreement, COP 22 on the other hand has received rather less attention. Yet the stakes remain significant. In its haste, COP 22, being called the “action COP” or the “agriculture COP”, is in danger of adopting various misguided solutions for agriculture.

  3. Neoliberal Sustainability? The Biopolitical Dynamics of “Green” Capitalism

    • Karijn van den Berg
    04 February 2016
    Paper

    “Sustainable citizenship”: To what extent is such an idea and promotion of sustainability actually sustainable and can it contribute to decreasing climate change? Or can and should it rather be dismissed as a neoliberal strategy to control consumers and their choices? And which subjects do actually get such citizen responsibilities?

  4. The Political Economy of Oil Palm as a Flex Crop

    • Alberto Alonso-Fradejas, Juan Liu, Tania Salerno, Yunan Xu
    19 May 2015
    Paper

    The ‘how’ and ‘why’ of oil palm flexing is heavily influenced by a synthesis of forces and relations within and around the oil palm value web. These dynamics impact the way flexing among oil palm’s different uses is influenced and/or carried out by various powerful actors within the state, the private sector, and civil society.

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    Anglo American's negative influence on climate policies exposed

    03 December 2014
    Press release

    Multinational corporations such as Anglo American undermine crucial climate policies and promote false solutions, which allow them to profit from the climate crisis, according to a new report released 8 December during the UN climate talks.

     
  6. Anglo American’s dirty energy lobby and its false climate solutions

    • Lyda Fernanda Forero, Lúcia Ortiz, Pascoe Sabido, Rachel Tansey, Danilo Urrea, Sara Shaw
    03 December 2014
    Report

    Climate talks in Lima will be subject to intense lobbying by some of the biggest industrial polluters. They not only cause serious social and environmental conflicts where they extract fossil fuels, their capture of decision-making also prevents a real solution to the climate crisis.

  7. Corporate Conquistadors

    • Philippa de Boissière, Joanna Cabello, Thomas McDonagh, Aldo Orellana López, Jim Shultz, Pascoe Sabido, Rachel Tansey, Sian Cowman
    01 December 2014
    Report

    An examination of the destructive environmental record of Repsol, Glencore Xstrata and Enel-Endesa in Latin America and worldwide is clear evidence that transnational corporations should have no place in decision-making around the climate.

  8. The Politics of Sugarcane flexing in Brazil and beyond

    • Ben McKay, Sérgio Sauer, Ben Richardson, Roman Herre
    15 September 2014
    Report

    Flex crops, spread over greater expanses of land, are increasingly interlinked through international exchange in food, feed and fuel. Brazilian exports of sugarcane ethanol to the US are in part influenced by the domestic US production of maize ethanol, which in turn is shaped by the price of feed and the soybean supply.

  9. The Politics of Flexing Soybeans in China and Brazil

    • Gustavo de L. T. Oliveira, Mindi Schneider
    15 September 2014
    Report

    The trajectories of soy developments in Brazil and China are related despite moving largely in opposite directions.

  10. Flex trees

    • Markus Kröger
    20 June 2014
    Report

    Flex trees seem to offer timely opportunities for socio-environmentally sustainable solutions, but also present dangers, particularly if such changes accelerate the concentration of land and plantation-based development, whereby forests compete with and may replace food production.

  11. The Politics of Flex crops and Commodities

    • Jennifer Franco, Jun Borras, Pietje Vervest, S. Ryan Isakson, Les Levidow
    20 June 2014
    Report

    Flex crops are crops that can be used for food, feed, fuel or industrial material. Their emergence as critical global commodities is integral to understanding today's agroindustrial economy.