Resultados de la búsqueda

16 items
  1. The ‘deja vú’ of aerial crop spraying in Colombia

    Nicolás Martínez Rivera
    29 Febrero 2020
    Article

    At the end of 2019 the government of Iván Duque presented a draft decree to resume the spraying of drug crops used for illicit purposes. It argued that spraying is the only instrument to curb the increase in coca crops.

  2. Timeline - Fumigation in Colombia

    30 Septiembre 2015
    Infograph

    For 37 years Colombia has been spraying chemicals to combat illicit crops, particularly coca. These massive eradication programmes became part of the US-backed 'War on Drugs'. The fumigations are controversial for their proven inefficacy to reduce supply and demand for the use of herbicides such as glyphosate.

  3. Fixing a broken system

    • Juan Carlos Garzón Vergara
    30 Diciembre 2014
    Report

    Despite efforts by governments in Latin America, illicit drugs continue to provide one of the largest incomes for criminal organizations, enabling them to penetrate and corrupt political and social institutions.

  4. Colombia, more than three decades of toxic sprayings. Enough!

    Amira Armenta
    26 Septiembre 2014
    Article

    It is unfortunate that 35 years after the first chemical spraying in the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta, we are still writing about aerial sprayings in Colombia, demanding the current government to definitely defer an ecocide and incompetent policy.

  5. Drugs as war economy and the peace process

    • Ricardo Vargas
    28 Octubre 2013
    Policy briefing

    Colombia's peace negotiations appear to have a rather simplistic view of drug production and trafficking that does not properly address the complex relationship between drugs and armed conflict.

  6. Thumbnail

    Narco-States Grope for New Strategy*

    Emilio Godoy*
    05 Noviembre 2012
    En los medios

    Mexico, Colombia and Guatemala face the need to modify their approach to the fight against drug trafficking and are urging the world to do the same. But Mexico and Colombia’s willingness to make the necessary changes is unclear.

  7. A breakthrough in the making?

    • Amira Armenta, Pien Metaal, Martin Jelsma
    25 Junio 2012

    Remarkable drug policy developments are taking place in Latin America. This is not only at the level of political debate, but is also reflected in actual legislative changes in a number of countries. All in all there is an undeniable regional trend of moving away from the ‘war on drugs’. This briefing ex­plains the background to the opening of the drug policy debate in the region, summa­rises the most relevant aspects of the on­going drug law reforms in some countries, and makes a series of recommendations that could help to move the debate forward in a productive manner.

     

  8. Drug Policy in the Andes

    • Coletta Youngers, Socorro Ramírez
    15 Diciembre 2011

    Fifty years after signing the United Nations Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs and 40 years after the U.S. government declared a "war on drugs," many obstacles remain despite the partial successes of efforts to counter the problem. The Andean-United States Dialogue Forum, noted with concern how drug policy has monopolized the diplomatic and economic agenda between the Andean countries, contributing to tensions among the governments and impeding cooperation on other crucial priorities, such as safeguarding democratic processes from criminal networks.

     

  9. Thumbnail

    Alternative Development, Economic Interests and Paramilitaries in Uraba

    • Moritz Tenthoff
    01 Septiembre 2008
    Policy briefing

    The following document analyses how the Forest Warden Families Programme and the Productive Projects of the Presidential Programme Against Illegal Crops in Colombia have been used to legalise paramilitary structures and implement mega agro-industrial projects in the Uraba Region.

  10. Thumbnail

    Coca, Petroleum and Conflict in Cofán Territory

    • Moritz Tenthoff
    01 Septiembre 2007
    Policy briefing

    Under the guise of the war on drugs and terror, the way is being cleared for major economic interests in the Lower Putumayo (Colombia). This paper examines the impact of coca cultivation, petroleum activity and the armed conflict on the ancestral territory of the Cofán community.

  11. Colombia coca cultivation survey results

    • Drugs and Democracy
    01 Junio 2007
    Policy briefing

    Despite 2006 witnessing the most intensive use of fumigation in the country’s history, some 157,200 hectares of cultivation areas were detected, 13,200 hectares more than in 2005. Is the fumigation strategy failing?

  12. Thumbnail

    The Sierra de la Macarena

    • Drugs and Democracy
    19 Septiembre 2006
    Policy briefing

    Re-establishing fumigation is not going to legitimise or win acceptance of the State's activities in the territory of the Park. It is not going to protect the Park from the environmental deterioration generated by the critical interventions of social and military actors in the war. It is also not going to really affect the FARC's "bankroll". What it will do is create well-fertilised territory for the prolonging of the armed conflict.

  13. Thumbnail

    Political Challenges Posed by the Failure of Prohibition

    • Ricardo Vargas
    01 Mayo 2006
    Policy briefing

    After a slight dip in coca production during 2003 and 2004, the Andean region has returned to the historical average of 200,000 hectares of coca crops.

  14. Thumbnail

    Aerial spraying knows no borders

    • Drugs and Democracy
    01 Septiembre 2005
    Policy briefing

    In this briefing the Transnational Institute explains why the Colombian government has been unwilling to give ground on this minimal demand, which the Ecuadorians have been making since 2001, shortly after the aerial spraying began as part of Plan Colombia.

  15. Thumbnail

    Colombia: Drugs & Security

    02 Enero 2005
    Policy briefing

    The consequence of associating the 'war on drugs' with the 'war on terrorism' is that the failure of the former could end with the failure of the latter. The predominant military approach to 'narcoterrorism' fails to recognise the complex factors underlying both the drug problem and the violence; it assumes that the drug problem can be solved by force and that the armed conflict can be resolved by intensifying the conflict - that is, more war on war; and it has facilitated the consolidation of conventional drug-trafficking structures.

  16. Thumbnail

    Coca Fumigation Hinders Colombian Peace Negotiations

    Martin Jelsma
    01 Noviembre 1998
    Article