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1314 items
  1. Blue Growth and Ocean Grabbing: A Historical Materialist Perspective on Fisheries in East Africa

    • Florian Doerr
    04 February 2016
    Paper

    The concepts of “accumulation by dispossession” and “ocean grabbing” are applied to East Africa in order to explain the ongoing dispossession of small scale fisheries. The emergence of a corporate (sea) food regime can be traced, posing challenges for terrestrial food sovereignty via land grabbing and ocean grabbing.

  2. Neoliberal Sustainability? The Biopolitical Dynamics of “Green” Capitalism

    • Karijn van den Berg
    04 February 2016
    Paper

    “Sustainable citizenship”: To what extent is such an idea and promotion of sustainability actually sustainable and can it contribute to decreasing climate change? Or can and should it rather be dismissed as a neoliberal strategy to control consumers and their choices? And which subjects do actually get such citizen responsibilities?

  3. Land Confiscations and Collective Action in Myanmar’s Dawei Special Economic Zone Area: Implications for Rural Democratization

    • Yukari Sekine
    04 February 2016
    Paper

    The recent political and economic liberalization in Burma/Myanmar, while indicative of some positive steps toward democratisation, has increased foreign and domestic investments and geared the economy toward industrialisation and large-scale agriculture. Land governance procedures and implementation tend to favour the more powerful and well-connected, with little protection mechanism for the majority smallholding farmers in the country.

  4. Reinvigorating the Public Sector: the Case of Food Security, Small-scale Farmers, Trade, and Intellectual Property Rules

    • Susan Bragdon
    04 February 2016
    Paper

    Governments are facing an existential crisis with respect to food security. What is their role in ensuring local food security and supporting domestic agricultural sectors, and particularly small- scale farmers, while the world is increasingly looking to market-based solutions to meet global food security needs?

  5. Opium meets Development: Exploring the Opium Question in Contemporary Afghanistan

    • Mariam Morid
    04 February 2016
    Paper

    In light of the April 2016 United Nations General Assembly Special Session (UNGASS), a change of the global order on drug policy should be made. Any outcome of UNGASS  will have essential developmental impacts on Afghanistan’s economy and especially on those involved in the agricultural production side of the opium economy that is farmers and farm-workers.

     

  6. The challenge of the Voluntary Guidelines in the Context of National Food Security

    • Zoe Brent, Alberto Alonso-Fradejas, Saturnino M. Borras Jr., Gonzalo Colque, Sérgio Sauer
    04 February 2016
    Paper

    The approval of the Voluntary Guidelines on Responsible Governance of Tenure of Land, Fisheries and Forests in the Context of National Food Security in 2012 marked a historic victory. The high level of participation of civil society organizations and social movements in the negotiation of every word of this text sets this global policy document apart from the majority of other initiatives of this nature, to date.

  7. Is there a Global Environmental Justice Movement?

    • Joan Martinez‐Alier, Leah Temper, Daniela Del Bene, Arnim Scheidel
    04 February 2016
    Paper

    Changes in the economy economy in terms of growing flows of energy and materials are leading to the existence of a rural and urban global movement for environmental justice.  And not only complaints, there are also many successful examples of stopping projects and developing alternatives.

  8. Large-scale forest plantations for climate change mitigation? New frontiers of deforestation and land grabbing in Cambodia

    • Arnim Scheidel, Courtney Work
    04 February 2016
    Paper

    The desperate search for ways to combat climate change gives rise to new mitigation policies and projects, such as the support of large-scale ‘sustainable ’ forestry plantations. However, climate justice and climate mitigation cannot be met as long as large-scale industrial plantations continue to marginalise small-scale indigenous forest users who actively protect biodiverse forests.

  9. Flexibilising global agri-biomass value chains: a techno-market fix for resource burdens?

    • Les Levidow
    04 February 2016
    Paper

    An eco-efficient bioeconomy, combining environmental sustainability and economic advantage, has been promoted to alleviate resource constraints of rising global demand. For political forces resisting environmental degradation and people’s dispossession, several means are necessary to contest this global agenda and counterpose alternatives.

