Articles on War on Iraq before 2007

01 Diciembre 2001
Article

All Alone With the Iraq Dilemma 1 February 2007
By Boris Kagarlitsky
The US will have to find a way out of Iraq by itself, since it has no geopolitical rival or partner to which it can turn to help settle the chaos it has created, writes Kagarlitsky.

The Three US Armies in Iraq 22 January 2007
Zia Mian
The combined US forces in Iraq - the army, private contractors and subcontractors that are subject to neither local law nor US military law - already number over a quarter of a million. Sending a few thousand more troops will not bring strategic changes, says Zia Mian, but will only serve to increase the killing.

Oriente Proximo entre la guerra y la negociacion January 2007
By Mariano Aguirre

Iraqis will never accept this sellout to the oil corporations 16 January 2007
By Kamil Mahdi
The US-controlled Iraqi government is preparing to remove the country's most precious resource from national control

The wages of imperial hubris 13 January 2007
By Praful Bidwai

On the Eve of Bush's "New Direction": Desperately Seeking Victory Institute for Policy Studies, 9 January 2007

U.N. Ambassador's Oily Past TomPaine.com, 8 January 2006

The Flawed Execution of Saddam Hussein 31 December 2006
By Richard Falk

Talking Points on the Execution of Saddam Hussein 31 December 2006
By Phyllis Bennis

Justicia incompleta, sentencia inútil 31 December 2006
By Mariano Aguirre

Architect of Defeat: Rumsfeld and the American Way of War 19 December 2006
By Gabriel Kolko

Can't Stay the Course, Can't End the War, But We'll Call it Bipartisan 7 December 2006
By Phyllis Bennis and Erik Leaver

Comenzar el repliegue: el Informe Baker sobre Iraq 7 December 2006
By Mariano Aguirre

Opciones de guerra y paz 7 Diciembre 2006
By Mariano Aguirre

Run, Rummy, Run 4 December 2006
By Peter Weiss

The Baker-Hamilton Iraq Recommendations: "Stay the Almost Course" 30 November 2006
By Phyllis Bennis

Bush’s policy change: From reckless to prudent imperialism 23 November 2006
By Saul Landau

It's the occupation, stupid 5 May 2006
By Roger Burbach and Paul Cantor

Iraq and Ruin November 2006
Kamil Mahdi interviewed by Oscar Reyes
Iraq has a long history of non-sectarian political movements. But the legacy of war, sanctions and, above all, the continuing occupation have fatally undermined the potential for social and economic stability, while closing down the space for political organising beyond sectarianism and violence. An end to the occupation is needed if economic reconstruction and a more peaceful political process are to emerge, says TNI Fellow Kamil Mahdi.

False alibis 20 November 2006
By John Gittings
In his al-Jazeera interview Tony Blair said his purpose for going to war with Iraq was regime change. Did he forget the original objective?

Time to celebrate 19 November 2006
By Praful Bidwai

Robert M Gates: from cold war to long war 17 November 2006
By Fred Halliday
How will Donald Rumsfeld's successor as United States defence secretary cope with war in Iraq, crisis over Iran, and repositioning the US's global profile? Fred Halliday draws some clues from an interview with the veteran cold warrior.

War Criminals, Beware
By Jeremy Brecher and Brendan Smith
A war crimes case against Donald Rumsfeld and others from the Bush administration is a step towards the principle of universal jurisdiction. The case was filed by the Centre for Constitutional Rights and others on behalf of 12 torture victims.

Background brief on the case against Rumsfeld, Gonzales and others filed in Germany on 14 November 2006

Americans Want a New Direction, but will Democrats Lead? 13 November 2006
By Walden Bello
On 7 November, the American electorate clearly rejected the imperial path, but the question now is now whether the Democrats can provide a different kind of leadership. The US anti-war movement should escalate its efforts and call for an immediate withdrawal from Iraq, writes Bello.

Rumsfeld, el Dios Vulcano 9 November 2006
By Mariano Aguirre
Donald Rumsfeld was convinced that that the US had to be the most powerful nation even if that meant waging illegal wars, violating the Geneva Convention and, internally, weakening Congress. Eventually that cost him his position. It remains to see if the new Secretary of Defense, Robert Gates, will change the course, writes Aguirre.

US Election Verdict Imperils India Nuclear Deal 9 November 2006
By Praful Bidwai
The Democratic Party’s strong showing in US Congressional elections has enlarged the question-mark which hangs over Washington’s nuclear cooperation deal with India, writes Bidwai.

Oportunidad para el cambio , 8 November 2006
By Mariano Aguirre
The US Congressional elections have shown that the Iraq policy of Bush and his team has been defeated. There is now an opportunity to change course, which would benefit US society and its relationship with the world, writes Aguirre.

The Saddam Hussein Death Sentence 6 November 2006
By Richard Falk
The timing of the death sentence imposed on Saddam Hussein, so suspiciously convenient for Republican aspirations in the mid-term elections, will only deepen the sectarian tensions in Iraq, fanning further the flames of civil war.

Iraq: 'The British army is just another militia' October 2006
Interview with Kamil Mahdi
The media tells us only about military resistance in Iraq, but there is also an unarmed resistance which is fighting the occupation with strikes and workplace walkouts. Mahdi tells the inside story.

The Iraq miasma and the Democrats 28 September 2006
By Saul Landau

The Samarra Bombing and its Aftermath: A New Face on the Civil War? 24 February 2006
By Phyllis Bennis and Erik Leaver
Although it remains unclear who was responsible for the attack on the golden-domed Askariya Shia mosque in Samara, it is clear that the presence of US occupation troops in Iraq remains an aggravating provocation to all sides and continues to foment more violence. US and global anti-war forces should respond to the latest escalation of violence with renewed energy in demanding an end to the occupation and all troops being brought home now, urge Bennis and Leaver.

Ending Occupation 11 January 2006
By Phyllis Bennis
Ending the occupation of Iraq requires the complete withdrawal of all US troops, all "coalition" troops, and all mercenaries, plus an end to the privatisation and other outside economic controls imposed on Iraq by the US, World Bank and IMF. Such measures would allow the Iraqi people and those engaged in legitimate resistance against occupation to deal with what remains of their own occupation-fueled "terrorism problem", writes Bennis.

Iraqi Elections: “To Be Free and Fair…” 14 December 2005
By Phyllis Bennis
Whoever wins the December 15 election, the result will likely increase the level of sectarianism in Iraq, wrote Bennis on the eve of the elections. The election results are irrelevant to the US obligation to withdraw its troops and end the occupation, giving up all claims to control over Iraq oil, and ending the occupation-imposed privatization and other laws.

Latino Troops have Parents 1 December 2005
By Saul Landau
It is the poor Latinos that are targeted by the US military recruiters in order to get enough soldiers to be sent to Iraq. But there are growing number of parents that are getting involved in anti-recruiting activities, telling the real story about the war and the US military to young people that might fall victim to the recruiters. Landau tells the story.

Jarhead: From Sparta to Iraq 24 November 2005
Saul Landau
By Landau explores the macho culture that pervades the American mainstream, epitomised in the US Marines. He foresees the Marines' destructive force remaining a model of manhood until the empire disintegrates.

