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94 items
  1. Morocco and Cannabis

    • Tom Blickman
    15 March 2017
    Policy briefing

    This policy briefing discusses whether or not the aim of reducing cannabis cultivation is realistic or beneficial for Morocco, what it would actually mean for the major production area the Rif – one of the poorest, most densely populated and environmentally fragile regions in the country – and what that could imply for meaningful sustainable development. The briefing will give some historical background, discuss developments in the cannabis market, and highlight environmental and social consequences as well as the recent debate about regulation in Morocco and about European policies.

  2. 7th GIZ/TNI Asian Informal Drug Policy Dialogue

    21 April 2016
    Report

    The 7th GIZ/TNI Asian Informal Drug Policy Dialogue was organised in collaboration with the National Authority for Combating Drugs (NACD) of the Cambodian Government. Key issues on the agenda were recent trends in the drug market in the region and the development of effective policy responses. Specific attention went to the implementation of the UN Guiding Principles on Alternative Development in the Asian context, including in the implementation of alternative development programmes in conflict areas. The involvement of affected communities in policy making and project implementation was another important theme that was discussed. A major aim of the dialogue was to look at the state of the Asian drug policy before UNGASS 2016.

  3. Video: Growers of prohibited plants in Heemskerk

    14 March 2016
    Multi-media

    Producers of prohibited plants face conflict from authorites and the drug market itself. Their communities are stigmatized, criminalized and incarcerated. UN Global drug policy can change this by listening to their demands. Watch our video of the third Global Forum where producers shared experiences and knowledge and ultimately drafted the 'Heemskerk Declaration'

  4. Opium meets Development: Exploring the Opium Question in Contemporary Afghanistan

    • Mariam Morid
    04 February 2016
    Paper

    In light of the April 2016 United Nations General Assembly Special Session (UNGASS), a change of the global order on drug policy should be made. Any outcome of UNGASS  will have essential developmental impacts on Afghanistan’s economy and especially on those involved in the agricultural production side of the opium economy that is farmers and farm-workers.

     

  5. The Land-Drugs Nexus in Myanmar

    Tom Kramer
    06 August 2015
    Multi-media

    Farmers in Myanmar use opium as a cash crop, “because they cannot grow enough food to feed their families for the whole year”.

  6. TNI: Peace process raises hope for more effective and human drug policies

    10 June 2015
    In the media

    Shan Herald Agency for News - The Transnational Institute, has released another report saying the ongoing peace process has raised hope for more effective drug policies.

  7. Thumbnail

    TNI: Peace process raises hope for more effective and human drug policies

    10 June 2015
    In the media

    Shan Herald Agency for News - The Transnational Institute, has released another report saying the ongoing peace process has raised hope for more effective drug policies.

  8. The problem of glyphosate spraying

    Pedro Arenas
    13 April 2015
    Article

    An article published recently in El Espectador commented on the two issues that underpin the Colombian discourse on the subject of drugs. To be precise, the government’s discourse is far from reflecting what goes on in practice, or the actions that are still being carried out in the country. Colombia is seen as the star pupil in complying with the United Nations drug treaties and it continues to do things that many other countries would avoid.

  9. Another UN agency savages the drug war

    George Murkin (Transform Blog)
    16 March 2015
    In the media

    The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), the UN agency charged with developing strategies to reduce global poverty, has strongly criticised current international drug policy, highlighting the disastrous costs it is producing – particularly for the world’s poor. In the agency’s formal submission to the UN General Assembly Special Session (UNGASS) on drugs (PDF), launched at the annual UN Commission on Narcotic Drugs which began last week in Vienna, the UNDP argues:

  10. Conditioning Alternative Development to previous eradication should be abandoned

    Pien Metaal
    12 March 2015
    Other news

    Conditioning Alternative Development (AD) participation to previous eradication should be abandoned as a policy, since it has proved to be counterproductive. As long as the amount of hectares eradicated remains the main indicator for success, sustainable development loses. The voice of the primary stakeholders will be represented in the preparations for UNGASS through the organisation of a Global Forum of Producers of Prohibited Plants. Their participation in the design and implementation of development policies are fundamental.

  11. Myanmar returns to what sells: Heroin

    Thomas Fuller
    03 January 2015
    Article

    A decade ago, Myanmar seemed on course to wipe out the opium fields and heroin jungle labs along its eastern border, the notorious Golden Triangle. Today, valley after valley in these mist-shrouded mountains is covered with resplendent opium poppies, tended by farmers who perch on steep hillsides to harvest the plant’s sticky, intoxicating sap.

  12. gdpo2pb

    Drugs and development: The great disconnect

    • Julia Buxton
    31 December 2014

    This report argues that ‘drugs’ are a development issue and must be recognised as such by development agencies. The cultivation of opium poppy, coca leaf and cannabis for anything other than medical and scientific purposes is prohibited under the UN 1961 Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs, as amended by the 1972 Protocol. However conditions of marginalisation and exclusion have sustained the cultivation of these low capital input/high yield drug crops. Poverty, insecurity and inequality also exacerbate the vulnerability of ‘bridge’ states to trafficking activities. These factors are development concerns requiring economic and political solutions.

  13. Lebanon agriculture minister urges cannabis cultivation for export

    18 December 2014
    Other news

    Agriculture Minister Akram Chehayeb called for the legalization of cannabis farming in Lebanon to allow the state to benefit from the revenue of its export. “We are conducting studies on [how to] organize this type of agriculture so that it becomes monitored by the state, and thus the state can buy the harvest and export it to the countries that need it,” Chehayeb said. He added that the state should end its war on cannabis farmers and find workable alternatives.

  14. Jumblatt renews calls to legalize marijuana

    13 December 2014
    Other news

    Walid Jumblatt has renewed calls to legalize the cultivation and sale of marijuana. The head of the Progressive Socialist Party wrote that the time has come to sanction pot and end the state's prosecution of its sellers. "It is time to allow for the cultivation of marijuana, and to drop the right to issue arrest warrants against people who work in this field," the prominent Druze leader said.

  15. Exploring the Land-Drugs Nexus

    18 October 2014 - Event

    This conference will explore the nexus between land and drugs.

    Download Conference Agenda (PDF, 127KB)

  16. Exploring the Land-Drugs Nexus

    19 October 2014 - Event
  17. Bekaa farmers push against eradicating marijuana growth in Lebanon

    02 June 2014
    Other news

    The growth of cannabis is gradually increasing in the fields in the Bekaa valley. This is mainly due to policies adopted by successive governments that neglected the agricultural sector, while the state has demonstrated a limited capacity to eradicate cannabis crops in the past, and mainly in the last two years. This has encouraged farmers, bearing losses and facing agriculture problems amid a lack of state assistance, protection, support and compensation, to opt for growing marijuana.

  18. Opium cultivation bounces back: TNI report shows dramatic failure of ASEAN’s ‘Drug Free’ strategy

    01 June 2014
    Press release

    Bouncing Back - Relapse in the Golden Triangle, a new in-depth report by the Transnational Institute (TNI) launched in Yangon, Burma/Myanmar, on Monday June 2, highlights the profound changes in the illicit drugs market in the Golden Triangle – Burma, Thailand and Laos – and neighbouring India and China over the past five years.

  19. Bouncing Back

    • Ernestien Jensema, Martin Jelsma, Tom Kramer, Tom Blickman
    01 June 2014
    Report

    TNI's indepth examination of the illegal drug market in the Golden Triangle, which has witnessed a doubling of opium production, growing prison populations and repression of small-scale farmers. This report details the failure of ASEAN's 'drug free' strategy and the need for a new approach.

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