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15 items
  1. The weed war undermines science

    10 Febrero 2015
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    Columbia professor Carl Hart: "The National Institute on Drug Abuse funds 90 percent of the world's research on drug abuse with our tax dollars.

  2. Daily marijuana use doesn't really change brains of adults or teens, study finds

    02 Febrero 2015
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    Late last year, the press and marijuana-legalization opponents gave a lot of attention to a study suggesting that daily marijuana use shrinks users' brains.

  3. No, marijuana use doesn’t lower your IQ

    21 Octubre 2014
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    A 2012 Duke University study made international headlines purporting to find a link between heavy marijuana use and IQ decline among teenagers. Other researchers questioned the findings immediately: Columbia University's Carl Hart noted the very small sample of heavy users (38) in the study. A follow-up study published 6 months later in the same journal found that the Duke paper failed to account for a number of confounding factors. A new study from the University College of London provides even stronger evidence that the Duke findings were flawed.

  4. Teenagers who use cannabis every day 60% less likely to finish school

    10 Septiembre 2014
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    Teenagers who use cannabis daily before the age of 17 are more than 60% less likely to complete high school or university, research published in Lancet Psychiatry found. The researchers called for their findings to be considered in cannabis legalisation reform. Alex Wodak of the Australian Drug Law Reform Foundation said the evidence for the harms of frequent use in the study was "compelling" but added daily use before age 17 would be "pretty uncommon". Many studies show that prohibiting cannabis did not make it any less easy for young people to get hold of it. (See also: How much pot does it take to turn a teenager into a suicidal dropout? | Linking cannabis and suicide doesn't prove causation | Cannabis use in teens, suicide and school dropout: the jury is still out)

  5. How neuroscience reinforces racist drug policy

    Nathan Greenslit
    12 Junio 2014
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    A recent neuroscience study from Harvard Medical School claims to have discovered brain differences between people who smoke marijuana and people who do not. Such well-intentioned and seemingly objective science is actually a new chapter in a politicized and bigoted history of drug science in the United States. Different-looking brains tell us literally nothing about who these people are, what their lives are like, why they do or do not use marijuana, or what effects marijuana has had on them.

  6. No, weed won’t rot your brain

    17 Abril 2014
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    Headlines are screaming Marijuana Makes Young Brains Go to Pot. But a new study, published in the Journal of Neuroscience, does not in any way prove that casual marijuana use is bad for your brain. Whatever brain changes are seen in casual users, they don’t predict addiction, otherwise, all casual users would become addicted—or at least, a much larger proportion than actually do. Several generations of American adults survived far higher rates of marijuana use than we see now—without encountering a major epidemic of cognitive impairment, schizophrenia, or lack of motivation. (See also: Does researching casual marijuana use cause brain abnormalities? and Striking a Nerve: Bungling the Cannabis Story)

  7. Five biggest lies from anti-pot propagandist Kevin Sabet

    Sunil Kumar Aggarwal
    07 Agosto 2013
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    Kevin Abraham Sabet-Sharghi, Ph.D., aka Kevin Sabet, has been a headline-grabbing right-winger ever since his U.C. Berkeley days—where he did not study science or medicine despite his current appointment as an assistant professor of medicine at the University of Florida. His most recent incarnation as a co-founder of Project SAM (Smart Approaches to Marijuana) follows a stint in the Obama White House on its drug policy staff from 2009-2011. His personal website claims he is the “quarterback” of a new anti-drug movement, boasting that he’s been “quoted in over 15,000 news stories.”