Bush Administration on the Skids in Iraq 17 November 2005
By Phyllis Bennis
Anti-war sentiments are on the rise across the US, now being vocalised even by former war supporters, and reflected in the Senate vote calling on the administration to report to congress on "progress". With the collapse of Bush's last pretext for war - "democratisation" across the Middle East, the emperor's nakedness is ever more exposed, declares Bennis.

Forgeries, Lies and Cover-ups: The Scandal isn't the Leak, But the Illegal War counterpunch, 27 October 2005
Saul Landau
Instead of following the bigger story, that the White House had conspired to lead the country into an unjust war, the US media focused instead on the leak of a CIA official's name. This crime pales in comparison with conspiring to lead the nation to war under false pretences, writes Landau

IPS Statement on 2000 U.S. soldiers killed in Iraq
25 October 2005
Phyllis Bennis, Erik Leaver and the IPS Iraq Task Force
Ending the US occupation of Iraq is the only solution to the war. The only way left to honour the deaths of the fallen on all sides is to ensure that no more follow in their footsteps.

Politics of a Prize 23 October 2005
By Praful Bidwai
There is something dubious in awarding the Nobel Peace prize to International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and its Director-General Mohamed El Baradei, says Bidwai, especially when the Agency's Board of Governors is trying to corner Iran. True that he didn't capitulate to US pressure on Iraq, but one can't say that he has promoted nuclear disarmament.

Bush: An Assessment Progreso Weekly, 20 october 2005
By Saul Landau
With his criminal policy in Iraq, and mismanagement of the hurricane disasters, Bush's popularity continues to fall. Now, when even his media manipulator Karl Rove is deep in corruption, Bush will find it increasingly difficult to keep his public image, writes Landau.

The Iraqi Constitution: A Referendum for Disaster 13 October 2005
By Phyllis Bennis
The constitutional process culminating in Saturday's referendum is not a sign of Iraqi sovereignty and democracy taking hold, but rather a consolidation of US influence and control likely to make the current situation worse, wrote Bennis on the eve of the referendum.

UN Nuclear Watchdog ELBaradei Wins Nobel Peace Prize Months After U.S. Tries To Force Him From Job as Head of IAEA Phylis Bennis takes part in a debate at Democracy Now!, 7 October 2005

The Iraq Quagmire: The Mounting Costs of War and the Case for Bringing Home the Troops Phyllis Bennis, Erik Leaverand the IPS Iraq Task Force, Institute for Policy Studies, 31 August 2005

Bush Sends John Bolton to the United Nations 3 August 2005
By Phyllis Bennis
Relying on an emergency constitutional provision President Bush appointed John Bolton the new US ambassador to the UN. He is unequivocally committed to the Bush administration's long-standing policy of unilateralism. But following his reputation of a bully, few at UN headquarters are likely to take his "persuasions" seriously. As a result, this may turn out to be an opportunity for international social movements and allied governments to advance campaign to reclaim the United Nations.

The War and Peace Equation Today: Global Trends Threaten Local Initiatives 24 July 2005
By Walden Bello
Negative developments at the global level are leading towards greater destabilisation and greater human insecurity. GPPAC should relate to the global peace and justice movements if it is to contribute effectively to the making of a truly more secure world, says Bello. He also calls on global civil society to join in a strategic alliance with Southern governments in the UN reform debate.

Remembrance from the other London 12 July 2005
By Hilary Wainwright
The widespread view among London citizens is that the attacks that shook the city were linked to the war against Iraq, but the political elite is in denial, writes Wainwright. Activists are making that link, as well as a strong stress on the defence of Muslim communities and civil liberties, but that view has still to find political representation.

Tipping Point Iraq
By Phyllis Bennis
Anti-war organizing is finally paying off, writes Bennis, with a large majority of people in the US now supporting anti-war positions, and especially the demand to bring home the troops, with an echo in the Congress. Our new challenge is to grab the openings made possible by the shifts in public and official opinions, to reach out broadly to build stronger alliances and expand our movement.


Logo WTI

World Tribunal on Iraq
23-27 June 2005

The Role of the "Coalition of the Willing" in the Violation of International Law and Universal Human Rights
By Walden Bello
Testimony delivered at the World Tribunal on Iraq, Istanbul, 24 June 2005
In his speech, Bello outlined specific charges against the "Coalition of the Willing" assembled by the US government to support its aggression in Iraq. The responsibility of the Coalition for the invasion, occupation and destruction of Iraq is that of a willing accomplice, said Bello. All 50 countries that make up this front stand collectively condemned for providing legitimacy for a fundamental violation of international law: the invasion of a sovereign country. Although the degree of the guilt varies, the UK bearing the brunt of responsibility, all governments participating in this formation must be held accountable and arraigned before the appropriate international legal bodies for prosecution, conviction, sentencing and assessment of reparations to the Iraqi people.

The role of the media
By Saul Landau
Testimony delivered at the World Tribunal on Iraq, Istanbul, 24 June 2005
In his speech at the Tribunal, Landau accused the US corporate media of diverting the attention of citizens and distorting the reasons for the war. As fewer multinational giants grabbed control of the media over the last decades, media priorities have shifted accordingly, turning readers and viewers away from concerns of politics and towards shopping. As the US government works actively for the corporate media in international fora like the WTO to "deregulate" media, cut corporate taxes and open media markets elsewhere, the media act not as a protector of the citizenry, but as validator of the ruling authority.

Statements of the Jury

Commentary by John Pilger

The Perfect Storm: The World Tribunal 28 June 2005
By Walden Bello
The World Tribunal on Iraq was a striking display of how global civil society is supplanting governments and the corporate media as the source of truth, justice and direction as the latter institutions get universally discredited, writes Bello.

Mission Accomplished. Iraq is Broken 7 July 2005
By Saul Landau
It is hard to believe that US democrats call for "staying the course" in Iraq. Don't they understand that American soldiers break, not fix? Testimonies at the World Tribunal on Iraq showed the extent of damage caused by the war and occupation of Iraq. Hundreds of thousands of Iraqis killed, countless tortured, country ruined by the fire power of the US army and economy disintegrated and privatized by US corporations.

Website World Tribunal on Iraq


Exporting Democracy, Revising Torture: The Complex Missions of Michael Ignatieff 15 July 2005
By Mariano Aguirre
Analysing Michael Ignatieff's patriotic article that claims that with occupation of Iraq and the war against terrorism, the US is promoting the "Jeffersonian dream" of promoting democracy, Aguirre shows that the government that went to war in defiance of the UN Security Council, actively promotes the failure of the UN, refuses to sign international treaties, opts out of international justice and ignores human rights in prisons is a government that is violating rather than promoting the Jeffersonian dream.

Mission Accomplished. Iraq is Broken 7 July 2005
By Saul Landau
It is hard to believe that US democrats call for "staying the course" in Iraq. Don't they understand that American soldiers break, not fix? Testimonies at the World Tribunal on Iraq showed the extent of damage caused by the war and occupation of Iraq. Hundreds of thousands of Iraqis killed, countless tortured, country ruined by the fire power of the US army and economy disintegrated and privatized by US corporations.

