ရှာလို့ရသောရလဒ်များ

36 items
  1. A Quiet Revolution

    • Ari Rosmarin, Niamh Eastwood
    01 မတ်လ 2016
    Report

    Many countries continue to incarcerate and criminalise people for possession or use of drugs, with criminalisation alone undermining employment, education and housing opportunities. In addition, many people who use drugs are often subject to human rights abuses by the state in jurisdictions which continue to criminalise them. The continued targeting of this group has not only a negative impact on the individuals in question, but their families and broader society as a whole. 

  2. Drug policy and incarceration in São Paulo, Brazil

    • Juliana de Oliveira Carlos
    14 ဇွန်လ 2015

    This briefing paper analyses the impact of drug policy on incarceration in São Paulo (Brazil). This research is expected to inform and assess some of the consequences of the current Brazilian drug policy, taking into account its impacts on prisoners’rights and on the criminal justice system as a whole.

  3. Policy Responses to Changing Markets of New Psychoactive Substance and Mild Stimulants

    22 ဒီဇင်ဘာလ အသုံးပြု စကားစု - လအမည် အပြည့်အစုံ 2014
    Report

    How does national legislation in different EU member states compare and how effective is the adding of new psychoactive substances (NPS) to the existing schedules of drug laws versus legislative experimentation designing new schedules or applying controls under medicines or consumer protection regulations?

  4. Cannabis policy reform in Europe

    • Tom Blickman
    21 ဒီဇင်ဘာလ အသုံးပြု စကားစု - လအမည် အပြည့်အစုံ 2014
    Policy briefing

    While in the Americas cannabis policy reform is taking off, Europe seems to be lagging behind. At the level of national governments denial of the changing policy landscape and inertia to act upon calls for change reigns. At the local level, however, disenchantment with the current cannabis regime gives rise to new idea.

  5. The Rise and Decline of Cannabis Prohibition

    • David Bewley-Taylor, Martin Jelsma, Tom Blickman
    07 မတ်လ 2014
    Report

    Cannabis was condemned by the 1961 Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs as a psychoactive drug with “particularly dangerous properties” and hardly any therapeutic value. Ever since, an increasing number of countries have shown discomfort with the treaty regime’s strictures through soft defections, stretching its legal flexibility to sometimes questionable limits.

  6. Uruguay’s historic cannabis regulation explained

    10 ဒီဇင်ဘာလ အသုံးပြု စကားစု - လအမည် အပြည့်အစုံ 2013
    Infograph

    Uruguay has become the first state to regulate cannabis use instead of criminalising users. This infographic explains why they took this pioneering step and how the regulations will work.

  7. parlamento-portugal

    A resounding success or a disastrous failure

    • Caitlin Elizabeth Hughes, Alex Stevens
    05 ဇန်နဝါရီလ 2012

    Two observers and scholars of the 2001 Portuguese drug policy reform consider divergent accounts of the reform which viewed it as a ‘resounding success’ or a ‘disastrous failure’. Acknowledging from their own experience the inherent difficulties in studying drug law reform, Caitlin Hughes and Alex Stevens take the central competing claims of the protagonists and consider them against the available data.They remind us of the way all sides of the drug policy debates call upon and alternatively use or misuse ‘evidence’ to feed into discussions of the worth, efficacy and desirability of different illicit drug policies.In doing so they provide pause for thought for those of us who operate as drug policy researchers and drug policy advocates.

    Download the publication (PDF)

  8. parlamento-portugal

    Drug Policy in Portugal

    • Artur Domoslawski
    31 သြဂုတ်လ 2011

    In 2000, the Portuguese government responded to widespread public concern over drugs by rejecting a "war on drugs" approach and instead decriminalized drug possession and use. It further rebuffed convention by placing the responsibility for decreasing drug demand as well as managing dependence under the Ministry of Health, rather than the Ministry of Justice. With this, the official response toward drug dependent persons shifted from viewing them as criminals, to treating them as patients.

     

     

  9. parlamento-portugal

    Dug Policy Profile Portugal

    • Maria Moreira, Brendan Hughes, Claudia Costa Storti, Frank Zobel
    23 ဇွန်လ 2011

    This profile describes the national drug policy of Portugal, a policy that has attracted significant attention recently in the media and in policy debates. It considers national strategies and action plans, the legal context within which they operate and the public funds spent, or committed, to resource them. It also describes the political bodies and mechanisms set up to coordinate the response to the multi-faceted problem and the systems of evaluation that may help to improve future policy. The profile puts this information in context by outlining the size, wealth and economic situation of the country as a whole, as well as the historical development of the current policy.

     

  10. The development of international drug control

    • Martin Jelsma
    15 ဖေဖေါ်ဝါရီလ 2011
    Policy briefing

    The emergence of more pragmatic and less punitive approaches to the drugs issue may represent the beginning of change in the current global drug control regime.

