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115 items
  1. Harm reduction

    01 January 2015
    Collection

    Harm reduction is a set of strategies that aim to reduce negative consequences of drug use, by mitigating the potential dangers and health risks. The United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) has significantly expanded its HIV/AIDS programme thanks to support from harm reduction-friendly donor countries, despite ambiguities on the issue within UN drug control agencies. There is a need for up-scaling of basic services for HIV/AIDS prevention and the 'frontline' of heroin prescription and drug consumption rooms.

  2. Human Rights & Drugs

    01 January 2015
    Collection

    Human rights apply to everyone. Drug users, traffickers and growers do not forfeit their human rights, and must be able to enjoy the right to the highest attainable standard of health, as well as to social services, employment, education, freedom from arbitrary detention and so on. The trend has been to toughen drug laws and sentencing guidelines, setting mandatory minimums, disproportionate prison sentences and even death penalties in several countries. Consideration of human rights are becoming essential elements in a growing number of countries’ application of drug legislation.

  3. Sulphur Mining at Kawah Ijen

    Corporate Impunity

    01 January 2015
    Collection
  4. Ethnic Conflict in Myanmar

    01 January 2015
    Collection
  5. Fieldfarming in Amarapura

    Land Policy in Myanmar

    01 January 2015
    Collection
  6. Drug Policy in Myanmar

    01 January 2015
    Collection
  7. Free Trade Agreements (FTAs)

    01 January 2015
    Collection
  8. Food sovereignty

    01 January 2015
    Collection

    A fundamentally contested concept, food sovereignty has — as a political project and campaign, an alternative, a social movement, and an analytical framework — barged into global agrarian discourse over the last two decades. Since then, it has inspired and mobilized diverse publics: workers, scholars and public intellectuals, farmers and peasant movements, NGOs and human rights activists in the North and global South. The term has become a challenging subject for social science research, and has been interpreted and reinterpreted in a variety of ways by various groups and individuals. Indeed, it is a concept that is broadly defined as the right of peoples to democratically control or determine the shape of their food system, and to produce sufficient and healthy food in culturally appropriate and ecologically sustainable ways in and near their territory. As such it spans issues such as food politics, agroecology, land reform, bio-fuels, genetically modified organisms (GMOs), urban gardening, the patenting of life forms, labor migration, the feeding of volatile cities, ecological sustainability, and subsistence rights.

  9. A woman attends her produce post in a market in zone 3, Guatemala City.

    Trade & Investment Alternatives

    01 January 2015
    Collection

    The Alternative Trade Mandate Alliance is an alliance of currently almost 50 organisations, developing an alternative vision of European trade policy that puts people and planet before big business.

  10. Dismantle Corporate Power

    01 January 2015
    Collection

    The initiative to build a global campaign to dismantle corporate power and end TNCs’ impunity came from the network of organizations, movements, campaigns and affected communities that built the campaign process on European TNCs in Latin America together with the Permanent People’s Tribunal (PPT) and the Bi-regional Europe-Latin America and the Caribbean Enlazando Alternativas Network. Since late 2011, organisations from the network together with campaign organisations from different global regions have been promoting the campaign-building process. As of June 2012, over 100 organisations and movements from around the world have signed on to the campaign. For more information go to the website of Dismantle Corporate Power

  11. Binding Treaty TNCs

    01 January 2015
    Collection

    This alliance for a binding treaty on Transnational Corporation (TNC's) gathers global networks and alliances including Dismantle Corporate Power Campaign, FIAN, Friends of the Earth International and Transnational Institute, among others, which collectively represent more than 500 groups world-wide who are determined to stop corporate human rights violations.

  12. Protest Berlin, Trudeau visit  in Berlin 17 Feb 2017

    CETA

    01 January 2015
    Collection

    The Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) is a proposed free trade agreement between Canada and the European Union. The negotiations for CETA concluded on August 1, 2014, but its completion and ratification is expected to take at least two years, due to the number of parties involved. Many sections of the agreement have been severely criticised, in particular its Investor-State Dispute Settlement processes (ISDS) and its likely negative implications for the environment.

  13. Drugs and Peace in Colombia

    01 January 2015
    Collection

    After more than four years of peace talks in Havana, the Colombian government and the FARC have taken important steps toward a definitive agreement to end the conflict. Addressing the issue of drugs – crops for illicit use, production, consumption and drug trafficking– is key to achieving sustainable peace in the country. Violence linked to the drugs economy and the financing of armed groups have been central to the country's conflict, while the illicit drugs market has also served as a survival economy and safety net. Rethinking the war on drugs is therefore critical to building peace throughout the rural regions of Colombia.

  14. This photo is from an investigative report from Rainforest Action Network that presents evidence that Cargill is operating two undisclosed palm oil plantations in West Kalimantan, Indonesia.