Tipping Point Iraq 27 June 2005
By Phyllis Bennis
Anti-war organizing is finally paying off, writes Bennis, with a large majority of people in the US now supporting anti-war positions, and especially the demand to bring home the troops, with an echo in the Congress. Our new challenge is to grab the openings made possible by the shifts in public and official opinions, to reach out broadly to build stronger alliances and expand our movement.

Bush distorts history while Laura amuses the media Progreso Weekly, 19 May 2005
By Saul Landau

Iraq, the US, and the Challenges to the Global Peace Movement 18 March 2005
By Walden Bello
Speaking in Vancouver, at an event organized as a part of the global Protest against the War in Iraq, Bello calls for militant solidarity among world's peoples and continuing global resistance to the Bush agenda of global domination

Democracy and Ocupation: What's Really on the Rise Across the Middle East? 12 March 2005
By Phyllis Bennis
Contrasting US's claims to be supporting democratic changes in the Middle East with actual US policies towards the countries in the region, Bennis concludes that what is happening across the Middle East is an explosion not of democracy, but of occupation.

The "Noble Liars" Attack Syria 3 March 2005
By Saul Landau and Farah Hassen
The same group that offered a "noble lie" to sell to the public the need to invade and occupy Iraq, is now applying the methodology to the new project to build support for an attack on Syria, warn Landau and Hassen. The recent assassination of former Lebanese Prime Minister Rafik Hariri, offers the neo-cons a new excuse.

Desperate Martians Now Wooing Venusians 2 March 2005
By Walden Bello
Bush's tour of Europe is part of a diplomatic offensive to convince Europeans "to put Iraq behind them", and to persuade the world that with the recent elections in Iraq, there is a new game that must be played, and its name is democracy, argues Bello. During his anti-war tour of Italy last month, Bello observed that knocking Britain and Italy out of the war against the people of Iraq is the top priority on the agenda of the European anti-war movement for the coming months.

The Iraq Elections: No Democratic Breakthrough 22 February 2005
By Achin Vanaik
The US is colonial occupying power out to maintain its control over Iraq, and to see in the recent elections some kind of democratic breakthrough is just self-delusion, writes Vanaik.

Free Choice under Coercion? Frontline, 12 February 2005
By Praful Bidwai
The elections in Iraq do not amount to its democratisation and the expression of the sovereign will of its people, writes Bidwai. The US has created a structure in which it will be the prosecutor, judge and jury, and where all the dice are loaded in its favour.

A Threatened UN in King George’s Court 3 February 2005
Saul Landau

The orchestrated departure of Peter Hansen, Commissioner-General of the UN's Relief and Works Agency for Palestinian refugees (UNRWA), shows both the weakness of Kofi Annan and the overwhelming will and strength of the United States and Israel in determining the course of the UN, writes Landau.

Reading the Elections 1 February 2005
Phyllis Bennis
This election held under military occupation and not meeting international criteria remains illegitimate, just as the invasion and occupation of Iraq is - democracy cannot be imposed at the point of a gun, writes Phyllis Bennis.

Elections won't solve Civil War in Iraq 27 January 2005
Saul Landau
After the January electoral travesty, the resistance will continue to disrupt oil flow and assassinate the newly elected government leaders, predicts Landau. Either Bush will have to continue to commit US troops in an effort to hold together the fictitious Iraq he has invented, or he will have to allow the people of Iraq to determine their own destiny.

The Inauguration Speech: Consolidating the Empire 20 January 2005
By Phyllis Bennis
Bush's second inaugural speech was designed to signal to the US and to the rest of the world that the drive towards empire that shaped his first four years will be consolidated and strengthened in his second term, writes Bennis.

Ending the US War in Iraq: How to Bring the Troops Home and Internationalize the Peace 12 January 2005
By Phyllis Bennis and Erik Leaver
The continuing presence of the US troops has strengthened rather than weakened the Iraqi resistance, which has grown larger, stronger and more popular in the last two years, argue Bennis and Leaver. The target of almost all the attacks remain institutions and individuals associated with US occupation forces. The authors argue that with the withdrawal of those forces, thus bringing an end to the Iraqi structures supporting them, the major target for resistance attacks will disappear. Ending the US occupation of Iraq is the only solution to the escalating crisis. Bennis and Leaver go on to chart a plan for US withdrawal, and outline the responsibilities the US has towards Iraqi people.

The U.S. Peace & Justice Movement Facing 2005 7 January 2005
By Phyllis Bennis
Bennis maps a strategy for the US Peace & Justice Movement, arguing the need to identify deficits in US war policy, especially the fissures within sectors of support for the war, and to widen those fissures into large gaps.

Iraq's Elections Institute for Policy Studies, 20 December 2004
By Phyllis Bennis
Legitimate elections are not at all feasible in the current violence-torn Iraq, holds Bennis. Furthermore, she argues, the elections are designed to provide a veneer of credibility and legitimacy for the continuation of US control of Iraq through the election of a US-friendly government. To give Iraqis a real choice would be to arrange the kind of referendum the UN ran in East Timor, in which Iraqis would vote on whether foreign troops should be withdrawn.

US Right-Wing Ratchets up Attacks on the UN; UN Panel calls for Wide-ranging Reforms, still fudges on Preemptive War Instute for Policy Studies, 9 December 2004
By Phyllis Bennis
The escalating attacks on UN Secretary General Kofi Annan, including calls for his resignation, are not responses to any "scandal", writes Bennis. Rather, they must be seen as major attacks on the United Nations as a whole. They reflect, among other things, a growing view among many in Washington that Iraq was a step too far in the UN challenging US legitimacy and credibility.

Progressives Bounce Back as Liberals Continue to Unravel in the US 29 November 2004
By Walden Bello
In the wake of Bush's victory, Liberal democrats are scrambling to recast themselves as a loyal opposition. The enterprise comes across as desperate, unprincipled, and confused, comments Bello. Liberals have long ceased to provide a viable vision and moral compass for US foreign policy. Progressives must aggressively fill this role, and a firm stand on the demand for the unconditional withdrawal of troops from Iraq is the place to start, he argues.

Falluja, the 21st Century Guernica. Where's Picasso? Progreso Weekly, 25 November 2004
Saul Landau
Falluja should serve as the symbol of the war of atrocity against the Iraqi people, as the fascist bombing of Guernica did during the Spanish civil war. To get through media propaganda, we need a new Picasso, writes Landau.

America underneath New York Open democracy, 18 November 2004
By Mariano Aguirre
Observing the New York subway as an example of exclusion, Aguirre sees the city as a mirror of the growing inequality throughout the US, with the role of the state as main provider of social security, education and health declining.

Post-Election Disasters Rage Across Washington and the Middle East 18 November 2004
By Phyllis Bennis
Bush's re-election will have many negative consequences, writes Bennis. The disastrous policy in Iraq will continue, what Falluja clearly shows; US policy towards the Israeli occupation will not shift, and the Palestinian elections scheduled for 9 January will be illegitimate unless Israel withdraws troops from the occupied territories. Moves to marginalise the UN are likely to continue - the replacement of Colin Powell with hard liner Condolezza Rice is a clear sign of the administration's unilateral approach.

Bush’s Triumph: three Ends and a Beginning 17 November 2004
By Fred Halliday
November 2004 represents a decisive moment in global as well as American politics that demands an urgent response from concerned citizens everywhere, writes Fred Halliday.

