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1251 items
  1. About drug law reform in Argentina

    30 June 2015
    Primer

    Argentina has been developing criminal laws on these substances since 1924, but their repressive aspects have become more pronounced since the 1970s. The growing persecution resulting from these laws has mainly fallen on drug users and minor players linked to trafficking activities.

  2. About drug law reform in Bolivia

    30 June 2015
    Primer

    The current law prohibits drug use and punishes possession for personal use with internment and forced treatment. Domestically, a legal market for coca leaf has always existed and Bolivia is trying to change the international legal regime for the coca leaf.

  3. About drug law reform in Brazil

    30 June 2015
    Primer

    Brazil is debating reform of current drug legislation. Changes to the Criminal Code are being discussed in Senate and the debate includes new articles on drugs. Several legal bills to reform the existing drug law are waiting to be reviewed. 

  4. About drug law reform in Paraguay

    30 June 2015
    Primer

    In Paraguay, a new drug law in 1988 exempted from punishment those in possession of a maximum of 2 grams of cocaine or heroin and 10 grams of marijuana for personal consumption.

     

  5. About drug law reform in Peru

    30 June 2015
    Primer

    According to, Peruvian laws consumption or possession of controlled substances for personal use is not punishable, it is estimated that 60 percent of detentions on drug charges are related to use or simple possession. Moreover, the penalties for drug related crimes are relatively high and disproportionate, and infringe upon fundamental rights such as freedom, due process and other judicial guarantees. The penalty for small scale sales of drugs is between one to eight years in prison, according to the Criminal Code.

  6. About drug law reform in Venezuela

    30 June 2015
    Primer

    In 1993, Venezuela replaced prison sentences with ‘social security measures’ for possession of up to 2 grams of cocaine and 20 grams of cannabis. Possession for personal use is punished with referral to treatment, which can still lead to obligatory internment in specialized centers.

     

  7. About drug law reform in Honduras

    30 June 2015
    Primer

    Under Decree 126/89, the cultivation and production and the trafficking and transport of drugs are punishable as crimes, as is the illicit use and possession of drugs. Article 7 prohibits the production, planting, cultivation and gathering of plants or seeds that contain ingredients that may be considered narcotics or controlled substances.

  8. About drug law reform in El Salvador

    30 June 2015
    Primer

    As a result of a truce between the country’s main gangs (Maras), the number of murders in El Salvador so far in 2013 is down by about 45 per cent in comparison to the year before. Since El Salvador is one of the countries with the highest murder rates in the world (71 per 100,000 people in 2011), the truce represents a step forward in the eradication of street violence and, some believe, in the fight against the retail drug trade and trafficking.

  9. About drug law reform in Ecuador

    29 June 2015
    Primer

    Ecuador is going through a process of reform of its legislation on drugs and the related institutional structure. The government of Rafael Correa is pushing forward this process, which began in 2008 with a new constitution that led to the declaration of an amnesty for small-scale traffickers. In February 2014 parliament approved the Organic Criminal Procedures Code. This replaces the criminal offences section of Law 108, a piece of legislation infamous for its harshly disproportionate sentences and drive to prosecute. As a result of the amnesty and the new legislation, thousands of people were freed from prison. Al the beginning of 2015 the National Congress started to debate a proposed Organic Law on the Integrated Prevention of Drugs and the Use of Controlled Substances, a bill which seeks to replace what remains of the old law.

  10. Central and Eastern European countries at the crossroads

    • Pietje Vervest, Cecilia Olivet
    26 June 2015
    Report

    Central and Eastern European (CEE) countries find themselves at a crossroad regarding their investment protection policies with the US. This briefing provides evidence that shows that including investment arbitration in the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) will worsen the capacity for CEE governments to regulate.

  11. About drug law reform in Costa Rica

    19 June 2015
    Primer

    In contrast to other Central American countries, the possession of drugs for immediate personal use is not a criminal offence in Costa Rica. In August 2013 the cultivation, manufacture, transport and trafficking of drugs have all been made a criminal offence under the same article, which provides for a prison sentence of between 8 and 15 years without making any distinction between the offences. The government of Costa Rica supports the launch of an open international debate on the issue, but has declared itself against decriminalisation.

  12. Drug policy and incarceration in São Paulo, Brazil

    • Juliana de Oliveira Carlos
    14 June 2015

    This briefing paper analyses the impact of drug policy on incarceration in São Paulo (Brazil). This research is expected to inform and assess some of the consequences of the current Brazilian drug policy, taking into account its impacts on prisoners’rights and on the criminal justice system as a whole.

  13. The 2015 Commission on Narcotic Drugs

    • International Drug Policy Consortium (IDPC)
    14 June 2015

    The international drug control regime is facing the most profound challenge of its existence. Member states have for some time been experimenting with new responses to the ‘world drug problem’; however, the advent of legally regulated cannabis markets has resulted in a ratcheting up of these challenges to expose the system to new levels of strain. With the 2016 UN General Assembly Special Session (UNGASS) on the world drug problem fast approaching, how will the international community make use of the opportunity it provides for a free and open debate?

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    Cardinal Points - Photo Exhibition

    12 June 2015
    Report

    For personal and professional reasons my life revolves around four cardinal points that ultimately are two: the South and the North. The South of Latin America and the North of Europe; Uruguay and the Netherlands; Montevideo and Amsterdam. The South often expands into the East of Asia or the West of Africa, and the North extends to the West of the Americas or the East of the Mediterranean.

  15. TTIP Why the Rest of the World should Beware

    • Manuel Pérez-Rocha
    03 June 2015
    Paper

    Why should human rights, environmental and consumer advocate organizations all over the world that are working toward a world different from the corporate-led neoliberal dogma, pay special attention to TTIP?

  16. Drug law reform in Guatemala

    01 June 2015
    Primer

    Overview of drug policies, drug laws and legislative trends in Guatemala

  17. Annual Report 2014

    01 June 2015
    Annual report

    in 2014, we celebrated TNI’s four decades of work with considerable pride. Heart-warming messages poured in, affirming our continued value, relevance and impact.

    Much has changed, but looking back we can see TNI has consistently accompanied and supported some of the most significant struggles of the times – against military dictatorships, Apartheid, nuclear weapons, Third World debt, structural adjustment programmes, corporate-led globalisation – and continues to do so.

    2014 shows the power and impact that ‘ideas into movement’ can have.

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