  11. Time to decriminalise drugs?

    • J P de V van Niekerk
    01 ဖေဖေါ်ဝါရီလ 2011

    The drug trade has increased globally in intensity and reach, and substance abuse in South Africa has escalated rapidly. Drug misuse is a major social, legal and public health challenge despite the war on drugs, in which the USA has a disproportionate influence. Why this lack of progress and what can be done about it?

     

  12. TNI-EMCDDA Expert Seminar on Threshold Quantities

    20 ဇန်နဝါရီလ 2011

    A wider trend for drug law reform is arising out of a felt need to make legislation more effective and more humane. Within this trend, a number of countries have considered decriminalisation or depenalisation models and many have, at least initially, considered threshold quantities as a good way to distinguish between what is possession and what is supply or trafficking and as a means to ensure that the sentences imposed are proportionate to the harmfulness of the offence.

     

  13. What Can We Learn From The Portuguese Decriminalization of Illicit Drugs?

    • Caitlin Elizabeth Hughes, Alex Stevens
    30 နိုဝင်ဘာလ 2010

    The issue of decriminalizing illicit drugs is hotly debated, but is rarely subject to evidence-based analysis. This paper examines the case of Portugal, a nation that decriminalized the use and possession of all illicit drugs on 1 July 2001. Drawing upon independent evaluations and interviews conducted with 13 key stakeholders in 2007 and 2009, it critically analyses the criminal justice and health impacts against trends from neighbouring Spain and Italy. It concludes that contrary to predictions, the Portuguese decriminalization did not lead to major increases in drug use. Indeed, evidence indicates reductions in problematic use, drug-related harms and criminal justice overcrowding. The article discusses these developments in the context of drug law debates and criminological discussions on late modern governance.

     

  14. Drug law reform in Ecuador

    • Sandra Edwards, Coletta Youngers
    09 မေလ 2010
    Policy briefing

    Across the hemisphere, frustration is grow- ing with the failure of the “war on drugs.” Many Latin American countries face rising rates of drug consumption, despite harsh drug laws that have left prisons bursting at the seams.

  15. Review of methodologies of evaluating effects of drug-related legal changes

    01 ဧပြီလ 2010

    This paper analyses scientific and grey literature that examines the consequences of drug law changes, and describes their approach and methodologies. A multi-part search strategy identified 36 primary studies coming from Europe, North America and Australia, which were then categorised by the type of legal change they examined; changes to laws addressing illegal use and possession, changes in laws regulating legal use and possession, and enforcement strategies of existing laws such as police crackdowns and employee drug testing.

    application-pdfDownload the document (PDF)

  16. Penalisation of drug possession

    • Ewelina Kuzmicz et al.
    01 ဒီဇင်ဘာလ အသုံးပြု စကားစု - လအမည် အပြည့်အစုံ 2009

    Polish law provides punishment for possession of narcotic drugs. It is a controversial issue whether punishing for possession of any amount of drugs is a right thing to do. Regardless of one’s opinion, it is worth being aware of the consequences of the adopted legal solutions. In spite of the high cost, the enforcement of the Act does not result in mitigating drug problems in Poland, such as reduction of drug trafficking or “deterring” their potential users.

     

  17. Mexico: The Law Against Small-Scale Drug Dealing

    • Jorge Hernández Tinajero, Carlos Zamudio Angles
    01 အောက်တိုဘာလ 2009

    In August 2009, Mexico adopted a new law against small-scale drug dealing, which introduces some significant advances in key subjects, such as the recognising of and distinguishing between user, drug addict and dealer. However it still has significant flaws in continuing to treat demand and supply of drugs as a criminal and market phenomenon that are likely to undermine its successful application.

     

  18. Drug Policy Reform in Practice

    • Martin Jelsma, Tom Blickman
    25 သြဂုတ်လ 2009
    Paper

    The academic journal Nueva Sociedad recently released an issue to promote the debate in Latin America on drug policy reform. TNI contributed with the paper "Drug policy reform in practice: Experiences with alternatives in Europe and the US".

  19. Drug Decriminalization in Portugal

    • Glenn Greenwald
    01 ဧပြီလ 2009

    On July 1, 2001, a nationwide law in Portugal took effect that decriminalized all drugs, including cocaine and heroin. Under the new legal framework, all drugs were “decriminalized,” not “legalized.” Drug possession for personal use and drug usage itself are still legally prohibited, but violations of those prohibitions are deemed to be exclusively administrative violations and are removed completely from the criminal realm.

     

  20. Drug Decriminalization in Portugal

    • Glenn Greenwald
    01 ဧပြီလ 2009

    On July 1, 2001, a nationwide law in Portugal took effect that decriminalized all drugs, including cocaine and heroin. Under the new legal framework, all drugs were “decriminalized,” not “legalized.” Drug possession for personal use and drug usage itself are still legally prohibited, but violations of those prohibitions are deemed to be exclusively administrative violations and are removed completely from the criminal realm.

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