The Appeal of George W. Bush: A Mystery for the World to Solve Progreso Weekly, 12 November 2004
By Saul Landau
Almost 60 million Americans voted for Bush although he had led the country into an unjustified war, screwed up the economy, destroyed as much of the nature as he could and maintained loyalty to a Vice President whose former company seemed to be stealing outrageously from the Pentagon. For tens of millions, the gut has replaced the head as the body part that directs voting, concludes Landau.

The Republican Right's Challenge to the Global Anti-War Movement 8 November 2004
By Walden Bello
After the elections, the future of democracy, economic rights, individual rights, and minority rights seems bleak in the US, but America's rightward march fails to drag the rest of the world along with it, writes Bello. The success of the American right domestically cannot halt the unravelling of Washington's hegemony globally, and Iraq is the main source of this unraveling. Supporting the Iraqi people's struggle to create the sovereign space necessary for the election of a national government of their choice continues to be one of the two overriding priorities of the global anti-war movement, he asserts. The other is to end the Israeli occupation of Palestine.

A Post Election Rant 5 November 2004
By Saul Landau
The US election campaign was bursting with religious terms, calling on faith and values. It negated the notion of democracy that we all learned in schools, cries Landau, where political opponents would carefully explain their positions and an informed electorate would decide.

Under Bush II, South Asia Could Be Worse Off 5 November 2004
By Praful Bidwai
Bidwai analyses the impact the new Bush administration will have on South Asia. He sees the impact being transmitted through "external" factors such as changes to the international order, through the weakening of multilateral institutions and the aggravation of the Middle East crisis, and through how Washington chooses to relate to individual countries.

On the Eve of the Elections 31 October 2004
By Phyllis Bennis
Writing on the eve of the elections, Bennis tots up the human and financial costs of the war on Iraq, adding that whoever wins the elections, the movement must continue to mobilise and build an independent movement for an end to war and occupation in Iraq, an end to occupation in Palestine, and a US accountable to international law and not the law of empire.

Imperial Hypocrisy 21 October 2004
By Saul Landau
Justifying invasions with patriotic slogans is commonplace in US diplomacy. Has it become a job requirement in the State for spokespeople to learn the most sophisticated forms of hypocrisy, asks Landau.

Debates, Duelfer, & Aluminium Tubes 7 October 2004
By Phyllis Bennis
The Duelfer Report shows Iraq had no WMD and the war was based on lies. But even if the weapons existed, the war would still have been illegal. A broad and powerful peace movement can keep reminding the US about that, as those who invoke international law must themselves submit to it.

Facts - Lies; Slogans - Truth 7 October 2004
By Saul Landau
When reporting about the situation in occupied Iraq, the mainstream US media routinely repeats lies generated by the White House, writes Landau, who makes a sarcastic suggestion to provoke the public into at least discussing what the mainstream media hasn't told the public about Bush's vanity wars.

The Pinochet Cases and the Invasion of Iraq 30 September 2004
By Saul Landau
Landau charts the history of legal proceedings against Augusto Pinochet, the former Chilean dictator, and draws parallels with the invasion of Iraq. The Pinochet cases question the right of heads of state to commit criminal acts in the name of "needs of state". The war on Iraq too, he argues, was a criminal act justified on the same base. Landau takes issue with Bush's subjective interpretation of US national security as nullifying law. What a juicy issue for US voters! Unfortunately, he adds, Kerry has not exactly made the issue crystal clear.

Beirut 2004: A Milestone in the Global Struggle against Injustice and War Beirut International Assembly of Anti-war and Anti-Globalisation Movements, 17 September 2004
By Walden Bello
In his opening speech to the Beirut International Assembly of Anti- war and Anti-Globalisation Movements, Bello charts the history of the global justice movement in the last decade and in reference to the occupation of Iraq, identifies the movement's only principle stand as being the immediate and unconditional withdrawal of US and coalition forces. Bello declared the one front of the struggle as being that against imperialism and war, and the other as the struggle to change the rules of the global economy, for it is the logic of global capitalism that is the source of the disruption of society and of the environment.

The Crisis of Universalism: America and Radical Islam after 9/11 16 September 2004
By Fred Halliday
In a trenchant analysis of the post-9/11 world, Fred Halliday documents the two-sided assault both by the United States and its fundamentalist enemies on universal principles. Can citizens of the world retrieve a confident, humane politics from beneath the rubble?

Failing the Mission? Form a Commission 12 August 2004
By Saul Landau and Farrah Hassen
Without addressing the issues that have generated anti- Americanism throughout the world: empire and its refusal to redistribute imperially obtained wealth, the 9/11 commission can't do much, laments Landau

What's Islamic about it? 5 August 2004
By Praful Bidwai
The proposal of creating an "Islamic peace-keeping force" to be dispatched to Iraq, apart from the fact that it seems all-American, has two other things wrong with it, writes Bidwai. First, there can be no legitimate role in Iraq's current situation for a "peace-keeping force". Second, founding such an intervention on the premise of an "Islamic" identity makes no sense.

The Roller Coaster of Relevance: The Security Council, Europe and the U.S. War in Iraq 29 July 2004
By Phyllis Bennis
In this excellent piece, Phyllis Bennis proposes that governments willing to stand up to the US join forces with the "second super power" (mobilised global civil society) to reclaim the central role of the United Nations and international law as the centre pieces of peaceful relations among nations. Key to this, she argues, would be the potential role of leading European governments in creating an empowered Security Council capable of recasting global power away from reliance on nuclear arsenals and corporate treasuries.

Entry from a White House Diary? 22 July 2004
By Saul Landau

Phyllis Bennis Paying the Price: The Mounting Costs of the Iraq War [PDF document]

A Study by the Institute for Policy Studies and Foreign Policy In Focus, 24 June 2004

The Bush administration has declared that on 30 June 2004 the United States will "transfer sovereignty" to Iraq. Americans are being told that this is a great victory for democracy. And yet, after 15 months of war and occupation in Iraq, and even with public support for the war plummeting, there is still little understanding in the United States about the real costs of the war, concludes the report.

Key Findings

Updated Numbers - 20 July 2004

Paying the Price. The Mounting Costs of the Iraq War - updated numbers 20 July 2004
By Phyllis Bennis
A Study by the Institute for Policy Studies and Foreign Policy In Focus
The Bush administration has declared that on 30 June 2004 the United States will "transfer sovereignty" to Iraq. Americans are being told that this is a great victory for democracy. And yet, after 15 months of war and occupation in Iraq, and even with public support for the war plummeting, there is still little understanding in the United States about the real costs of the war, concludes the report.

The "Coalition" Unravells, "Saddam Hussein Lite" takes Command (with Michael Sochynsky), Institute for Policy Studies, 19 July 2004
By Phyllis Bennis
The Bush administration's only remaining justification for the war on Iraq, that of bringing democracy, has been dealt another blow, this time by the interim Iraqi Prime Minister Allawi, as he made clear that democracy is not on his agenda, reports Bennis.

Counting the Costs 13 July 2004
By Phyllis Bennis and Karen Dolan
In May 2004 polls conducted by US occupation authorities, 55 percent of Iraqis said they would feel safer if all US occupying troops left their country. "We should listen to the people of Iraq, in whose name the Bush administration launched this war".

