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1128 items
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    Reforming public water services

    • Satoko Kishimoto
    01 June 2009
    Primer

    Q and As on why reforming public water services is the best way to deliver clean water to all.

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    Public Services

    25 January 2006
    Article
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    Public Services

    18 May 2006
    Article
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    Public Service Reform – Geordie Style

    Henry Kippin
    21 April 2009
    In the media
    The book "Public Service Reform…but not as we know it!" is a timely reminder of the public sector’s capacity to drive internal reform and cost savings – based on a case study of Newcastle Council’s ICT infrastructure over the last nine years.
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    Public Water Services

    Satoko Kishimoto
    01 May 2006
    Article

    Innovative approaches based on citizens' engagement have substantially improved public water and sanitation services in developing countries. Olivier Hoedeman, Satoko Kishimoto and Philipp Terhorst, who edited the recently published book Reclaiming Public Water, discuss specific democratic utility reforms that have led to improved services, and the political and financial hurdles that hinder public utilities from achieving success.

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    Public service reform but not as we know it

    09 June 2009
    In the media

    Newcastle City Councils public services reform shatters the myth that public sectors cannot reform and improve themselves. As much as £3.5 billion could be saved if Government followed its example.

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    Reactions to Michael Shuman's article

    Michael Shuman
    01 May 2006
    Article
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    Public service reform - But not as we know it! (Picnic Publishing, 2009)

    • Hilary Wainwright, Matthew Little
    17 March 2009
    Book

    "A fascinating and lively account of how it is by strengthening democracy, involving workers and citizens we can transform our public services. It truly kicks privatisation into touch!" (Baroness Helena Kennedy)

  10. Social efficiency: reforming public services in 21st Century

    Hilary Wainwright
    28 July 2010
    Article

    The ideological reasoning behind UK government policies is that the market is the only way to make public services 'efficient'. Isn't it time we talked about social efficiency, maximising public benefit rather than maximising profit?

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    Articles on War on Iraq before 2007

    01 December 2001
    Article
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    Beyond the Market: The Future of Public Services

    15 March 2007
    Book

    This yearbook proves that privatisation is not inevitable; that we can and must react to protect, preserve and reclaim our public service inheritance. It is clear that without extensive, universally distributed public services, there is no way the world can realise the United Nation's Millennium Development Goals.

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  14. One million in Europe sign for water as a public service

    14 February 2013
    Article

    ‘Water is a Human Right’ has made history as being the first European Citizen Initiative to have collected over one million signatures.

  15. Barcelona reorganises public services in the people's interest

    David Hall
    14 February 2017
    Article

    Spain maybe on the edge of a remunicipalisation renaissance, with all the relevant legal, financial and technical issues attracting surprisingly intense interest throughout the state. These trends in Spain provide inspiring examples for other countries too, in Europe and worldwide. On 1st December Barcelona City Council organised a remarkable conference on the topic.

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    Public Public Partnerships

    01 January 2015
    Collection

    TNI is advocating Public Public Partnerships (PUP) as an alternative policy to privatisation or to Public-Private Partnerships in water services as well as a concrete tool to work with partners to reform public water companies/utilities, improve services and realise the right to water on the ground. A public-public partnership (PUP) is simply collaboration between two or more public authorities or organizations, based on solidarity, to improve the capacity and effectiveness of one partner in providing public water or sanitation services. They have been described as a “peer relationship forged around common values and objectives, which exclude profit-seeking”. PUPs avoid the risks which are typically encountered in public-private partnerships: transaction costs, contract failure, renegotiation, the complexities of regulation, commercial opportunism, monopoly pricing, commercial secrecy, currency risk, and lack of public legitimacy. In general the objectives of PUPs are to improve the capacity of the assisted partner. In practice, PUPs' work can be divided into five broad categories: training and developing human resources, technical support on a wide range of issues, improving efficiency and building institutional capacity, financing water services, improving participation. Public Community Partnerships Public-communitarian partnerships (PCPs) are internationally referred to as public-public partnerships but PCPs has a stronger connotation of community. While government and public water authorities should adopt and implement a water delivery policy that prioritises serving the needs of rural communities, many state-owned utilities fail to serve hard-to-reach areas. Community-based water systems are bridging the gap in water service delivery in many parts of Asia, Africa, and Latin America. TNI has observed new forms of partnerships between public authorities and rural communities, in which the communities are engaged in the decision-making about water solutions, supported with public funding and expertise and are empowered to take responsibility for running water systems. Such partnerships can bring rapid and lasting improvements.

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    Financial Services in GATS:

    Myriam vander Stichele
    01 May 2006
    Article
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    Public service privatisation is a fast track to corruption and higher costs

    Seumas Milne
    29 September 2009
    In the media
    Public services must become the universal badge of social solidarity and citizenship they should be, not a second-class safety net for the poor.

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