  8. rolling-joint2

    Pot smokers might not turn into dopes after all

    13 Enero 2013
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    Cannabis rots your brain — or does it? Last year, a paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) suggested that people who used cannabis heavily as teenagers saw their IQs fall by middle age. But a study published today — also in PNAS — says that factors unrelated to cannabis use are to blame for the effect. Nature explores the competing claims. (See also: New Research Questions Marijuana’s Impact in Lowering IQ)

  9. INCB President voices concern

    15 Noviembre 2012
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    The President of the International Narcotics Control Board (INCB), Raymond Yans, has voiced grave concern about the outcome of recent referenda in the United States of America that would allow the non-medical use of cannabis by adults in the states of Colorado and Washington, and in some cities in the states of Michigan and Vermont. Mr. Yans stated that “these developments are in violation of the international drug control treaties, and pose a great threat to public health and the well-being of society far beyond those states”.

  10. Cannabis reduces IQ (and appreciation of context)

    Dean Burnett
    28 Agosto 2012
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    A new study suggests that young cannabis users run the risk of a lower IQ. In what is an impressively long-term cohort study, it was found that "those who started using cannabis below the age of 18 - while their brains were still developing - suffered a drop in IQ". Defending drugs is rarely a good move politically, and anti-drug legislation often occurs without the support of scientific evidence. Contrastingly, any scientific finding that suggests drug use may have detrimental effects is seized upon and often exaggerated, sometimes to ludicrous extents. And you know there'll soon be leaflets going around schools that explicitly state that cannabis makes you stupid.

  11. Does weekly marijuana use by teens really cause a drop in IQ?

    Maia Szalavitz
    28 Agosto 2012
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    Heavy marijuana use is associated with cognitive decline in about 5% of teens, according to a new study, which suggests that the heaviest users could lose 8 IQ points, according to a report, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. If the link is real, the effects on cognition could be dramatic. But intelligence and cognition is affected by a plethora of other factors, including genetic, social and environmental influences that may supersede any influence from drug use. 

  12. What should we do about cannabis?

    • Stephen Pudney
    09 Noviembre 2010

    No serious commentator doubts that cannabis is potentially damaging to the user. Like tobacco, it is typically smoked and thus shares the potential for lung disease. Like alcohol, it affects reaction times and may raise the risk of road accidents. Cannabis has also been associated with cognitive impairment, deterioration in education performance (van Ours and Williams 2008), and psychotic illness (Arsenault 2004). Moreover, cannabis is often – albeit contentiously – seen as a causal gateway to more serious drug use (Kandel 2002). The question is what to do about it?

     

  13. The changing use and misuse of khat

    • Michael Odenwald, Nasir Warfa, Axel Klein (eds.)
    07 Mayo 2010
    Within the last decade the hitherto little known psychoactive substance of khat has emerged as a regional and international issue. In the Horn of Africa khat production has spurred an economic boom, but dramatic increases in consumption have raised public health concerns. Given the complexity of the topic spanning multiple academic disciplines and fields of professional practice, the need for a systematic overview is urgent.
  14. Adverse health effects of non-medical cannabis use

    • Wayne Hall, Louisa Degenhardt
    17 Octubre 2009

    For over two decades, cannabis, commonly known as marijuana, has been the most widely used illicit drug by young people in high-income countries, and has recently become popular on a global scale. Epidemiological research during the past 10 years suggests that regular use of cannabis during adolescence and into adulthood can have adverse effects. Epidemiological, clinical, and laboratory studies have established an association between cannabis use and adverse outcomes.

     

  15. Cannabis Policy: Moving Beyond Stalemate

    • Robin Room, Peter Reuter (RAND), Wayne Hall, Benedikt Fischer, Simon Lenton, Amanda Fielding
    01 Septiembre 2008

    Despite cannabis being the most widely used illegal drug, and therefore the mainstay of the ‘war on drugs’, it has only ever held a relatively marginal position in international drug policy discussions. Amanda Fielding of the Beckley Foundation decided to convene a team of the world’s leading drug policy analysts to prepare an overview of the latest scientific evidence surrounding cannabis and the policies that control its use. The report of the Beckley Foundation's Global Cannabis Commission is aimed at bringing cannabis to the attention of policymakers and guide decision making.