The Price of Imperial Folly 15 July 2004
By Phyllis Bennis
The Iraq war has failed to accomplish its stated purposes: Iraq is neither sovereign nor free; the Middle East is no more democratic; Americans are not safer, nor is the world. Bennis argues that far too high a price has been paid for this spectacular failure, and a refusal to change course will merely compound this colossally expensive folly of empire.

Transfer of Power, Sort of – Now and Then Progreso Weekly, 8 July 2004
By Saul Landau
Commenting on the so-called transfer of power to the Iraqis, Landau charts the history of the US foreign interventions. The US preaches principles of law, which are dispensed with once they don't suit the US interests anymore, and new principles are introduced: invade and occupy a country and then create the façade of a power transfer to an "appointocracy" and call it democratic government.

Left Behind. The False "Hand-overs" of Iraq & Saddam Hussein Institute for Policy Studies, 5 July 2004
By Phyllis Bennis
What happened in Iraq is not a hand-over of sovereignty to Iraqis, but hand-over from Paul Bremer's "Coalition Provisional Authority" to a new US "embassy"-led by Ambassador John Negroponte, says Bennis.

The Final UN Resolution on Iraq's Interim Government Institute for Policy Studies, 10 June 2004
By Phyllis Bennis
Commenting on the UN Security Council resolution 1546 Bennis says it is designed to provide international legitimacy for the continuation of the US occupation and control of Iraq, and adds that if global civil society is to be able to reclaim the UN as part of global mobilisation against war and occupation, challenging the legitimacy of the Council resolution will be a necessary step.

Iraq's Interim Government and the UN Resolution 4 June 2004
By Phyllis Bennis
Iraq remains an occupied country. Whether the new "interim government" stands or falls, whether or not the United Nations passes a new resolution, whether or not the Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani's hints constitute real approval of the "government," the occupation remains, says Bennis. Neither the existence of the interim government nor the likely new Security Council resolution change the reality of 138,000 US occupying the country and US economic and political forces maintaining control of Iraq's economic and political life.

Abu Ghraib Shows Moral Degradation 27 May 2004
By Boris Kagarlitsky
The scandal over the abuse of Iraqi prisoners brought to light the moral degradation of American soldiers and, with the indications that the top military ranks knew about it, opened a possible rift in the administration, writes Kagarlitsky.

Bush Five Steps in a Speech: Five Steps to Lose a War and the United Nations Resolution on the Table 24 May 2004
By Phyllis Bennis
Commenting on Bush's "five step plan" to "help Iraq achieve democracy and freedom", Bennis says it is a recipe for continuing US occupation, continuing deaths of hundreds of US and coalition troops and thousands of Iraqis, and continuing destruction of Iraq. At the same time, the draft US-UK resolution submitted to the United Nations is designed to legitimize continuing US control of the occupation while giving the illusion of international support - "bluewashing" the Iraq war with a UN endorsement.

Iraq in Imperial Perspective 27 May 2004
By Saul Landau
American leaders traditionally denied America's imperial inclinations, until neo-cons penetrated the highest levels of Bush administration and argued that the future of democracy and America's world position rested in establishing full spectral dominance. However, the retreat of American empire, begun at Fallujah, is underway, argues Landau.

With the US Army on Trial, Can "Fragging" be far Behind? 18 May 2004
By Walden Bello
With the resistance they are facing in Iraq, the seeds of discord have been sown within the American administration. The military had been much more cautious than the neo-conservative "chicken hawks" in White House about the invasion of Iraq. What Colin Powell and his generation of Vietnam-era junior officers have tried hard to avoid - the unravelling of the morale of the US Army a second time - is upon them, says Bello.

Iraq: Torture is no Aberration 18 May 2004
By Praful Bidwai
The torture of Iraqi prisoners was not an exception. It is inseparable from the larger context set by the post-September 11 consensus in the Bush administration that old rules cannot apply to "the war against terrorism", Bidwai asserts. In the face of the revelations, the US is now desperate for a "face-saver" through the UN and a "transfer of power". Bidwai argues there can be no sovereignty, however, until the occupation ends.

Torture Reflects Failure of Bush's Iraq Policy 17 May 2004
By Phylis Bennis
The Abu Ghraib torture scandal is symptomatic of the overall failure of the Bush Administration's Iraq war policy, writes Bennis. There is no way to "get past" the current crisis; the only solution is to withdraw US troops from Iraq.

Torture: The Logical Outcome of Bush’s War for Democracy? Progreso Weekly, 13 May 2004
By Saul Landau
The abuse of Iraqi prisoners was not an "isolated incident", it was a logical consequence that followed from the war itself, especially a war based on false premises, says Landau.

Admit you were wrong and help the UN 13 May 2004
Phyllis Bennis

Sexual Abuse, Lies, and Videotape Sink America’s Iraq Expedition 10 May 2004
By Walden Bello
Photos of the torture of Iraqi prisoners have triggered the collapse of any legitimacy for the occupation. With the increasing opposition to the occupation in the US, Bush's administration is desperate for an exit strategy, writes Bello.

The Illegality of the War 8 May 2004
presentation at the New York Session of the World Tribunal on Iraq, Copper Union, New York,
By Peter Weiss

The Torture Photographs Institute for Policy Studies, 5 May 2004
By Phyllis Bennis
The humiliation, torture and brutalization of Iraqi prisoners by US troops, intelligence officials and private military contractors is not an aberration, writes Bennis. Rather, it reflects the racist demonization of Iraqis that has been at the heart of US Iraq policy since 1990.

Iraq May Save Bush's Skin The Moscow Times, 29 April 2004
By Boris Kagarlitsky
John Kerry doesn't differ significantly from Bush concerning the occupation of Iraq and thus he will not be able to counter the president on this issue. This means that Kerry will not attract antiwar votes, while Bush will attract war supporters in spite of all the damage the US policy is causing in Iraq. Paradoxically, concludes Kagarlitsky, the war might save Bush.

Elections & irresponsible imperialists – is there another kind? 29 April 2004
By Saul Landau
Commenting on the two prospective candidates for the US presidential elections this year, Bush and Kerry, Landau says American voters will have no choice on policies towards Iraq or Israel, as the candidates agree on "security issues".

Israeli Nuclear Whistle-blower to be Released Today 21 April 2004
By Praful Bidwai
Mordechai Vanunu leaked secrets about Israeli nuclear arms, and for that was kept in prison for 18 years. His contribution to raising awareness about the nuclear danger is both substantial and ineradicable, writes Bidwai.

Falluja and the Forging of the New Iraq 18 April 2004
By Walden Bello
A defiant slogan repeated by residents of Falluja over the last year was that their city would be "the graveyard of the Americans." The last two weeks has seen that chant become a reality, with most of the 88 US combat deaths falling in the intense fighting around Falluja. But there is a bigger sense in which the slogan is true: Falluja has become the graveyard of US policy in Iraq.

The Empire in Denial and the Denial of Empire 15 April 2004
By Saul Landau
The US was where revolution received its first justification, but became the bastion of counter-revolution and expanding empire. Landau talks here about, amongst other matters, the blunders of Iraq and how Bush's "war on terrorism" has produced more terrorism.

