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254 items
  1. Climate security

    01 Enero 2015
    Tema

    Climate impacts are increasingly being viewed through the lens of security, with the expectation that climate change will result in instability and conflict. In practice, this turns the victims of climate change into 'threats', to be controlled by military force, police repression and policies that entrench corporate control at a cost to human rights and civil liberties. TNI started exploring this work in 2011, developing a book published in November 2015, The Secure and the Dispossessed - How the Military and Corporations are shaping a climate-changed world

  2. A woman attends her produce post in a market in zone 3, Guatemala City.

    Trade & Investment Alternatives

    01 Enero 2015
    Tema

    The Alternative Trade Mandate Alliance is an alliance of currently almost 50 organisations, developing an alternative vision of European trade policy that puts people and planet before big business.

  3. Protest Berlin, Trudeau visit  in Berlin 17 Feb 2017

    CETA

    01 Enero 2015
    Tema

    The Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) is a proposed free trade agreement between Canada and the European Union. The negotiations for CETA concluded on August 1, 2014, but its completion and ratification is expected to take at least two years, due to the number of parties involved. Many sections of the agreement have been severely criticised, in particular its Investor-State Dispute Settlement processes (ISDS) and its likely negative implications for the environment.

  4. Binding Treaty TNCs

    01 Enero 2015
    Tema

    This alliance for a binding treaty on Transnational Corporation (TNC's) gathers global networks and alliances including Dismantle Corporate Power Campaign, FIAN, Friends of the Earth International and Transnational Institute, among others, which collectively represent more than 500 groups world-wide who are determined to stop corporate human rights violations.

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    Public Public Partnerships

    01 Enero 2015
    Tema

    TNI is advocating Public Public Partnerships (PUP) as an alternative policy to privatisation or to Public-Private Partnerships in water services as well as a concrete tool to work with partners to reform public water companies/utilities, improve services and realise the right to water on the ground. A public-public partnership (PUP) is simply collaboration between two or more public authorities or organizations, based on solidarity, to improve the capacity and effectiveness of one partner in providing public water or sanitation services. They have been described as a “peer relationship forged around common values and objectives, which exclude profit-seeking”. PUPs avoid the risks which are typically encountered in public-private partnerships: transaction costs, contract failure, renegotiation, the complexities of regulation, commercial opportunism, monopoly pricing, commercial secrecy, currency risk, and lack of public legitimacy. In general the objectives of PUPs are to improve the capacity of the assisted partner. In practice, PUPs' work can be divided into five broad categories: training and developing human resources, technical support on a wide range of issues, improving efficiency and building institutional capacity, financing water services, improving participation. Public Community Partnerships Public-communitarian partnerships (PCPs) are internationally referred to as public-public partnerships but PCPs has a stronger connotation of community. While government and public water authorities should adopt and implement a water delivery policy that prioritises serving the needs of rural communities, many state-owned utilities fail to serve hard-to-reach areas. Community-based water systems are bridging the gap in water service delivery in many parts of Asia, Africa, and Latin America. TNI has observed new forms of partnerships between public authorities and rural communities, in which the communities are engaged in the decision-making about water solutions, supported with public funding and expertise and are empowered to take responsibility for running water systems. Such partnerships can bring rapid and lasting improvements.

  6. Sulphur Mining at Kawah Ijen

    Corporate Impunity

    01 Enero 2015
    Tema
  7. Harm reduction

    01 Enero 2015
    Tema

    Harm reduction is a set of strategies that aim to reduce negative consequences of drug use, by mitigating the potential dangers and health risks. The United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) has significantly expanded its HIV/AIDS programme thanks to support from harm reduction-friendly donor countries, despite ambiguities on the issue within UN drug control agencies. There is a need for up-scaling of basic services for HIV/AIDS prevention and the 'frontline' of heroin prescription and drug consumption rooms.

  8. Decriminalisation

    01 Enero 2015
    Tema

    Absolving drug users from arrest and prosecution for drug use and preparatory acts like acquisition, simple possession or cultivation for personal use does not lead to increased drug use, but does significantly lower pressure on law enforcement agencies and on the judicial and penitentiary systems, and it removes barriers for users with problematic patterns of use to approach treatment and harm reduction services.

  9. Proportionality of sentences

    01 Enero 2015
    Tema

    Studies reveal the ineffectiveness of long prison sentences for nonviolent drug law offenders. The capacity of the judicial system is stretched far beyond its limits, resulting in slow procedures, lengthy pretrial custody and overcrowded prisons. Referral schemes or specialized drug courts are introduced offering offenders a choice between prison and treatment. The main objective is crime reduction by providing nonviolent offenders the chance to escape the vicious drugs-crime-prison cycle.

  10. Drugs Scheduling

    01 Enero 2015
    Tema

    A more refined distinction is required to define appropriate drug control measures according to the specific characteristics of drug substances, their health risks, the dynamics of their markets and their user groups. The existing classification schedules for drugs from the UN 1961 and 1971 Conventions do not provide sufficient differentiation. The consideration of such diverse substances as coca, cocaine, cannabis, opium and heroin in the same schedule, hampers effective policy responses that can properly take into account the different properties of drugs and the reasons people use them.