  10. Blue Carbon: Ocean Grabbing in Disguise?

    • Mads Christian Barbesgaard
    01 February 2016
    Policy issue

    Will blue carbon projects have similar consequences for coastal communities as the negative socio-ecological impact from the market-based mitigation efforts on land (REDD-ii)

  11. The Meaning of Land in Myanmar

    • Jennifer Franco, Hannah Twomey, Khu Khu Ju, Pietje Vervest, Tom Kramer
    28 January 2016
    Primer

    “Land is like our vein; it is vital for our living. After our land was confiscated, we don’t know what to do for our livelihood,” says a farmer from Kachin State in Myanmar. Today many inhabitants of rural communities in Myanmar live under threat of losing their lands in a battle for resources spurred by ethnic conflict, exploitative land laws, and powerful economic actors. The existence of a legal right to the land does not translate into that right being respected in practice, and people across the country are now working to protect their right to the land.

  12. State of Power 2016 report front cover thumbnail

    Illustration notes for the State of Power 2016

    20 January 2016
    Report

    For the State of Power 2016 report, designer Evan Clayburg made illustrations reflecting relevant situations to the chapters in the report. Read his notes accompanying these illustrations. 

  13. To change the heart and soul thumbnail image

    To change the heart and soul

    • Herbert Docena
    19 January 2016
    Report

    Corporate executives and climate skeptics that mobilise against strong international climate change agreements have rightly been the focus of attention of many people concerned about the climate crisis. But another group of elites—those who actually believe in climate change —may paradoxically have done more to block effective solutions to the crisis.

  14. Multi-stakeholderism: A corporate push thumbnail image

    Multi-stakeholderism: a corporate push for a new form of global governance

    • Harris Gleckman
    19 January 2016
    Report

    The World Economic Forum’s Global Redesign Initiative is perhaps the best reflection of how corporations and other elites envision the future of governance. It calls for marginalising intergovernmental decision-making with a system of multi-stakeholder governance, but what does this mean for democracy, accountability and the rule of law?

  15. Tyranny of finance thumbnail image

    The tyranny of global finance

    • Walden Bello
    19 January 2016
    Report

    Against all expectations, financial capital has emerged even stronger after the financial crisis having staved off regulation and putting the blame on public spending. But its victory is likely a pyrrhic one as a new crisis looms, one in which the global public could learn from victories such as reforms in Iceland and finally reassert its control over money.

  16. Economics as ideology thumbnail image

    Economics as ideology: challenging expert political power

    • Elaine Coburn
    19 January 2016
    Report

    Economics often appears boring, but this narrow, mostly male dominated profession decides on matters intimately bound up with questions of power, democracy and vital matters of health, education, social welfare and the environment. Meaningful democracy requires the participation of ordinary people in economic debates, so that they can shape their own lives in solidarity with others.

  17. The Global Post-Democratic Order thumbnail image

    The global post-democratic order

    • Leigh Phillips
    19 January 2016
    Report

    In the era of globalisation, the steady removal of decision-making from democratic chambers by EU elites is serving as a blueprint for post-democratic governance around the world. Progressives must be ambitious and start putting forward ideas for a democratic world government as a viable alternative.

  18. Democracy is dead: Long live democracies!

    • Hilary Wainwright
    18 January 2016
    Report

    Building a real democracy in the face of corporate and financial power will require a rethinking of power and agency, unleashing the creative, experimental, knowledge-sharing and emancipatory approaches of social movements.

  19. State of Power 2016 report front cover thumbnail

    State of Power 2016

    18 January 2016
    Report

    TNI's fifth annual State of Power 2016 report explores the intersect of power and democracy. Featuring prominent activists and academics, its essays feature the long battle between economic power and popular democracy, expose the different powers seeking to undermine democracy today, and tell the stories of radical popular democratic alternatives emerging worldwide.

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