Iraq - President Bush on the Defensive & UN Plans for Creating Interim Authority 14 April 2004
By Phyllis Bennis
The continuation of US military occupation, whatever nominal shift takes place ceremonially on 30 June, renders the entire interim arrangement illegitimate, writes Bennis.

The Vulnerabilities of the Bush Iraq Policies 11 April 2004
By Phyllis Bennis
The US drive towards empire faces new and serious challenges, writes Bennis, the most important being the widening military confrontation now facing US troops in cities across Iraq. But there is a further challenge internationally. The "second super-power" is on the rise, and it now has broadened to include a new assortment of governments prepared to defy US pressures, inter-governmental organizations and groups, and new developments may point to a potential to reclaim the United Nations itself as part of the global resistance to US war.

How Iraq has Worsened Washington’s Strategic Dilemma 2 April 2004
By Walden Bello
After more than a year since the invasion of Iraq, the US is not the same cocksure superpower of yesterday, says Bello. The Iraq quagmire is just one manifestation of that fatal disease of empires: over-extension.

Report from a Rainbow-Covered Rome 21 March 2004
By Phyllis Bennis
Bennis reports from the 20 March demonstration calling for an end to the occupation of Iraq

Lessons from Spain 18 March 2004
By Praful Bidwai
Three big factors underlie the momentous change that has occurred in Spain, writes Bidwai: the powerful sentiment against the war and occupation of Iraq, anger against the Aznar government for lying about the identity of the agency behind the March 11 attacks, and growing popular sympathy for the cause of regional autonomy and decentralisation of power.

An Irresponsible Accountability Act 18 March 2004
By Saul Landau and Farrah Hassen
By signing the Syria Accountability Act, which empowers the US president to place economic and diplomatic sanctions on Syria as punishment for its policies of "harbouring terrorists", "developing WMD", and occupying Lebanon", Bush has made Syria a pariah nation, and helped to realize goal of current Israeli policy: to secure US help in weakening its unfriendly neighbours.

A Few Thoughts on the Events in Spain Institute for Policy Studies, 16 March 2004
By Phyllis Bennis
Condemning the terrorist attacks in Spain, Bennis welcomes the new Spanish government to the forces opposed to the war in Iraq.

The Iraqi Constitution 16 March 2004
By Phyllis Bennis
With the signing of the interim Iraqi "constitution", the US as occupying power is hoping that its planned June 30th "transfer of power" will be accepted globally as the "restoration of sovereignty to Iraq." In fact, that "transfer of power" will not end the US occupation, will not lead to the withdrawal of US troops, and will not result in any real sovereignty for Iraq. The constitution itself implies recognition of its impotence, as it recognizes that all "laws, regulations, orders, and directives" issued by the US occupation authorities will remain in force.

The US Begs for UN Backing in Iraq Institute for Policy Studies, 29 January 2004
By Phyllis Bennis
Washington’s sudden love affair with UN is a result of a quagmire the US has found itself in and the need to have some political cover for the occupation, says Bennis. The 30 June deadline for the elections in Iraq is driven more by US desperation than by any concern about "returning sovereignity" to Iraq.

State of the Union 2004 21 January 2004
By Phyllis Bennis
Analysing Bush’s state of the union speech, Bennis notes that it was driven by electoral concerns and reflected a far-right agenda designed to appeal to the wealthy and social conservatives.

Fog of War – Vietnam and Iraq Progreso Weekly, 15 January 2004
By Saul Landau
Before choosing war in Iraq, the Bush leadership might profitably have consulted former Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara for some lessons from the past, says Landau.

Looking back on Saddam Hussein 9 January 2004
By Fred Halliday
TNI Advisor, Fred Halliday reminisces about what it was like to study the Arab world under the shadow of Saddam Hussein.

Iraq At the End of the Year 1 January 2004
By Saul Landau
In this informed overview of the history of foreign intervention in Iraq, going back to the collapse of the Ottoman Empire almost a century ago, Landau gives context to the more recent war and subsequent occupation of Iraq.

Judge Saddam Fairly 24 December 2003
By Praful Bidwai
The conditions in which Saddam was "discovered" suggest he was a prisoner, with no means of communication, and incapable of directing the resistance against the occupiers. Bidwai notes that his capture is unlikely to hinder the Iraqi resistance.

Iraq December 2003
By Jochen Hippler
On returning from a TNI-sponsored field trip to Iraq in September, Hippler reports that overthrowing Saddam’s regime was the easy part, but that the main battle is over controlling and reshaping Iraq. While most of the Iraqi population are happy with Saddam’s downfall, few believe that Washington waged war against Saddam because it wanted to "liberate" the country, pointing rather to the US’ strategic and economic self-interest. The general sentiment in Iraq towards the US is still ambivalent, with considerable differences within and between different sections of the population.

Bully Goes to War – Blames God 12 December 2003
By Saul Landau
George W. Bush has made bullying into official US policy, argues Landau. As president, Bush has the forum to conjure up threats, report them as certainties and then order the armed forces to fight them.

American Corporations Only, Please! 10 December 2003
By Phyllis Bennis

There for the Long Term: The US is Seeking the Cultural Commitment of Elites in West Asia 4 December 2003
By Achin Vanaik
The invasion of Iraq must be seen for what it is – not just the attempt to impose direct US control on that country but as the first major act in a wider effort to reorganize the US’s regional domination on more consensual lines, as hegemony in the longer run cannot rest on force alone.

Öl ins Feuer: Amerikas Anti- Terror-Politik ist keine Lösung 26 November 2003
By Jochen Hippler

Bush on Middle East "Democracy" & "Ending Occupation" in Iraq 18 November 2003
By Phyllis Bennis
Bush's November 6 speech on democracy in the Middle East served the purpose to divert public attention from the lies regarding weapons of mass destruction. The timetable for turning some authority over to Iraqis was aimed to assure Americans the US will not be stuck in Iraq. Both statements were issued with a view to the American elections in 2004.

Words of War from Warmongers 13 November 2003
By Saul Landau
Bush administration's distortion of facts in the post-war period, to justify their failed and illegal policies in Iraq, equals the pre-war manufacturing the reasons for the war

Triumph of Cynicism 8 November 2003
By Praful Bidwai
America's plans in Iraq have come a cropper; its soldiers' casualties under occupation exceed the number killed during the war; yet, Washington pursues its cynical plans - regrettably, without much resistance from other major powers.

The Madrid Donors Conference: A Fig Leaf for Maintaining US Control 22 October 2003
By Phyllis Bennis
The international donors meeting in Madrid, initially called to pressure other governments to contribute money to sustain the US-UK occupation of Iraq, will not come close to meeting Washington's original goals.

UN Security Council Vote on US Occupation Institute for Policy Studies, 16 October 2003
By Phyllis Bennis
The new US-driven UN Security Council resolution on Iraq provides only an internationalist fig-leaf for Washington's occupation. It does not set a timeframe for turning Iraqi sovereignty back to Iraq, and does not foresee any significant role for the United Nations.

Who got us into this mess, and why? Progreso Weekly, 2 October 2003
By Saul Landau
As Bush has asked for $87 billion more to "deal with Iraq and Afghanistan", the liberal elite in the US seems to have gathered enough energy to expose the lies in Bush and company's Iraq story.