    Land and Water Grabbing

    01 January 2015
    Collection

    In recent years, various actors, from big foreign and domestic corporate business and finance to governments, have initiated a large-scale worldwide enclosure of agricultural lands, mostly in the Global South but also elsewhere. This is done for large-scale industrial and industrial agriculture ventures and often packaged as large-scale investment for rural development. But rather than being investment to benefit the majority of rural people, especially the poorest and most vulnerable, this process constitutes a new wave of land and water ‘grabbing’. It is a global phenomenon whereby the access, use and right to land and other closely associated natural resources is being taken over - on a large-scale and/or by large-scale capital – resulting in a cascade of negative impacts on rural livelihoods and ecologies, human rights, and local food security.

  15. Flex crops Topic Image

    Flex crops

    01 January 2015
    Collection

    The convergence of multiple crises (food, energy and fuel, climate and financial) in the midst of the rise of newer hubs of global capital (BRICS countries and some middle income countries) – and the various responses to these by states and corporations – have paved the way for the emergence of ‘flex crops and commodities’. Flex crops and commodities are those that have multiple and/or flexible uses: food, animal feed, fuel, and other commercial-industrial uses. In fact the contemporary global land rush is intertwined with the rise of flex crops and commodities: sites of large-scale land deals tend to be sites of expansion of production of these crops and commodities, e.g. soya, sugarcane, palm oil, corn, cassava, industrial trees. The issues are compelling and urgent, yet still largely under-researched. What are the implications of this phenomenon for how scholars, civil society and grassroots social movements undertake ‘engaged research’, public actions and policy advocacy around agrarian justice issues?

  16. Ngapali Beach

    Ocean Grabbing

    01 January 2015
    Collection

    The term ‘ocean grabbing’ aims to cast new light on important processes and dynamics that are negatively affecting the people and communities whose way of life, cultural identity and livelihoods depend on their involvement in small-scale fishing and closely related activities. We are witnessing a major process of enclosure of the world’s oceans and fisheries resources, including marine, coastal and inland fisheries. Ocean grabbing is occurring mainly through policies, laws, and practices that are (re) defining and (re)allocating access, use and control of fisheries resources away from small-scale fishers and their communities, and often with little concern for the adverse environmental consequences. Ocean grabbing thus means the capturing of control by powerful economic actors of crucial decision-making around fisheries, including the power to decide how and for what purposes marine resources are used, conserved and managed now and in the future. As a result, these powerful actors, whose main concern is making profit, are steadily gaining control of both the fisheries’ resources and the benefits of their use.

  17. Women from Abrono Organic Farming Project (ABOFAP) showcase their seeds near Techiman, Ghana

    Just Investments

    01 January 2015
    Collection

    Not all types of investment are equal in terms of their impact on poverty reduction and development. Through an alarming global tendency, which has governments shaping investment and development policy around the needs of transnational capital, large-scale land deals capturing land and its associated resources are packaged as ‘investments for rural development’. The shift underway in development frameworks is from public sector responsibility for food security towards the private sector as the remedy to hunger and malnutrition, at the expense of the livelihoods, dignity and lifestyle of rural working people, especially poor and marginalised groups. There is a need to ‘reboot’ the debate on agricultural investment, away from the narrow corporate centric perspective, towards investments which best addresses rural poverty and hunger and democratic control of resources – such as public investments and the investments made by small-scale food producers.

  18. Land sovereignty

    01 January 2015
    Collection

    Dramatic changes around food, climate, energy, and finance in recent years have pushed questions of land use and land control back onto the centre stage of development discourse, at the very moment when the same conditions are spurring an unprecedented rush for land and water across the globe. A fusion of the industrial agro-food and energy complexes has made land and water key resources in the global capitalist system again, fuelling in turn a huge renewed process of enclosure known as the ‘global land grab’. There is a need to come to grips with land issues in a changing global context and to rethink what may be needed to mobilise effectively in such a setting. Neither land reform nor land tenure security alone are well-equipped to be frameworks for analysis or action in the current conjuncture. If, as our analysis suggests, there is a need to transition the people’s demand for land from ‘land reform’ and ‘land tenure security’ to something else, then ‘land sovereignty’ as a framework is worth considering.

  19. Shan Market in Pyin Oo Lwin

    Myanmar Commentary

    01 January 2015
    Collection

    Given the exceptional time of change in Myanmar, in the coming months the Transnational Institute will be putting out occasional commentaries, both by TNI and invited individuals, to reflect the challenges of a land in transition. This will be in addition to TNI’s regular Briefing and Report series. These commentaries are intended to contribute broader understanding to the many challenges facing the country and its peoples as a new parliament and government take office in 2016.

    These commentaries are part of a TNI project funded by Sweden. These commentaries are part of a TNI project funded by Sweden. Opinions expressed by authors are not necessarily the views of the donor.

  20. Just Solutions

    01 January 2015
    Collection

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