  11. Human Rights & Drugs

    01 Enero 2015
    Tema

    Human rights apply to everyone. Drug users, traffickers and growers do not forfeit their human rights, and must be able to enjoy the right to the highest attainable standard of health, as well as to social services, employment, education, freedom from arbitrary detention and so on. The trend has been to toughen drug laws and sentencing guidelines, setting mandatory minimums, disproportionate prison sentences and even death penalties in several countries. Consideration of human rights are becoming essential elements in a growing number of countries’ application of drug legislation.

  12. Drugs Regulation

    01 Enero 2015
    Tema

    Consensus is growing that the prohibition on production, supply, and use of certain drugs has not only failed to deliver its intended goals but has been counterproductive. Evidence is mounting that this policy has not only exacerbated many public health problems, but has created a much larger set of social harms associated with the criminal market such as violence, corruption, organised crime, and endemic violence.

  13. The Drug Law Reform - Expert Seminars

    01 Enero 2015
    Tema

    The Drug Law Reform project organises a series of expert seminars, drug policy briefings and informal drug policy dialogues. The activities serve to cross-fertilise policy debates between countries and regions, stimulating participants to exchange experiences and learn lessons between policy officials, representatives from international agencies and nongovernmental experts and practitioners. Seminars are held under Chatham House Rule to ensure confidentiality and to allow participants a free exchange of ideas.

  14. Informal Drug Policy Dialogues

    01 Enero 2015
    Tema

    In 2004 the Transnational Institute (TNI) and the Andreas G. Papandreou Foundation (APF) started an Informal Drug Policy Dialogue. Purpose of the dialogues is to have an open-minded exchange of views on current dilemmas in international drug policy making and discuss strategies on how contradictions might be resolved. The meetings are guided by 'Chatham House Rule' to encourage a free exchange of thoughts and confidentiality. In 2007, TNI and the Washington Office on Latin America (WOLA) started a Latin American Informal Drug Policy Dialogue. In 2009, TNI and the German Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) started a series of drug policy dialogues in Southeast Asia.

  15. Renewables

    01 Enero 2015
    Tema

    Increasing renewable energy is critical to ending fossil-fuel dependency and providing energy for all, but it is critical it is not done in a way that dispossesses communities, benefits only corporations and a rich elite, and causes further environmental damage.

  16. This photo is from an investigative report from Rainforest Action Network that presents evidence that Cargill is operating two undisclosed palm oil plantations in West Kalimantan, Indonesia.

    Acaparamiento de tierras y aguas

    01 Enero 2015
    Tema

    En los últimos años, diferentes actores, desde grandes corporaciones nacionales y extranjeras (incluyendo financieras) hasta gobiernos, han iniciado un proceso de cercamiento de tierras agrícolas, principalmente en el Sur global, pero no únicamente. Este proceso se realiza a través de inversiones agrícolas o industriales a gran escala y se presenta frecuentemente como "inversiones a gran escala para el desarrollo rural". No obstante, en lugar de ser una inversión que beneficie a la mayoría de la población rural, especialmente a los más pobres y vulnerables, este proceso constituye una nueva ola de acaparamiento de tierras y aguas. Es un fenómeno global por medio del cual el acceso, uso y derecho a la tierra y otros recursos naturales relacionados es apropiado (a gran escala y/o por capitales a gran escala) resultando en una espiral de impactos negativos sobre los medios de subsistencia, el ambiente, los derechos humanos y la seguridad alimentaria local.    

  17. Hoja de coca

    01 Enero 2015
    Tema

    La hoja de coca lleva siglos masticándose y bebiéndose en forma de té en en la región andina, no causa ningún daño y, seguramente, resulta beneficiosa para la salud humana. Sin embargo, la hoja se trata como si fuera comparable a la cocaína o la heroína. La inclusión de la hoja de coca en la lista de estupefacientes fiscalizados plantea interrogantes sobre la lógica del sistema de clasificación vigente en virtud de las convenciones de la ONU. El TNI considera que podemos encontrar un enfoque que tenga en cuenta las especificidades culturales con respecto a las plantas con propiedades psicoactivas o ligeramente estimulantes, y que se debe distinguir más entre los usos problemáticos, lúdicos y tradicionales de las sustancias psicoactivas.

  18. Planta de cannabis

    01 Enero 2015
    Tema

    El estatus del cannabis en las convenciones sobre drogas de la ONU es objeto de controversia. El cannabis se encuentra ahora entre las sustancias más peligrosas. ¿Cómo y por qué entró el cannabis en las convenciones? ¿Es lógico que haya sido controlado? ¿Cuáles son las opciones para revisar el estatus del cannabis de acuerdo a los datos científicos actuales? ¿Sería una solución poner el cannabis bajo un régimen de control similar al de sustancias nocivas como el alcohol y el tabaco?

  19. Tratado vinculante para las transnacionales

    01 Enero 2015
    Tema

    Esta alianza por un tratado vinculante para las empresas transnacionales reúne a redes globales como la campaña Desmantelemos el poder corporativo, FIAN, Amigos de la Tierra Internacional y el Transnational Institute, entre otros, representando en total más de 500 grupos de todo el mundo, determinados a frenar las violaciones a los derechos huanos por parte de las trasnacionales.

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