Iraq, the UN, & US Corporations 2 October 2003
By Phyllis Bennis
We should oppose any new UN resolution aimed at providing more legitimacy for the US-UK occupation of Iraq.

Back to the UN! 21 September 2003
By Phyllis Bennis
Washington wants a UN-endorsed multilateral military force to participate in the occupation of Iraq, but the commander would be an American and would not share authority and decision-making with the UN nor with governments sending soldiers.

Keeping out of America's Mess 30 August 2003
By Praful Bidwai
The US has panicked over the situation in Iraq and went to the UN Security Council to push for a new resolution requesting more troops for Iraq. India shouldn't send its troop to get the US out of mud.

Is the US Considering a Return to the UN? 29 August 2003
By Phyllis Bennis
The US is drafting a resolution for creation of an UN-endorsed multilateral military force to join US occupation force in Iraq. The emerging reassessment is not a reflection of any concern regarding the illegality of the occupation, or impact on Iraqis, but of high cost of the occupation - both in US soldiers and dollars. Moreover, a new UN resolution would provide political cover to governments wanting to participate but restrained by public opposition.

La desinteligencia de la inteligencia 22 August 2003
By Mariano Aguirre

The Attack on UN Headquarters in Baghdad - A Response 20 August 2003
By Phyllis Bennis
The UN became an accomplice in the illegal occupation of Iraq and so became a target of militants resisting the US-UK occupation. The UN should pull out of Iraq, and refuse to return until the US ends its occupation. Only then should UN humanitarian agencies go back to work in support of the people of Iraq.

Phyllis Bennis Online discussion with the readers or Washington Post about bombing of the uN Headquarters in Iraq, 20 August 2003

Bush and King Henry - Similar Birds of Different Feathers 7 August 2003
Saul Landau

A Dangerous Collusion Frontline, 2 August 2003
By Praful Bidwai
The American desperation to get military support for the occupation springs from a deep credibility crisis and rising costs.

Praful Bidwai No troops for Iraq 1 August 2003
The US has failed to control the political and military situation in Iraq despite deploying more than one third of its combat brigades. Now it concentrates its efforts on recruiting South Asian soldiers to relieve its demoralised troops.

Stay Out of the Mess The Hindustan Times, 25 July 2003
Praful Bidwai

In building empire the US has unleashed hostile forces which it barely comprehends, let alone controls. If the Indian government wants to retain a semblance of moral legitimacy, it must keep out of the Iraq quagmire.

Saul Landau Remember the old Saw about a Government of Law? 24 July 2003
Only the USA and Israel can legitimize murder as part of its tactical arsenal. But when assassination becomes acceptable policy, when Rambo becomes more than a film hero, notions of a republic and accountability become downright impractical.

Peace and Justice Movement has an enormous possibility! interview with Phyllis Bennis, 7 July 2003
"There has never been a moment when there has been this unified public opposition to a US war. And that movement is still in formation, it is still growing. If the political operatives in the Bush administration start getting nervous about what the polls say, and they will if we do our job right as the Peace and Justice Movement in the US and globally, then there will be the change in policy because they will be afraid of losing the elections. So I think we have enormous possibility."

The Intelligence Culture in the National Security Age 10 July 2003
By Saul Landau
If the CIA had not withheld key information from the UN inspectors deployed in Iraq, there would have been greater public demand that the inspection process continue.

If the CIA had not withheld key information from the UN inspectors deployed in Iraq, there would have been greater public demand that the inspection process continue

Praful Bidwai Courting disaster in Iraq Frontline, 5 July

How can India send its troops to serve as a "stabilising forces" in Iraq, when it opposed the war on Iraq? If Iraq's invasion was unjust, immoral and illegal, how can its occupation, caused by the invasion, be acceptable?

More Loyal than the King? 27 June 2003
By Praful Bidwai
If India's true national interest has something to do with universal moral principles, independence in policy, and opposition to hegemony, pillage and Empire, we must categorically, and unhesitatingly, refuse to send troops to Iraq.

Don't sanctify US Empire! 24 June 2003
By Praful Bidwai
As the US' western pro-war allies have refused to commit many troops to Iraq, the pressure is now on India to put its soldiers in the firing line and thus help legitimise the occupation.

Critical Moment for India Frontline, 21 June 2003
By Praful Bidwai
Heavy US pressure to despatch troops to Iraq poses a serious test for the independence of India's foreign and security policies; New Delhi's response to the pressure will determine its future stance on America's plans for a global Empire.

Row Brewing over Proposal to Send Troops to Iraq 19 June 2003
By Praful Bidwai
If India sends its troops to Iraq in the face of opposition from public opinion and opposition parties, this will prove extremely divisive and create serious strife in India.

China's Historic Failure 17 June 2003
By Achin Vanaik
China's foreign policy has long been marked by a strategy of soothing the US in the hope of being admitted to the club of superpowers. This has only brought her more troubles, however. India should not follow that logic in yielding to the US pressure to send its troops to Iraq and thus give the occupation cover of legality

Great Power Delusions 13 June 2003
By Praful Bidwai
Inda has to resist the US pressure to send peacekeeping troops to Iraq and thus legitimize the Iraqi occupation.

Democracy is a Long Shot 27 May 2003
By Boris Kagarlitsky
It is not very likely democracy will flourish in Iraq, with the country divided between ethnic and religious groups. But if Anglo-American forces stay around long enough and make enough mistakes to turn all the factions in Iraqi society against them, they could contribute to the unification of Iraq despite themselves.

Roadmap to Injustice 8 May 2003
By Achin Vanaik
The takeover of Iraq is the first step in the effective re-colonisation of West Asia. But without 'resolving the Palestine issue' the region cannot be stabilised

Resisting Hegemony 7 May 2003
By Achin Vanaik
In the longer term, hegemony depends on the capacity to secure public consent for domination. That is why the US government is so determined to portray its invasion of Iraq as carried out to 'liberate' the Iraqi people.

A New, Angry, Pentagon Colony 26 April 2003
By Praful Bidwai
The US "liberators" now face the wrath of the people who see the occupation as history repeating itself - 85 years after the British colonised Iraq.

El imperio se relanza 24 April 2003
by Mariano Aguirre
As the only superpower, the US doesn't like competitors neither among its enemies nor among its allies, and is determined to use force in all its possible manifestations to preserve that position.

Pax Romana versus Pax Americana: Contrasting Strategies of Imperial Management 23 April 2003
by Walden Bello
With the US increasingly seen as a universal threat, France, Germany, Russia and China will consolidate the balancing coalition that emerged during the Iraq crisis.

Iraq War: A Policy of Christian and Jewish Fundamentalism; Worse Lies Ahead 24 April 2003
by Saul Landau
9/11 served as a US equivalent of Hitler's 1933 Reichstrag fire in which "fighting terrorism" became the pretext for radical new forms of control at home and abroad.

Deterrence is for Dummies 18 April 2003
by Praful Bidwai
After no weapons of mass destruction were found in Iraq, the message the war sends is: if you don't have WMD, but let in the inspectors, you get attacked.

Who Rules the Peace When the Rulers Break the Rules? 3 April 2003
by Phyllis Bennis
Because the war itself is illegal, any post-war US occupation will be illegal too. That means the United States should not be allowed to claim any power to rule or determine economic, political or social arrangements in post-war Iraq.

An Agenda for Justice 3 April 2003
by Phyllis Bennis and John Cavanagh
The global movement for peace and justice we are building should emphasize the primacy of internationalism and the centrality of the United Nations

Grave Perils of 'pre-emption' 15 April 2003
by Praful Bidwai
Public-spirited citizens everywhere must demand that their governments don't recognise either an 'interim' US-led administration or a puppet government in Iraq.

The Blame Game Begins 3 April 2003
by Praful Bidwai
If the war doesn't go as Washington planned there will be a search for the culprit in the Washington administration.

The Emperor's new Clothes 7 April 2003
by Praful Bidwai
The two stated objectives of the war coalition were to severely discipline 'deviant' Iraq and to promote 'pluralist democracy' in the Middle East. Neither is likely to happen without bloodshed. The second may never happen.

Shop, Go to Church, Support Bush and wait for Armageddon 17 April 2003
by Saul Landau
Since 9/11/01 God has emerged as the dominant force in US politics. Bush has been using good vs. evil rethoric to justify the war on Iraq and conceal the real motives for it.

Virtual Saddam Takes Aim 15 April 2003
by Boris Kagaritsky
The Anglo-American coalition can run Iraq as an occupying regime, risking increasing guerrilla activity in the cities and resistance from Hussein's clan, or they can make a deal with Hussein's people.

To the Mountain Open Democracy, 14 April 2004
By John Berger
Iraq, the Republic of Fear under Saddam, is now ruled by a Coalition of Fear. The distinguished writer John Berger said on the eve of war that lies prepare the way for missiles. Now he sees revealed in the desperate chaos of Baghdad the blindness of a force whose pitiless weaponry and limitless ambition offer no insight into the truths of its conquest.

US: Losing the Political War 12 April 2003
by Praful Bidwai
The amazing Iraqi resistance to the Anglo-American invasion has upset war plans, and raised the political costs for Washington to nightmarish levels.

The Day After the Statues Fall 10 April 2003
by Phyllis Bennis
The fact that many Iraqis are pleased with the destruction of the regime does not mean the US war was legal, justified or appropriate. All of the violations of the UN charter are still violations, and we will never know how many Iraqi civilians and unwilling conscripts died.

Now, a Puppet in Iraq 10 April 2003
by Praful Bidwai
Although Washington promised it would not impose a government on Iraq from the outside, it plans to secure the entire country over six months through an interim administration headed by Lt Gen Jay Garner.

Saddam Won Gulf War 2; Long Live Gulf War 3 10 April 2003
by Saul Landau
Sure, many Iraqis want to get rid of Saddam, but it is doubtful they wanted US to do the job.

Iraq: Bloody Anarchy, Rather than Democratic Order, Looms 9 April 2003
by Praful Bidwai
The US plans to install puppet regime in Iraq, to what Iraqi people are likely to be allergic. The result could be chaos.

Unpleasant Surprises Ahead8 April 2003
By Boris Kagarlitsky

The Emperor's new Clothes 7 April 2003
By Praful Bidwai
The two stated objectives of the war coalition were to severely discipline 'deviant' Iraq and to promote 'pluralist democracy' in the Middle East. Neither is likely to happen without bloodshed. The second may never happen.

An Agenda for Justice 3 April 2002
John Cavanagh and Phyllis Bennis
The global movement for peace and justice we are building should emphasize the primacy of internationalism and the centrality of the United Nations

Who Rules the Peace When the Rulers Break the Rules? 3 April 2003
By Phyllis Bennis
Because the war itself is illegal, any post-war US occupation will be illegal too. That means the United States should not be allowed to claim any power to rule or determine economic, political or social arrangements in post-war Iraq.

America Under Threat 3 April 2003
By Boris Kagarlitsky
America repeats the Rome way, from the Republic to the Empire. With all the consequences for the democracy that follow it.

The Blame Game Begins 3 April 2003
By Praful Bidwai
If the war doesn't go as Washington planned there will be a search for the culprit in the Washington administration.

Shock and Awe: The New US Method of Reasoning 3 April 2003
By Saul Landau
The US doesn't stop at manufacturing reasons for the war, but goes on with manufacturing news.

The Stalemate in Iraq and the Global Peace Movement 2 April 2003
By Walden Bello
Washington may no longer be so brash when confronted with military stalemate. For forces opposing the war, now is the time to press on with the demand for unilateral withdrawal of the US and UK from raq.

The Naked Emperor 1 April 2003
By Achin Vanaik
The sheer brazenness of US behaviour has forced upon the international public's consciousness the recognition as never before that the US is an emperor without clothes; that this war is being fought for imperial purposes, no matter what are Washington's official explanations.

'Shock And Awe' Kills Innocents 1 April 2003
By Praful Bidwai
The war coalition miscalculated about the quick victory of their 'Shock and Awe' strategy. The coalition has suffered numerous seatbacks, which have the potential to radically change the course of the conflict, especially its political complexion.

An Agenda for Global Hegemony 29 March 2003
By Praful Bidwai
Bush's war for Empire has earned the United States universal loathing and contempt. The need for a mass peace movement which brings America to heel has never been more urgent.

The Humanitarian Aid Conundrum 27 March 2003
By Phyllis Bennis
The UN Security Council is likely to vote tomorrow (28 March) on a resolution outlining how emergency humanitarian aid will be provided to Iraqis. The US should not be let to have it its way.

Crude Vision: How Oil Interests Obscured US Government Focus On Chemical Weapons Use by Saddam Hussein
SEEN, 24 March 2003
"In their own words, we now see that for Administration officials, a dictator is a friend of the United States when he is willing to make an oily deal, and a mortal enemy when he is not".

Iraq: Ominous Signs Grow for US, Britain in "Shock and Awe" War Inter Press Service, 24 March 2003
By Praful Bidwai
It is becoming apparent that the shrunken war coalition comprising the United States, Britain and Australia will probably not enjoy the luxury of a swift, smooth, decisive, victory - despite its overwhelming military superiority over Saddam Hussein's forces.

Coalition of the Willing or Coalition of the Coerced? II [PDF document], IPS, 24 March 2003
Updated based on the Administration's released list of coalition members.

IPS press release introduces a report: Coalition of the Willing or Coalition of the Coerced? [PDF document], IPS, 26 February 2003
The study examines the specific levers of US military, economic, and political power and looks at how this leverage applies to each current member of the UN Security Council, and also over the broader group of countries that the Bush Administration has dubbed the "Coalition of the Willing."

Understanding the US-Iraq Crisis: The World's Response, the UN and International Law a report by Phyllis Bennis
To truly understand why the world stands at the brink of war, one must look closely at the goals of the current Bush administration, which is drawn to conflict by Iraq's massive oil reserves and the goal of expanding US military power around the world. - 43 questions and answers on the current crisis, the history of US-Iraq relations, and alternatives to war, Institute for Policy Studies, January 2003

In August 1999, TNI Fellow Phyllis Bennis accompanied the first group of US Congressional staffers to Iraq, to report back to their bosses on the impact of US policy in Iraq: on the humanitarian crisis facing Iraqi civilians and on the effect of depleted uranium.
[ Report from Congressional Staffers' 1999 trip to Iraq]